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PostPosted: Tue June 16th, 2009, 01:59 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 16th, 2008, 21:48 GMT
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Location: Connecticut
This one is a great tune I think. I got to see it last August in Foxwoods Ct (In Honour of Jerry Wexler I think). This one comes across good in a live forum. The studio cut is brilliant. Has the Foxwoods show surfaced yet August 15th 2008?? Anyway what's the gangs thoughts on this Christian era song? Any dates or postings are always welcome! Esp Smoke & Marker!!!! Talk away Thanks MEZ


Last edited by Mez on Tue June 16th, 2009, 02:06 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue June 16th, 2009, 02:03 GMT 
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A masterpiece.

I believe it's about Dylan's conviction to God, however with the best of his songs, it can be taken in other ways. The singing is heartbreaking.

Many great live versions of this too. I got to see it in 07 in Melbourne when it was played as the set closer, a very strange choice, but it worked for me.


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PostPosted: Tue June 16th, 2009, 02:08 GMT 
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Great song live...the early 80s with his Gospel fervor are my favorites but some of the ones in the Spring 2002 tour were mighty fine. He played a touching performance on April 2, 2005...it was the night after Pope John Paul II passed away.


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PostPosted: Tue June 16th, 2009, 03:00 GMT 

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I like it.. thought i have not delved into all of the religious tunes.. i will be soon.


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PostPosted: Tue June 16th, 2009, 10:16 GMT 
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mjeff wrote:
I like it.. thought i have not delved into all of the religious tunes.. i will be soon.
The Gospel era is worth visiting. There's some very interesting and good music there. Some real intensity in concerts.

Whatever it was that Bob felt he needed saved from, you can sense in the lyrics and performances that he was really investing himself, heart and soul. Like every other part of his career, there are some gems written around that time that didn't see the light of day for 15 years or better. There are a few great ones that have never had "official" release.


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PostPosted: Tue June 16th, 2009, 19:14 GMT 

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I like this song very much. I like the way that it uses the phrase "I believe in you" to mean so much more than just "I think you exist".


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PostPosted: Tue June 16th, 2009, 19:42 GMT 

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The song that best represents Slow Train Coming.
It is about Dylan's conviction to God despite all of the rationale that says otherwise.
It's about one's love for a higher power despite the alienation that goes with that.
It's about faith really.
A song I'm inspired by as much as Every Grain of Sand if not more.

Most recently, I've loved Cat Power's version:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CF2HCDsYcUw

Appropriately enough, Sinead O'Conner delivers a heartbreaking version:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xX9dG9_aUo4

The best song on Gotta Serve Somebody, the Gospel album is Dottie People's (you can play it on the right side of the screen:
http://www.last.fm/music/Dottie+Peoples ... eve+in+You

As for Bob himself, I must say the album cut is perfect. He has never equaled the power of that take. The chorus always gives me goosebumps, it's so raw and emotional.
I like a lot of the Gospel shows but they all pale next to the album.
As far as the NET, I'm not too fond of the early ones from 89-92, far too fast to gain any meaning from the lyrics.
I love it these days. It's just perfect for his voice.
All that being said, I have loved this song in recent years, especially with the current lineup.
He did it three times in 07, my favorite being the first from Ontario Canada. Bob's voice is monstrous and the band just sounds fantastic. The choruses are the closest I've heard to the power of that original.
An intimately epic rendition,

July 8 2007

http://www.sendspace.com/file/vxqdyv


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PostPosted: Tue June 16th, 2009, 21:18 GMT 
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Hate this song.


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 19:15 GMT 
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Hey, I was just listening to this old showtune by Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach.
"Smoke Gets in Your Eyes."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oipCyU5HYgU
Think it could have been an inspiration for I Believe in You? I do!
Reggie

P.S. Platters version - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57tK6aQS_H0


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 20:24 GMT 
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It's beautiful and humble. Always moving.


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 20:28 GMT 

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Love this song.

Particularly because it could apply to someone you believe in as much as it applies to Jesus.

I tend to direct the song towards people I know.


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 20:47 GMT 

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"I believe in you, even on the morning after" I'm sure this is not about God :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 21:00 GMT 

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http://tedbarron.com/bwflu-dec-08/41-I- ... In-You.mp3

http://boogiewoogieflu.blogspot.com/200 ... -zone.html


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 22:25 GMT 
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conal0102 wrote:
"I believe in you, even on the morning after" I'm sure this is not about God :lol:


No, it's just Bob's way to make fun of his background singers.


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 22:50 GMT 
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Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
Good song, great album. Last tour I saw, the Gospel tour in February 1980 in Charleston WV, tiny hall, crowd split between goofy Jesus people with head trauma smiles and hostile fans shouting the names of old songs. Hall was picketed by the Communist Worker's Party. Somewhere in the basement I have the negatives for a roll of b&w film I shot that night.


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 22:52 GMT 
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Say, you think you'll ever get them developed LJ?

p.s. Seriously, it's a bit like smoke gets in your eyes isn't it?


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PostPosted: Tue December 29th, 2009, 22:57 GMT 
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registeredtovote wrote:
Say, you think you'll ever get them developed LJ?


I developed them right after I took them, it's the negatives I have buried somewhere.


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PostPosted: Sun October 16th, 2011, 13:02 GMT 
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I BELIEVE IN YOU

Dylan / Cameron Crowe

A beautifully crafted track from the Slow Train Coming sessions. I Believe In You is an ode to commitment. One can only imagine the studio atmosphere on the Muscle Shoals evening when Dylan recorded this powerful vocal performance. It is one of his most intimate and best. Many would later conjecture about the object of his feelings. Was it a higher being? A woman? A child? Did it really matter?

First performed in public on Saturday Night Live in October 1979, the song would hover close to the top of Dylan’s subsequent concert performances.

50 Cult Dylan Classics – Q Magazine 2006

His faith was not all finger-pointing. On this tender evidence, he loved Christ just like a woman.

Andrew Perry – Mojo 100 Greatest Dylan Songs #82

Many Dylanites’ problem with his Christian period is a trading of lyrical subtlety and ambivalence for 2,000-year-old biblical dogma. This song, written with the convert’s fervour still freshly blazing in his heart (note the passionate vocal delivery), is a worthy exception. Here, a believer arrirms their faith in the face of doubting jibes and ostracisation. However, the faith’s exact nature is never explicitly stated – this could easily be a Dark End Of The Street-type lover, especially given the line, “I believe in you, even on the morning after”. Jack White is a fan – check the melodic “referencing” on 2005’s As Ugly As I Seem.

Oliver Trager

If anyone doubted that Dylan’s heart was truly in his born-again material, one need only listen to this profound, spine-tingling confessional. Dylan’s vocals may strain a bit on the official release, but his soul remains intact. A bold and unabashed ode to religious commitment, I Believe In You is one of Dylan’s most intimate and powerful vocal performances. Despite the religious nature of the album on which the song is found, Slow Train Coming, Dylan almost sounds as if he could be singing to a woman or perhaps a child in his vulnerable lyrics. Whatever the case, his eloquent expression and representation of himself as a vigilant new believer alienated from old friends and battling with himself – no backslider he – remains a powerful one.

In his 1982 book Voice Without Restraint: A Study Of Bob Dylan’s Lyrics And Their Background, John Herdman discussed some of the gray areas lying dormant in I Believe In You, writing that it “starts out from an emotion which he has always felt intensely – self-pity, in this case because his friends are deserting him, turning him away because of his beliefs (listen to the passionate dramatisation of the first “I” in the words “And I, I walk out on my own”) But the strength of the feeling rapidlt transcends, and indeed consumes, the claims of the ego. The attitude of submission, the stripping away of pride, is something quite new for Dylan, and even without the moving intensity of his singing, there is no mistaking the genuineness in the words.”

Pronouns have always played a fluid role in Dylan’s songwriting and the batches in Slow Train Coming and Saved are no different. Yet, for all the fuss and noise made over his conversion to “Born-again” Christianity, it is interesting to note how infrequently the songs hatched from the experience directly address the divide. Ceratinly, Precious Angel, Covenant Woman, and Do Right To Me Baby are sung to a woman, and Slow Train, When You Gonna Wake Up? And Gotta Serve Somebody are offered as a challenge to a secular audience. Further, Man Gave Names To All The Animals and When He Returns come of as watered-down Genesis and Revelation. And where Dylan used to show no shyness about squarely pointing his pen at those he held in low esteem – be they the backstabbing former friend in Positively 4th Street or the military-industrial complex as represented in Masters Of war – his denunciations on Slow Train Coming are couched at a third-person remove, as when he sings about the “masters of the bluff and masters of the proposition” in Slow Train or “the gangsters in power and lawbreakers making rules” in When You Gonna Wake Up?. Only in I Believe In You and What Can I Do For You? Does he figuratively get down on his hands and knees and strip himself spiritually bare before God. Still, despite the voice-cracking passion and sincerity with which he sings these songs, there is a shade of ambiguity, a sense that these words are meant for someone, not something. Certainly, Dylan’s 1992 comments to Los Angeles Times critic Robert Hilburn that I Believe In You is “just about overcoming hardship” did not exactly clear up any questions about to whom or what he was offering his soul.

Dylan first performed I Believe In You on his October 1979 Saturday Night Live appearance and went on to firmly slot it as the second song of each 1979 and 1980 gospel show. Thereafter, it was revived with nearly annual and, at times, abundant regularity during the length of The Never Ending Tour.

Clinton Heylin

Published lyric/s: Lyrics 85; Lyrics 04,

Known studio recordings: Muscle Shoals, Sheffield AL, 3 May 1979. [STC]

First known performance: 'Saturday Night Live', NYC, 20 October 1979.

“Unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake.” Philippians 1:29

By the time Dylan wrote I Believe In You, he had begun to turn other pages of the New Testament, arriving at Philippians soon enough, where he found out that there would be a price to pay for his new-found faith. Almost immediately, he felt compelled to express his conflicted feelings in song. As he told Robert Hilburn, a dozen years down the line, “I Believe In You was one of those songs that was largely just about overcoming hardship”. From the first verse, the narrator is depicted as a pariah because of his faith:

“They look at me and frown, like to drive me from this town They don't want me around, 'cause I believe in you.”

In conversation with the same Los Angeles journalist the year after he wrote the song, Dylan confirmed there was an autobiographical dimension to such expressions of rejection: I did begin telling a few people [about Christ] after a couple of months and a lot of them got angry at me.”

Here was something he had spent his life dealing with – rejection. But rather than believing in himself and his own judgement in the face of such hostility, he believed in Him. And how. Fusing blues commonplaces like “walk out on my own / A thousand miles from home / don't mind the pain / Don't mind the driving rain” to express the kind of treatment meted out to many an accidental martyr, he insists such belief cannot be shaken – not even “if white turn to black”. At song's end, though “friends forsake” him, he knows he “will sustain”.

The song, which in performance rarely wavered in intensity right through 1981, has itself sustained. A new, more muscular musical arrangement at the European shows that summer could not make its singer deviate from a profound conviction. Indeed, the sentiments of this song remained real enough – and personal enough – to transfer successfully to the Never Ending Tour, where it was reintroduced in July 1989, and where even a fast-failing capacity to hit the high notes could not dissuade Dylan from restating a now decade-old commitment. One likes to imagine that the night he sang it with all the passion – if little of the range – of yesteryear, in Minneapolis on 3 September 1992, he was singing it to his mother and brother, sat in the fifth row, wondering what this good Jewish boy was thinking. Well, he still was not going to go to hell for anybody – not for mother, not for brother.

Christopher Ricks

Virtue – Fortitude

There was once a "righteous king who wrote psalms". I and I is at one with I and You, there in I Believe in You – which sings "And I, I", and which is a psalm. As always in the Psalms, the unrighteous are the enemy. You, though, are my enemy's enemy, thank the Lord.

The stronger the unrighteous are, the more will fortitude be called for and called upon. "I will be sorry for my sin. But mine enemies are lively, and they are strong: and they that hate me wrongfully are multiplied" (Psalms 38:18-19). "Deliver me from my persecutors; for they are stronger than I" (Psalms 142:24).

The unrighteous are they. Unidentified, nameless. Psalm 3 begins: "LORD, how are they increased that trouble me! Many are they that rise up against me". Five verses later, it confronts those "that have set themselves against me round about".

I Believe In You begins:

“They ask me how I feel
And if my love is real
And how I know I'll make it through
And they, they look at me and frown
They'd like to drive me from this town
They don't want me around
'Cause I believe in you

Me around / me round about.

They prowl in and around the song. They are in the first and second verses, and they return to lurk at the last. But the hope that is fortitude ("I know I'll make it through") is at the heart of the song, for the word "they" is not to be heard in the central sequence of it: not in the bridge the first time (beginning "I believe in you even through the tears and the laughter"), and then not in the central verse ("Don't let me drift too far"), and then not in the bridge the second time ("I believe in you when winter turn to summer").

That there exists this they-free zone puts hope in me: you and I can be there on our own together. Yet we need to be still aware of the threat, since the bridge – the second time – has to acknowledge "though my friends forsake me". (Psalms 38:11, "my friends stand aloof from my sore; and my kinsmen stand afar off".)

"And they, they" rings out its duplicity once only. "And I,I..." counters this twice with its refusal to flinch: "And I, I walk out on my own", "And I, I don't mind the pain".

Printed in Lyrics 1962-1985, "And I walk out on my own". Dylan sings "And I, I walk out on my own".

“They show me to the door
They say don't come back no more
'Cause I don't be like they'd like me to”

The bad grammar is up to no little good, since it is not a matter of slumming or of dumbing down but of intimating something different. Instead of the expected "Because I'm not like they'd like me to be", the turn of phrase makes "I don't be" take into itself both "I won't be" and "I can't be" (like they'd like me to be). My choice and at the same time my destiny.

“Well, if I don't be there by morning / I guess that I never will" (If I Don't Be There By Morning, Dylan with Helena Springs).

People, uglily, will like yOU for being like what they want, which usually means like them.

“Well, I try my best / To be just like I am / But everybody wants you / To be just like them" (Maggie's Farm).

The pressure that whets the word – "be like they'd like me to" – is the malign counterpart to what had been for John Keats a happiness about what this little word "like" (likewise near "because") could do in the right hands:

"You will by this time think I am in love with her; so before I go any further I will tell you I am not...I like her and her like because one has no sensations - what we both are is taken for granted." (14 October 1818; Letters, ed. HE Rollins (1958), vol.I, p.394)

“'Cause I don't be like they'd like me to
And I, I walk out on my own
A thousand miles from home
But I don't feel alone
'Cause I believe in you”

These lines contain in themselves all that they simply need, so they do not stand in any need of our remembering an earlier song of Dylan's in which he did not feel alone because he believed in someone. Still, the relation between the two songs may have something to proffer.

“I'm out here a thousand miles from my home
Walkin' a road other men have gone down
I'm seein' your world of people and things
Your paupers and peasants and princes and kings”
(Song to Woody)

Including the righteous king who wrote psalms?

It is not that I Believe In You in any way reneges on the having believed in Woody Guthrie; rather that what had been social conscience has become religious conscience. "I'm seein' your world" has become seeing a world that is not any man's, even an especially good man who was a true artist. "For me He was rejected by a world that He created" (Solid Rock).

Woody Guthrie is not rejected by I Believe in You, but the song witnesses to belief in One who was despised and rejected, rejected of men (Handel's compassionate setting in The Messiah), and witnesses to how this has led to being despised and rejected.

"They don't want me around" and "A thousand miles" / Psalms 3:6: "I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people, that have set themselves against me round about.

Being so, not just feeling so. For the song moves past feeling. The first verse begins "They ask me how I feel", the second has "But I don't feel alone", and the bridge has "this feeling's still here in my heart". So we might have expected that every verse would want to speak of feeling. But the remaining twenty lines of the song choose not to do so – they evince a great deal of feeling, but all the more for making no further announcement. There is no longer any going along with the terms initially set by the unrighteous: "They ask me how I feel".

"And how I know I'll make it through": and as we make it through the song (process, not product, constituting any Dylan song), the word "through" modulates into the word "though", which then becomes the excrucial turn within the song. Dylan brings this about ("I believe in you when winter turn to summer") through having "even through" turn to "even though" (and on to "even on"):

“I believe in you even through the tears and the laughter
I believe in you even though we be apart
I believe in you even on the morning after
I believe in you even though I be outnumbered”

Whereupon "even though" is at once clipped back to the root of the matter:

“Oh, though the earth may shake me
Oh, though my friends forsake me
Oh, even that couldn't make me go back”

Dylan's vocal punctuation is dramatically other than that of his page: he takes back the snarled and yelping "Oh" so that it clutches all but desperately at the previous line of bridge no.1 and of bridge no. 2:

Oh, when the dawn is nearing
Oh,
when the night is disappearing
Oh,
this feeling's still here in my heart
Oh, though the earth may shake me
Oh,
though my friends forsake me
Oh,
even that couldn't make me go back

– with the strangled voicing of "heart" and of "back" bearing witness to hs nerving himself not to be forsaken by fortitude.

“They" may start as though solicitous, but their string of questions (like those bent upon Christ) is meant to entangle him:

“They ask me how I feel
And if my love is real
And how I know I'll make it through”

No answer is ever given to their asking – except the answer that is the song itself. Nothing is said to them ("no matter what they say"). Everything that is said is said to the One and to oneself, as with a psalm or a prayer. They may issue an imperative: "don't come back no more". But the song counters this with a plea, or rather two parallel pairs of pleas, set together not only by their syntax and their strong assonance but (I believe) by their invocation of the Psalms:

“Don't let me drift too far
Keep me where you are”

“Don't let me change my heart
Keep me set apart”

"O LORD, be not far from me" (Psalms 35:22). "Know that the LORD hath set apart him that is godly for himself" (Psalms 4:3).

Fortitude means keeping going. Which means, in its turn, that a song of fortitude must face something of the same challenge as a song of gratitude. The ending must maintain something. That the word "maintain" may itself be doubly a rhyme (it rhymes within itself and with other words) might prompt us to notice how Dylan at the very end, for the first and last time, brings it about that the refrain, " 'Cause I believe in you", is the culmination not of a single rhyme but of something that is doubly a rhyme, when two consecutive words rhyme, and are later rhymed with: do pursue / you.

“Don't let me change my heart
Keep me set apart
From all the plans they do pursue
And I, I don't mind the pain
Don't mind the driving rain
I know I will sustain
'Cause I believe in you”

See how Senor ends with what is doubly a rhyme: for, Senor.

They have their form of persistence ("all the plans they do pursue"). The answer must be my better form of it.

“And I, I don't mind the pain
Don't mind the driving rain
I know I will sustain
'Cause I believe in you”

The confidence, which is quite other than a boast, is realized in the syntax of "sustain", by which the breastplate of righteousness is variously buckled into place.

First, "I don't mind the driving rain that I know that I will sustain, and the reason that I don't mind is that I believe in you."

Second, "I don't mind the driving rain that I know that I will sustain because of (as a result of) my believing in you."

Third, "sustain" not as a transitive but as an intransitive verb, absolutely: "I don't mind the driving rain, for I know that I will sustain, because I believe in you."

The English language ordinarily has "sustain" be transitive, but would, I am sure, be willing to entertain an imaginative exception. As it did in the old days, when "sustain" could be intransitive (The Oxford English Dictionary: "to bear up, hold out") and when Wyclif could translate – as it happens – Psalm 130: "If wickedness thou shalt all about keep, LORD: LORD, who shall sustain?"

Psalms 130:3: "If thou, LORD, shouldest mark iniquities, O LORD, who shall stand?"

And it is the Psalms that sustain the close of I Believe in You.

Psalms 3:5-6: "for the LORD sustained me".

Psalms 55:22, "Cast thy burden upon the LORD, and he shall sustain thee".

"I know I will sustain". That this possibility, even if it is misguided, is not the extravagance of one man alone is borne out by Robert Shelton's having ended his review of Slow Train Coming with the words "He will sustain". Two men alone, maybe.

But, as everyone has noticed, I Believe in You begins with a tantalizing echo of an earthly love song of unearthly loveliness: Smoke Gets In Your Eyes.

Music by Jerome Kern, words by Otto Harbach.

Kern: "They asked me how I knew / My true love was true?".

Dylan: "They ask me how I feel / And if my love is real / And how I know I'll make it through".

There are other small overlaps. In the order within the Kern song: "here inside" / [Dylan] "here in"; "laughed" (and "laughing") / "laughter"; my love"; "today"; "friends"; "Tears"; "say"; "heart"; "realize" / "real". And there is “doubt" against "I believe". It is extraordinary how different in its effect, as a cadence andd a sentiment, is "Smoke gets in your eyes", from die wording elsewhere in Dylan:

“Smoke is in your eye" (When the Night Comes Fallingfrom the Sky).

The echo is in the music (just listen to Dylan's opening) no less than in the words. The words went to the making of Dylan's song, however different his world on this occasion, sacred, not secular – or rather, sacred, and therefore willing to accommodate the secularly human (whereas the secular is usually loth to accommodate the sacredly divine).

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

“They asked me how I knew
My true love was true?
I of course replied
Something here inside
Cannot be denied

So I chaffed them and I gaily laughed
To think they could doubt my love
Yet today
My love has flown away
I am without my love

Now laughing friends deride
Tears I cannot hide
So I smile and say
When a lovely flame dies
Smoke gets in your eyes

They said someday you'll find
All who love are blind
When your heart's on fire
You must realize
Smoke gets in your eyes.”

In addition to what is unmistakable in the openings, the Kern / Harbach / knew / true furnished Dylan with "I know" and with his rhyming refrain. "My true love was true?" became his "if my love is real". The object of my love is real, or my love? For while "true" might ask "Faithful?", "real" might ask "Actually exists?" To believe in a human being may be to trust her or him. To believe in God is to believe in his existence – or rather, in His. (Or Hers, granted, though not in the world of the Psalms.)

"I of course replied": I of course did not reply (in / Believe in You) to those who deride and who are false friends. "So I chaffed them and I gaily laughed"? No, they chafed me and I didn't laugh. Yet the world of Jerome Kern may meet the world of the Psalms even here: "laughing friends deride" may combine with "my friends stand aloof" (Psalms 38:11) to precipitate "though my friends forsake me".

I Believe In You cannot but bring to mind the words that it never says: "Smoke gets in your eyes". And even there it may remember, too, the righteous, summoned by the Book of Proverbs 10:25-7.

The righteous is an everlasting foundation. As vinegar to. the teeth, and as smoke to the eyes, so is the sluggard to them that send him. The fear of the LORD prolongeth days: but the years of the wicked shall be shortened.


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PostPosted: Sun October 16th, 2011, 14:17 GMT 
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I'd rate it as a 2nd tier Bob Dylan song. Which is really good by the way. For me it doesn't quite stand up with songs like "Blind willie Mctell" or "You're a big girl now". It's on the next level down, but still a very good song. Did he do this on Saturday night live? There's a version of this I really love, and i'm thinking it was from SNL, but not sure.


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PostPosted: Sat March 16th, 2013, 18:32 GMT 
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registeredtovote wrote:
Hey, I was just listening to this old showtune by Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach.
"Smoke Gets in Your Eyes."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oipCyU5HYgU
Think it could have been an inspiration for I Believe in You? I do!
Reggie

P.S. Platters version - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57tK6aQS_H0


I love the Platters version! Was thinking the same thing. On a similar note, The Ronettes have a song called "How Does it Feel?"
Also, "smoke gets in your eyes, you draw a smile" from "When the Night Comes Falling From the Sky."


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PostPosted: Sun October 20th, 2013, 22:23 GMT 

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Location: City of Angels
'I believe in you.
This overtly religious song has an interesting sub-plot, the issue of rejection, of being the outsider. It is the theme that every artist (perhaps except Shakespeare and Beethoven) must suffer from at some stage – the rejection by those that don’t quite understand what the hell is going on inside the artist’s head.
So the artist steps back and to sustain his sense of self-belief, has a choice. Either he gives up, or he continues to believe in what he has done, or he believes in something else which is thought to be guiding him on.
Thus it is with Dylan, who has had many criticisms from questions about the quality of his vocals to his “right” to go electric, from his abandonment of the music of civil rights and revolt to the music of surrealism, to his decision to become a born-again Christian and (following the teaching) to tell the world about it.
Listening to the song and hearing it as a non-religious piece is a revelation in itself. Just because Dylan meant it as a hymn and a confession doesn’t mean that this is how it has to be. True, the religiosity is ultimately overwhelming, but as a love song it would be so utterly beautiful. To have that sung to you would surely be the greatest tribute...'
Tony Atwood
http://bob-dylan.org.uk/

The very last time Bob performed this song was a very interesting concert. He opened with Gotta Serve Somebody. Further on down the set, he pulls out a stunning Every Grain Of Sand. Then as the final song before the standard encores, this song. It's an incredibly strong performance and feels as if Bob had been doing it every night prior to this.....maybe he had, just not on stage.

Saarbrucken Germany
April 5 2009
http://www.sendspace.com/file/xj0emh


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PostPosted: Sun October 20th, 2013, 22:38 GMT 
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Ahhhh, thanks for that, Marker!


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PostPosted: Mon October 21st, 2013, 02:35 GMT 
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Thanks, marker. I hadn't heard that one. Very nice. I wish that the Toronto concert from 1980 was still on You Tube--amazing. I recall a pretty wild one from 1994--Cologne, I think.

marker wrote:
The very last time Bob performed this song was a very interesting concert. He opened with Gotta Serve Somebody. Further on down the set, he pulls out a stunning Every Grain Of Sand. Then as the final song before the standard encores, this song. It's an incredibly strong performance and feels as if Bob had been doing it every night prior to this.....maybe he had, just not on stage.


Wow--must have been a Sunday, huh?


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PostPosted: Mon October 21st, 2013, 05:25 GMT 
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Pretty decent song. I've mostly heard it live

Not one of my favorites, but I wouldn't say I dislike it.


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PostPosted: Mon October 21st, 2013, 05:39 GMT 
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This song's live debut was October 20, 1979 on Saturday Night Live on the day my girlfriend of the past 17 plus years was born with Gotta Serve Somebody and When You Gonna Wake Up. That was 34 years ago today. I've only been familiar with this song for the past 4 or 5 years but it will always hold a special place in my heart and I find it beautiful in every way (just like the love of my life.) :D


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