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PostPosted: Fri September 16th, 2016, 04:12 GMT 

Joined: Thu August 4th, 2016, 19:22 GMT
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1965
“I dig John. As a writer, a singer, and a Beatle. There are very few people I dig every time I meet them, but him I dig. He doesn’t take things so seriously as so many guys do. I like that.”

1966
Mr. Jones: What about the material of Lennon-McCartney?
Dylan: Great! They started it all in England – they are honest, sincere in their own way.

1977
Mr. Jones: How about the Beatles?
Dylan: I’ve always liked the way George Harrison plays guitar—restrained and good. As for Lennon, well, I was encouraged by his book ["In His Own Write"]. Or the publishers were encouraged, because they asked me to write a book and that’s how "Tarantula" came about. John has taken poetics pretty far in popular music. A lot of his work is overlooked, but if you examine it, you’ll find key expressions that have never been said before to push across his point of view. Things that are symbolic of some inner reality and probably will never be said again.

1981
Mr. Jones: Did anybody actually ask you about John Lennon’s death?
Dylan: No, they didn’t ask me anything...
Mr. Jones: But will you talk about that?
Dylan: I don’t know, you know, what can you say? He was actually killed by someone who supposedly loved him. But what kind of love is that? That was hero worship in a mad kind of way.
Mr. Jones: Did that scare you?
Dylan: No, because I don’t write those kind of songs John Lennon wrote. “Imagine”. I never liked that song, I mean, I know it was a good song. He wrote one song, “Mother.” ‘Mother, you had me; I never had you.' That’s a very personal kind of song It hits somebody in a special kind of way. I can’t even relate to it.

1992
Elliot Mintz interview, Los Angeles, California

On November 22nd, 1992, I sat down with Bob Dylan to talk about his new album, ‘Good As I Been To You.’ In the process, we got to chatting about John Lennon.

EM: Twelve years now after John’s passing... A long time to examine the body of work and what he left behind musically. What do you think his most significant contribution was to rock n’ roll... as an artist?

BD: He was talented as a musician which you don’t see... It’s just like another one of those things... People don’t give him credit for saying something that takes over... It’s like personality takes over at a certain point. To me, he could play and he sang great. And he had the attitude of course. You know, it’s hard to separate what he did as a Beatle, because the attitude was there that he had. To me it was the same attitude earlier on before he did the primal therapy thing and came out. To me, he was always a musician first. Like, to me, his version of “Stand By Me” is the version regardless of the song’s been done so many times, but his was better than the original. All this stuff was like that. It had an attack to it, you know, that is very rare. Of course, when he put his own thing behind it, it was quite overwhelming. With is “Working Class Hero” –type thing and “Instant Karma” kind of thing... To me, it was all just a... you know, you could hear it all there with “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” but then of course, the harmonies and that stuff had kind of deluded a lot of it. But if you’re asking me how he is perceived, to me he is perceived first and foremost as a musician. And he had an amazing sense of melody, and lyrically he was no slouch, either.

EM: He used to say, in the public statements or recorded statements, he used to say that every time the two of you bumped into each other, from his point of view, he was always kind of paranoid and nervous.

BD: (yawns)

EM: Did you get that sensation from him?

BD: No. He never gave me that impression.

EM: He felt that there was always kind of like a healthy rivalry between the two of you.

BD: Yeah,

(cut in the recording)

-- it was never like one of those that kind of things where we got Brian Wilson we gotta beat that record, we gotta beat this record, and then they’re coming back and they’re making another one only to make it a Sgt Pepper, you know, whatever. To me, that kind of thing never really existed. Maybe for those other guys it did, because they were all fighting for chart positions and things. Coming from my world of the folk music world that never really entered into any element of trying to better somebody else. Trying to make this recording better than that recording, this was all records. Those guys went to the recording element of everything and it wasn’t my scene, so it never was really a competitive thing.

---(commercial break)---

BD: What lasts for me in that is the songs he left.

EM: Do you have a favorite?

BD: Not really a favorite. There are some that jump out of me more than others; “Nowhere Man”. One of my favorites, don’t ask me why, is “Mother." He was doing it all the way.

EM: He had some moments where he took so me good-natured kidding with you and your approach. Did it bother you?

BD: No, one of my old drummers, he used to play me a tape where he was like spoofing “Serve Somebody” or something like that. No, it didn’t bother me, it intrigued me. Why would it effect him such a way? Like who cares? It was just a song.

EM: I wondered if about that, too, if that really did impact him. I also think he personally loved and tried to imitated your voice. You know, it was just something that he would fall into frequently. He just enjoyed the experience. And over the years, people have sometimes asked me whether or not that ever bothered you of it you took offense at that?

BD: No, not really.

EM: When you think back about him now. Beside the music, was there anything particularly endearing or special that he’d left you with? Some people say it was the humor, some people say it was the cynicism, some people say it was that edge that he...

BD: He was very quick-witted, wasn’t he?

EM: Yeah.

BD: Like a lot of those English guys were just so sharp for sure.

EM: You never recorded with him, did you?

BD: Once, but no one never come up with the tape.

EM: I guess there was a great rock n’ roll rumor that the two of you actually made a tape together.

BD: No, those were... That is all pretty shaky in my mind. What happened and what didn’t happen, but it seems to me there was a tape running at his house. Where was it again?

EM: Kenwood or Tittenhurst Park?

BD: Yeah, that one. Seems to me he had a tape recorder.

EM: Did you record when you were singing?

BD: Probably some kind of things It might’ve been Gene Vincent songs or something.

EM: Oh, if anybody knows where the tape is we’d love to hear from them. It’d be a nice thing to have, wouldn’t it?

BD: (pause) Yeah.

EM: Anything else come to you about John?

BD: Ah, he was just a wonderful guy, really. Well, you know – cool. Anything from me that I could say is that he was a kind of a wonderful guy, but he was, speaking as a musician, he was someone to look up to.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


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PostPosted: Fri September 16th, 2016, 12:09 GMT 
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Thanks for those, a nice read.


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PostPosted: Fri September 16th, 2016, 12:54 GMT 
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BD: No, one of my old drummers, he used to play me a tape where he was like spoofing “Serve Somebody” or something like that. No, it didn’t bother me, it intrigued me. Why would it effect him such a way? Like who cares? It was just a song.

And there it is folks. Why be bothered about anything?


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PostPosted: Fri September 16th, 2016, 13:19 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 25th, 2007, 21:54 GMT
Posts: 1726
ApocalypseKurtz wrote:
BD: No, one of my old drummers, he used to play me a tape where he was like spoofing “Serve Somebody” or something like that. No, it didn’t bother me, it intrigued me. Why would it effect him such a way? Like who cares? It was just a song.

And there it is folks. Why be bothered about anything?


Imagine there's no religion, pretty simple. Dylan has it right, though, Lennon's about the unique vocal "attack" and the melodies. And clearly Dylan's only concerned with charts once in a while (when he talks to the record company).


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PostPosted: Fri September 16th, 2016, 23:32 GMT 
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Someone should ask Bob what its like being interviewed by a ghoul like Elliot Mintz.


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PostPosted: Sat September 17th, 2016, 01:07 GMT 

Joined: Thu August 4th, 2016, 19:22 GMT
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chester drawers wrote:
Someone should ask Bob what its like being interviewed by a ghoul like Elliot Mintz.


If anybody wonders why somebody might call Elliot Mintz the g-word, watch a few seconds of this:

https://youtu.be/y9TWLTsObvQ?t=3285


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PostPosted: Sat September 17th, 2016, 07:19 GMT 
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Thanks for this. Seems like Dylan had a far higher opinion of Lennon than a lot of people on this forum.

And he's absolutely right about Lennon's Stand By Me being the best offering of them all. Just as his Twist and Shout blew the Isley Brothers original out of the water.


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PostPosted: Sat September 17th, 2016, 14:28 GMT 
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Location: Morrisville, PA
Mona Bond wrote:
chester drawers wrote:
Someone should ask Bob what its like being interviewed by a ghoul like Elliot Mintz.


If anybody wonders why somebody might call Elliot Mintz the g-word, watch a few seconds of this:

https://youtu.be/y9TWLTsObvQ?t=3285


That is it.
That is the ghoul.

Thank you, Mona Bond !


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PostPosted: Sun September 18th, 2016, 04:23 GMT 
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That was a nice summary of quotes, thanks. What I like about it is how Dylan keeps coming back to how John was mainly a musician.


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PostPosted: Sun February 25th, 2018, 14:18 GMT 

Joined: Wed January 17th, 2018, 14:57 GMT
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Addendum from 2007

Grim Limo Leak: You also have a song about John Lennon, "Roll On John," on this album. What moved you to record this now?

Dylan: I can't remember – I just felt like doing it, and now would be as good a time as any. I wasn't even sure that song fit on this record. I just took a chance and stuck it on there. I think I might've finished it to include it. It's not like it was just written yesterday. I started practicing it late last year on some stages.

Grim Limo Leak: Lennon said that he was inspired by you, but also felt competitive with you. You and Lennon were cultural lions in the 1960s and 1970s. Did that ever make for unease or for a sense of competition in each other's company?

Dylan: I think we covered peers a while back, did we not? John came from the northern regions of Britain. The hinterlands. Just like I did in America, so we had some kind of environmental things in common. Both places were pretty isolated. Though mine was more landlocked than his. But everything is stacked against you when you come from that. You have to have the talent to overcome everything. That was something I had in common with him. We were all about the same age and heard the same exact things growing up. Our paths crossed at a certain time, and we both had faced a lot of adversity. We even had that in common. I wish that he was still here because we could talk about a lot of things now.

Grim Limo Leak: You went to visit Liverpool, where Lennon grew up. How long ago was that?

Dylan: A couple years ago? Strawberry Field is right in back of his house. Didn't know that. Evidently, he grew up with his aunt. He'd be out there in the Strawberry Field, a park behind his house that was fenced off. Being in Britain, there's all this hanging history, chopping off heads. I mean, you grow up with that, if you're a Brit. I didn't quite understand the line about getting hung – "Nothing to get hung about" – well, time had moved on, it was like "hung up," nothing to be hung up about. But he was speaking literally: "What are you doing out there, John?" "Don't worry, Mum, nothing they're going to hang me about, nothing to get hung about." I found that kind of interesting.

Grim Limo Leak: In "Roll On John," there's a sense that Lennon was trapped in America, far away from home. Did you feel empathy for those experiences?

Dylan: How could you not? There's so much you can say about any person's life. It's endless, really. I just picked out stuff that I thought that I was close enough to, to understand.

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