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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 00:50 GMT 
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Released July 16, 1973
Recorded January – February 1973
Genre Rock
Length 35:23
Label Columbia
Producer(s) Gordon Carroll

Side one
"Main Title Theme (Billy)"
"Cantina Theme (Workin' for the Law)"
"Billy 1"
"Bunkhouse Theme"
"River Theme"

Side two
"Turkey Chase"
"Knockin' on Heaven's Door"
"Final Theme"
"Billy 4"
"Billy 7"


Bob Dylan - (Rhythm) Guitar
Booker T. Jones - Bass
Bruce Langhorne - Acoustic Guitar
Roger McGuinn - Guitar
Russ Kunkel - Tambourine, Bongos
Carol Hunter - 12 string guitar, voices
Donna Weiss - Voices
Priscilla Jones - Voices
Byron Berline - Voices, Fiddle
Jolly Roger - Banjo
Terry Paul - Voices
Jim Keltner - Drums
Brenda Patterson - Voices
Carl Fortina - Harmonium
Terry Paul - Bass
Gary Foster - Recorder, Flute
Fred Katz - Cello
Ted Michel - Cello


Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid is a soundtrack album released by Bob Dylan in 1973 for the Sam Peckinpah film of the same name. Dylan himself appeared in the film as the character "Alias". Consisting of primarily instrumental music and inspired by the movie itself, the soundtrack birthed one of Dylan's most beloved songs — and biggest hits — "Knockin' On Heaven's Door", which became a trans-atlantic Top 20 hit.

A gold record, Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid reached #16 US and #29 UK.

Casting and filming Bob Dylan in Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid
Sometime in 1972, Rudy Wurlitzer approached Dylan about contributing music to Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. An old friend of Dylan's, Wurlitzer had written the film's original screenplay.

"Rudy needed a song for the script," Dylan said in an interview taken in 1973. "I wasn't doing anything. Rudy sent the script, and I read it and liked it and we got together. And then I saw The Wild Bunch and Straw Dogs and Cable Hogue and liked them. The best one is Ride the High Country...So I wrote ['Billy'] real quick."

Soon, Dylan was interested in contributing more than just "Billy" (described by Clinton Heylin as "a fine return to the ballad form he had forsaken after John Wesley Harding"). Dylan asked Wurlitzer if acting in the film was possible, an idea Wurlitzer was reluctant to support.

Around Thanksgiving Day, Dylan and his wife travelled to Durango, Mexico, where Peckinpah was filming Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. Dylan had always expressed an interest in Mexican culture, and he was more than willing to make the trip.

After his arrival, Dylan met with Peckinpah and played him "Billy" and "Goodbye Holly," both written specifically for the picture. According to Kris Kristofferson and James Coburn - both of whom were cast in the two title roles - Peckinpah was not enthusiastic about Dylan's participation.

"Sam says, 'Who's Bob Dylan?,'" recalls Coburn. "'Oh yeah, the kids used to listen to his stuff. I was kinda thinkin' of that guy Roger whatsisname, King of the Road guy, to do it.' And we all said, 'What!! You gotta see Dylan,'...He said, 'Okay, bring Dylan down.'...So the night we were over at Sam's house and we were all drinking tequila and carrying on and halfway through dinner, Sam says, 'Okay, kid, let's see what you got. You bring your guitar with you?' They went in this little alcove. Sam had a rocking chair. Bobby sat down on a stool in front of this rocking chair. There was just the two of them in there...And Bobby played [his songs]. And Sam came out with his handkerchief in his eye: 'Goddamn kid! Who the hell is he? Who is that kid? Sign him up!'"

Peckinpah then offered Dylan a role in film, but it was left to Wurlitzer to find one that was suitable. Wurlitzer ultimately suggested 'Alias.' Dylan would later claim "that there was nobody in that story that was the character I played." However, as Heylin reports, "not only did Alias appear in Wurlitzer's original version of the script, but he was a real historical character, mentioned by Garrett himself in his own Authentic Life of Billy the Kid. More than merely a member of Billy's gang, he was Billy's right-hand man."

However, Dylan would spend two and a half difficult months in Durango, Mexico, filming his role. During the course of production, his part was severely reduced. Wurlitzer claims this was done at Dylan's request, but Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid was also plagued with conflict between Peckinpah and MGM Studios. This resulted in MGM refusing Peckinpah's request to reshoot a substantial amount of footage lost to technical error. "Somebody dropped the main camera and for a while we had focusing problems," recalls Coburn. "The left and right of the screen were fine, but the bottom wasn't in focus. We needed to reshoot when we finally got the camera fixed." Peckinpah attempted to reshoot a portion of the tainted footage, but a majority of it was ultimately left lost.

The stress also took its toll of Peckinpah, and it would ultimately impact Dylan's role in the film as well. "[Peckinpah] was never able to sit down and figure out what Dylan was in the movie," recalls Kristofferson. "Bob kept sayin' to me, 'Well, at least you're in the script.'"


Recording sessions
As Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid neared completion, Dylan held a recording session on January 20 at Columbia's recording studio in Mexico City. Filming had been so difficult, both of the film's stars and Wurlitzer accompanied Dylan out of Durango. Wurlitzer said at the time, "Sam knows he's losing to Dylan...but I don't care, man. I've got to get away."

Backed by local Mexican musicians and members of Kris Kristofferson's band, Dylan had difficulty recording a satisfactory take of "Billy." Eventually, he began paring down the arrangement , and by the last take, he was backed only by bassist Terry Paul. This final take was used for the film and later included on the soundtrack album as "Billy 4." A brief instrumental, "Billy Surrenders," would also be featured in the film. The session would continue until 4 a.m., but it would not produce anything else that would be considered usable.

Meanwhile, Peckinpah hired Jerry Fielding to advise Dylan on his work. Fielding was experienced in film scoring, but he held very conservative views regarding popular music. Dylan was fully aware of Fielding's opinions regarding his work ("a lot of nonsense which is strictly for teenyboppers"), but he did not resist Fielding's recommendations on how to score the film.

On Fielding's advice, Dylan sang "a relevant verse" of the "Billy" ballad "as it fit the story at [four] separate points throughout the picture." Fielding had also heard Dylan's new composition, "Goodbye Holly," which was written for an important scene involving the character, Holly. Fielding recommended dropping this song and writing a new one for a scene involving the death of Sheriff Baker.

"I set up two dubbing sessions," recalls Fielding. "Dylan had this song ['Billy'] he'd written for which he had a limitless number of verses that he would sing in random order...So I had to tape Dylan's song, because he had nothing written down, and have it transcribed...At the same time I asked that he write at least one other piece of music because you cannot possibly hope to deal with an entire picture on the basis of that one ballad. So finally he brought to the dubbing session another piece of music - 'Knock-Knock-Knockin' on Heaven's Door.' Everybody loved it. It was shit. That was the end for me."

Dylan recorded the final version of "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" at a session in February, this time on Warner Bros. Records' soundstage in Burbank, California. "It was very early in the morning," recalls drummer Jim Keltner. "I think the session was 10 a.m. and again it all fell into place...There weren't any overdubs on that, the singers were singing live, little pump organ, Roger McGuinn I think played [guitar]. This was for a particular scene in the movie when Slim Pickens is dying and that's the first time I ever cried while I played. It was the combination of the words, Bob's voice, the actual music itself, the changes, and seeing the screen...In those days you were on a big soundstage, and you had this massive screen that you can see on the wall, [with] the scene...running when you're playing. I cried through that whole take."

The sessions at Burbank lasted several days. Though they were much more relaxed and amiable than the Mexico City session, the process was still irritating to Dylan. At one point, he told producer Gordon Carroll that "this is the last time I work for anyone in a movie on the music. I'll stick to acting." Though Dylan would produce his own films and later contribute songs to other soundtracks, he would never take sole responsibility for an entire soundtrack again.


Outtakes
The Mexico City session produced two notable outtakes: "Peco's Blues," an instrumental based on the traditional "What Does The Deep Sea Say?," and the song "Goodbye Holly." Both tracks were rejected but eventually bootlegged.

The Burbank sessions yielded a few spontaneous recordings, including a jam titled "Sweet Amarillo" and a simple, improvised song titled "Rock Me Mama." Neither one was seriously considered for the soundtrack as they were borne more out of leisure than actual work. The latter was eventually written fully and recorded by Nashville roots rock band Old Crow Medicine Show.


Aftermath
After Peckinpah completed his own cut of Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, MGM re-cut the film without his input, removing several significant scenes and re-shuffling most of Dylan's music in the process. "I could tell that it had been chopped to pieces,' recalled Dylan in 1985. "Someone other than Sam had taken a knife to some valuable scenes that were in it. The music seemed to be scattered and used in every other place but the scenes in which we did it for."

Severely re-edited, Peckinpah's film was released to mixed reviews and poor box-office receipts. Years later, critical re-evaluation of Peckinpah's film would lead many to regard it as one of his major works, a revisionist view aided by the restoration of Peckinpah's original cut in 1986.

As for Dylan, even though the experience was difficult, it proved to be a turning point, writes Clinton Heylin, "pushing him to finally abandon New York for sunnier climes, and providing him with a most unexpected return to the charts."

A soundtrack album was released to rather mixed reviews. It had been three years since his last 'proper' album, New Morning, and many critics hoping for another were disappointed in settling for a 'mere' soundtrack. "At least the strings on this soundtrack are mostly plucked and strummed, rather than bowed en masse," wrote Robert Christgau, "but it's still a soundtrack: two middling-to-excellent new Dylan songs, four good original Bobby voices, and a lot of Schmylan music."

Jon Landau was far more damning in his review published in Rolling Stone, writing "it is every bit as inept, amateurish and embarrassing as Self Portrait. And it has all the earmarks of a deliberate courting of commercial disaster, a flirtation that is apparently part of an attempt to free himself from previously imposed obligations derived from his audience...It is ironic that the most significant white rock figure of the Sixties has turned himself into one of the least significant of the Seventies. But the most perplexing aspect of it all seems to be the deliberate intent behind the decline. I can think of no other way to explain the gap between the man's earlier accomplishments and the recent dissipation of the quality of his work. But whatever the explanation, one can only note with sadness that in the midst of the summer morass of predictable popular music, Bob Dylan has once again broken the mold, only this time, with the least acceptable method available to him, an album neither exceptional, nor truly different, but merely awful."

Despite the album's lukewarm reception, it did spawn a significant hit in "Knockin' On Heaven's Door." Years later, it would endure as a popular favorite among critics and fans as well as a concert staple.

After witnessing first hand Peckinpah's battles with MGM, Dylan would have his own problems with Columbia Records. After years of minimal activity, Dylan had lost Columbia's patience, and when negotiations for a renewed contract began in 1972, the label (except for Clive Davis) had little interest in being generous. "Early in 1973 I finally did conclude negotiations for a new contract with Bob," wrote Clive Davis in his autobiography. "Basically, it was limited to a commitment for two more albums, plus the Billy the Kid soundtrack album - there was no time period involved...the guarantee was about $400,000 per album. Columbia [then] backed out of the deal after I left. Since the Billy the Kid movie had just been released, [Dylan's lawyer, David Braun] screamed that the soundtrack album commitment had to be honored; they couldn't go elsewhere in so short a time. So Columbia released it at the royalty rate agreed upon during my negotiations with Braun...When the single broke out of the album, and clearly showed Dylan's continued fertility, [Columbia head Goddard Lieberson] tried to resume negotiations."

Davis had been a longtime supporter of Dylan's, but he had been the victim of a corporate coup. While finalizing the details of Dylan's contract, Davis had been fired by CBS president Arthur Taylor on May 29. "Met at the door of Taylor's office by two CBS security men, he was then served with a civil complaint, alleging $94,000 worth of expense-account violations over six years," reported Heylin, "this from a man whose income in 1973 alone totaled over $300,000." Dylan would testify on Davis's behalf in a well-publicized civil trial held in July of 1975. In the meantime, the incident would sour Dylan's relationship with CBS, convincing him to sign with David Geffen's fledgling Los Angeles-based label Asylum Records. This switch would also coincide with Dylan's move to the West Coast.

Dylan had already purchased Malibu property in December of 1971 as an investment, but by April of 1973, he was beginning to settle there, leasing additional property on the adjoining land.

It was during this time that Dylan's songwriting began to increase in activity. "[I'd] been hanging out a lot with Bob in Malibu, playing basketball," recalls Roger McGuinn. "One day, he was sitting on the couch and we were trying to write a song together, and I asked him if he had anything and he said he had one that he'd started but he was probably gonna use it himself, and he started playing 'Never Say Goodbye.'" That song and two others, "Forever Young" and "Nobody 'Cept You," were soon demoed in June for his new publishing company, Ram's Horn Music. With a new label and renewed songwriting activity, the stage was set for his next project.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Garret ... 28album%29

Favorite Song: Knockin' On Heaven's Door and Billy. Two masterpieces.

Least Favorite Song: Turkey Chase... if my memory serves me well. Haven't heard it in a while.

Favorite Line(s):

Mama, take this badge off of me
I can't use it anymore


All of Billy, but this is one of my favorite verses

There's eyes behind the mirrors in empty places
Bullet holes and scars between the spaces
There's always one more notch and ten more paces
Billy, and you're walkin' all alone.

And

She may have been a whore, but she was a hot one

Overall Album Rating: 7.5. Peco's Blues(the bootleg of outtakes) is better.

Outtakes:

01 Billy 1
http://www.sendspace.com/file/kobs86

02 Billy 2
http://www.sendspace.com/file/ez6si2

03 Turkey
http://www.sendspace.com/file/nzxtcj

04 Turkey 2 Or Tom Turkey
http://www.sendspace.com/file/qe8svi

05 Billy Surrenders
http://www.sendspace.com/file/6tx21n

06 And He Killed Me Too
http://www.sendspace.com/file/kytq90

07 Goodbye Holly
http://www.sendspace.com/file/9x75ua

08 Peco's Blues 1

http://www.sendspace.com/file/1ij905

09 Peco's Blues 2
http://www.sendspace.com/file/9xsh4f

10 Billy 3
http://www.sendspace.com/file/6unx86

11 Knockin' On Heaven's Door 1
http://www.sendspace.com/file/hm4hhe

12 Sweet Amarillo
http://www.sendspace.com/file/bq4vzm

13 Knockin' On Heaven's Door 2
http://www.sendspace.com/file/g8i6eo

14 Knockin' On Heaven's Door 3
http://www.sendspace.com/file/qno5ca

15 Final Theme 1
http://www.sendspace.com/file/x2mssu

16 Final Theme 2
http://www.sendspace.com/file/a5u4c8

17 Rock Me Mama 1
http://www.sendspace.com/file/9p388v

18 Rock Me Mama 2
http://www.sendspace.com/file/c95xcu

19 Billy 4
http://www.sendspace.com/file/1behif

20 Billy 5
http://www.sendspace.com/file/z9lny0

21 Instrumental 1
http://www.sendspace.com/file/j9f4wu

22 Instrumental 2
http://www.sendspace.com/file/7pf96p

23 Final Theme 3
http://www.sendspace.com/file/jh09og

24 Final Theme 4
http://www.sendspace.com/file/eq6zcc

25 Bob's List
http://www.sendspace.com/file/4d1ncl


Reference of Series

12. New Morning

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 28&start=0

11. Self Portrait

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 61&start=0

10. Nashville Skyline

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 40&start=0

9. John Wesley Harding

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 12&start=0

8. The Basement Tapes

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 29&start=0

7. Blonde on Blonde

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 98&start=0

6. Highway 61 Revisited

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 76&start=0

5. Bringing it All Back Home

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 21&start=0

4. Another Side of Bob Dylan

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 13&start=0

3. The Times They Are A-Changin'

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 25&start=0

2. The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 92&start=0

1. Bob Dylan

http://expectingrain.com/discussion/vie ... 06&start=0


Last edited by Mr. Tambourine Man on Thu May 3rd, 2007, 16:18 GMT, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 00:57 GMT 
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Aside from giving us Heaven's Door, it appears to just be a soundtrack. Good little songs, but nowhere near what they could be, be that because of thematic constraints or just Dylan is irrelevant. And I agree, Pecos Blues is a better album haha



Just a quick rant of mine, whenever this film is brought up- How the f uck do you justify cutting out Peckinpah's opening killing of Garrett? Among MANY other things, it could have saved the film from its critical failure, not to mention that its one of cinema's beautiful montages


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 03:11 GMT 
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Does the DVD release include only the new arrangement of the film, or is the original sequencing around somewhere?

I still haven't seen it, though I want to soon at least out of novelty, but it sounds like the original cut was better.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 03:39 GMT 
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Well, there was a 1988 "directors cut" and an 01 "directors cut" The 01 is shorter, and, in my opinion, weaker. I believe they've released both in a 2 disc collection. If you see any version other then the theatrical (which is a must, to see how bad the Hollywood studio system can be) definitly go w/ the 88 version


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 04:02 GMT 
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Ok cool, thanks for the info.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 04:03 GMT 

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There are now 3 versions. There is a rough directors cut(meaning it was never really fine tuned) which is now called the 1988 Turner Preview Edition and is available on vhs and on the SECOND DVD of the new release. It is called the Preview Edition because it was just that, the preview cut Peckinpah put together under his own power to show the producers in post-production. It is also as far as Peckinpah ever got to bring it without the studio cutting it to pieces and Peckinpah eventually called for his name to be removed from the picture. The Preview cut is the cut Peckinpah screened for friends and family for the 10 years between finishing the film and his death, it was revived from his own personal copy of the film. The only difference is that somewhere along the way when they were putting together the television version they cut the scene between Garrett and his wife and never put it back in. So other than that one scene the preview cut really is the preview cut. The version the studio hacked to pieces and Peckinpah wanted to be removed from became the theatrical release which was canned by critics and fans alike, which I have seen on television, and I must say is the worst version, but not a horrible film. Even hacked up it's still a great movie, I mean it is all peckinpah footage. The third and most recent version is the version Paul Seydor(hollywood editor of such 'masterful' editing such as that of "turner and hooch", "tin cup", and "barbershop 2"... he also wrote a book on Peckinpah and is actually quite knowledgable on the subject) put together called the 2005 Special Edition Cut for the dvd release. Unfortunately because the Preview Cut is the only cut Peckinpah ever had a hand in Paul Seydor simply speculates what would constitute a final definitive cut of the film and on the dvd commentary he defends most of the changes as simply being choices he made based on what works in hollywood and what doesn't, because he's a hollywood editor. Worst of all, for some reason, Seydor believes this is in line with what Peckinpah would have done had he been able to make a final cut. Yet in my opinion he couldn't be farther from what Peckinpah would have done with this film and he only takes large bounds back from the '88 Turner Preview Cut, which is the best of the bunch

http://listology.com/content_show.cfm/c ... 465/Movies


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 04:08 GMT 

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I'd like to toot the horn of "Final Theme" from the album. A wonderful song to fall asleep to, and one of the only times you'll hear DylanFlute other than Budokan.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 06:11 GMT 

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Anyway, to make a long story short, for anyone who hasn't seen Pat Garrett before and wants to, here are some special instructions:

1. Purchase 2 Disc Special Edition DVD from shop.
2. Take Disc One, entitled 2005 Special Edition and throw in garbage receptacle
3. Take Disc Two, entitled 1988 Turner Preview Version and place in DVD player disc tray
4. Enjoy the show!


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 06:22 GMT 

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I love this album. Not just because of the film, the 1988 cut of which is among my top five, easily; but it's largely a beautiful, evocative record. The Main Title Theme was wonderfully used in The Royal Tennenbaums, proving that it can be viewed separately from Peckinpah's masterpiece. I'm also thinking of having it at my funeral. It is, like Ry Cooder's Paris, Texas, one of those rare soundtracks that can be enjoyed on its own terms, but is also incredibly powerful when associated with its respective film.

I don't think Peco's Blues is better, but a remaster of the album could easily be doubled - trebled, almost - in length and still fit on a CD.

Favourite moment: the guitar at around 1.40 on Main Title Theme (Billy).

All the stuff said about the most recent DVD cut of the film is true: horrific and arrogant in its conception. A good analysis is to be found here:

http://www.dvdtimes.co.uk/content.php?contentid=60755

I think the 1988 cut is both Peckinpah's best film and also the greatest cinematic meditation on mortality that I've ever seen. Dylan's soundtrack is in good company.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 06:38 GMT 

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That's a great DVD review, mack.

At what point do they play "Billy Title" in Tenenbaums? Funny, that movie features both Billy and Wigwam from Self Portrait.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 06:48 GMT 

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LittleFishes wrote:
That's a great DVD review, mack.

At what point do they play "Billy Title" in Tenenbaums? Funny, that movie features both Billy and Wigwam from Self Portrait.


I've lent out my copy so can't tell you, unfortunately. But it's in there somewhere!


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 13:44 GMT 

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This is not a sequence from the film, but a re-edited montage for Dylan fans:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=TSzhMwOk3vY& ... ed&search=


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 15:05 GMT 
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My own interest, as a Dylan fan, is in the soundtrack- and there are 5 versions, not "3".

The 1990 VHS is the same as the theater version.
The 1975 CBS-TV profanity-cleaned broadcast has the most Dylan.
The 1983 Laserdisk (the first of 2 "Director's Cuts") has unique initial 16 minutes with much longer opening theme (perhaps looped). From this version on, Dylan's contribution has been trimmed.
The 1988 Turner/Preview "director cut" often has damaged sound.
The Critics cut (2005) has the least Dylan.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 15:16 GMT 
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Thanks for all your work on these 'albums' posts, Mr. Tambourine Man. They are a pleasure to read whilst listening to the respective records.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 15:28 GMT 
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This question may have come up in the past but I fail to find an answer: Has the film version of "Billy Surrenders" ever been released, either commercially or on bootlegs?


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Thanks for all the insightful stuff.

I've always kind of liked this, based likely on our listening to it contemporaneously abetted by controlled substance. Made good "mood music"; the soundtracky stuff being tolerable Dylan as Ambient Elevator Music (better than any Bob Muzak I've ever heard), and the Kristofferson imitation at the end being perfect.

Just a couple side notes:

>
The Mexico City session produced two notable outtakes: "Peco's Blues," an instrumental based on the traditional "What Does The Deep Sea Say?
>

Never made the connection, I'll give it a fresh listening. This would be at least the second time Bob referenced that song, the first "Troubled and I Don't Know Why", which appears as a duet on Disc 1 of Joan's Rare, Live & Classic.

>
Jon Landau was far more damning in his review published in Rolling Stone
>

Didn't Landau end up on Bruce's payroll a year or two later (and mind you I like Bruce)? Is it possible that even in '73 he saw dollar signs backing the New Dylan, which might include badmouthing the Old Dylan. A surmise, in no way meant to impugn Mr. Landau's character.

Business is business.

Speaking of character,

>
Dylan would testify on Davis's behalf in a well-publicized civil trial held in July of 1975.
>

From what little I know of Bob's private persona, testifying in court is probably low on his Things to Do list. It speaks to who he is when we see evidence of his standing by people who stood by him.

Again, thanks for this stuff. I'm no cinephile and enjoy the commercial release of PG&BtK (saw it first in theatre with a nurse of my acquaintance), but understand it should have been better. Maybe I'll pick up that DVD... after I pay off the mortgage and fill up my gas tank.

BTW, #17 Rock Me Mama 1 fails. OK by me as I have this stuff somewhere but somebody else might miss it.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 20:36 GMT 

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I`ve always loved the soundtrack. One thing that bugs me every time I hear "Knockin on Heavens Door" is what is that odd crunching sound about 2-3 seconds in?


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 21:33 GMT 
Really good albumn.
I had asked before here if Dylan had ever played Billy live but I guess he hasn't.
I know that Hunter S. Thompson also liked this albumn and apparently had played Billy almost continuously for the last couple weeks of his life.


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PostPosted: Thu May 3rd, 2007, 21:58 GMT 

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lowgen wrote:
The 1975 CBS-TV profanity-cleaned broadcast has the most Dylan.
The 1983 Laserdisk (the first of 2 "Director's Cuts") has unique initial 16 minutes with much longer opening theme (perhaps looped). From this version on, Dylan's contribution has been trimmed.
The 1988 Turner/Preview "director cut" often has damaged sound.
The Critics cut (2005) has the least Dylan.


Which laserdisc version are you talking about? I believe the only USA laserdisc release was the Turner Preview cut from 1991. Are you sure you are not mistaken about this?

When you speak of Dylan's contribution being shortened, do you mean musical or acting?

Are you claiming the 1975 broadcast has footage not to be found in the theatrical cut or the Preview Cut? If so, I'd be curious to know what that footage is.


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PostPosted: Fri May 4th, 2007, 01:50 GMT 
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...replied by pm.


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PostPosted: Fri May 4th, 2007, 01:52 GMT 
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Location: garden of delights
LittleFishes wrote:
lowgen wrote:
The 1975 CBS-TV profanity-cleaned broadcast has the most Dylan.
The 1983 Laserdisk (the first of 2 "Director's Cuts") has unique initial 16 minutes with much longer opening theme (perhaps looped). From this version on, Dylan's contribution has been trimmed.
The 1988 Turner/Preview "director cut" often has damaged sound.
The Critics cut (2005) has the least Dylan.



When you speak of Dylan's contribution being shortened, do you mean musical or acting?

Are you claiming the 1975 broadcast has footage not to be found in the theatrical cut or the Preview Cut? If so, I'd be curious to know what that footage is.


Aha, that was exactly my questions when I read lowgen's post.
Especially the second.


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PostPosted: Fri May 4th, 2007, 02:43 GMT 
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LittleFishes wrote:
I'd like to toot the horn of "Final Theme" from the album. A wonderful song to fall asleep to, and one of the only times you'll hear DylanFlute other than Budokan.


YES, this whole soundtrack is my favorite thing to fall asleep to. Think I'll go do that RIGHT NOW. nighty night.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 4th, 2007, 03:04 GMT 
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This albumn always helps me sleep.


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PostPosted: Fri May 4th, 2007, 19:08 GMT 
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What's not to love here? Great album.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14th, 2007, 15:08 GMT 
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I don't know whether I would call it a great album but whenever I want to feel that 'hot chili peppers in the blistering sun' vibe I play it (the instrumentals) and I'm transported to another time and place - looking nothing like this one.


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