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PostPosted: Fri August 3rd, 2018, 23:25 GMT 
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He has earned every right to do what he wants.

Having said that, my 2 cents is my least favorite Dylan albums/periods are, in order are:


1. Sinatra stuff-least favorite
2. Self Portrait stuff
3. Gospel- Some good stuff here I admit


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PostPosted: Fri August 3rd, 2018, 23:36 GMT 
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Loved Shadows. Great sound. Love his covers. Angels and Triple too far. Other types of covers yes.


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PostPosted: Sat August 4th, 2018, 01:11 GMT 

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Of his 36 studio albums, these 3 get the least play by me.

When I was 18, I didn't really like JWH. I love it now.
Before I was married, I really didn't "get" the love for BOTT as much as I do now.
I'm 41 now. I might need another decade or two before these 3 albums grow on me. lol


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PostPosted: Sat August 4th, 2018, 06:16 GMT 
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Narrow Way wrote:
He has earned every right to do what he wants.

Having said that, my 2 cents is my least favorite Dylan albums/periods are, in order are:


1. Sinatra stuff-least favorite
2. Self Portrait stuff
3. Gospel- Some good stuff here I admit

With me it's not quite as clear cut as that, I much prefer Shadows In The Night to Saved or Shot, but I probably like Slow Train more than Shadows! However, when you put Triplicate in the mix it turns everything upside down - it was just too much for me to take!


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PostPosted: Sat August 4th, 2018, 06:31 GMT 
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TheBoiledGutsofBirds wrote:
Of his 36 studio albums, these 3 get the least play by me.

When I was 18, I didn't really like JWH. I love it now.
Before I was married, I really didn't "get" the love for BOTT as much as I do now.
I'm 41 now. I might need another decade or two before these 3 albums grow on me. lol


Worst advert for ageing ever.


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PostPosted: Sat August 4th, 2018, 07:07 GMT 
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shipcomesin wrote:
Listening to Dylan’s version of ‘He’s Funny That Way’ and the Lisbon show, I was wondering what people thought of the ‘Sinatra period’ and its effect on his art in retrospect. Maligned by some, a late-career triumph for others. Personally, I thinks it's brought great freshness, experimentation & certainly reviving Bob’s sense of humour. Any thoughts?


Shadows/Angels/Triplicate are some of Dylan's best albums. Like the bluegrass songs he played in concert between 1997 and 2002 the standards proved to be a well of inspiration that Dylan explored thoroughly before moving on. Unfortunately he did not release five albums of bluegrass covers at the time.


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PostPosted: Sat August 4th, 2018, 07:51 GMT 

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Liked it, thought Triplicate was bit of an overkill, seems like it's over.
Hopefully next album is full of original Dylan songs.


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PostPosted: Sat August 4th, 2018, 08:19 GMT 

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TheBoiledGutsofBirds wrote:
Of his 36 studio albums, these 3 get the least play by me.

When I was 18, I didn't really like JWH. I love it now.
Before I was married, I really didn't "get" the love for BOTT as much as I do now.
I'm 41 now. I might need another decade or two before these 3 albums grow on me. lol
Well I'm 64, and I love the Sinatra albums, so you could be right. And Triplicate is my favourite of the three.


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PostPosted: Sat August 4th, 2018, 08:26 GMT 

Joined: Fri January 5th, 2007, 23:38 GMT
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Location: Ireland
TheBoiledGutsofBirds wrote:
Of his 36 studio albums, these 3 get the least play by me.

When I was 18, I didn't really like JWH. I love it now.
Before I was married, I really didn't "get" the love for BOTT as much as I do now.
I'm 41 now. I might need another decade or two before these 3 albums grow on me. lol


Great perspective.


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PostPosted: Sat August 4th, 2018, 08:34 GMT 

Joined: Sat October 3rd, 2009, 13:47 GMT
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McG wrote:
TheBoiledGutsofBirds wrote:
Of his 36 studio albums, these 3 get the least play by me.

When I was 18, I didn't really like JWH. I love it now.
Before I was married, I really didn't "get" the love for BOTT as much as I do now.
I'm 41 now. I might need another decade or two before these 3 albums grow on me. lol


Worst advert for ageing ever.

:lol:
let's stay forever young


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PostPosted: Tue August 7th, 2018, 00:02 GMT 

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"Triplicate" is like a contemporaneously released Bootleg Series album. We can hardly fault the guy for recording in such quantities, as history proves he's always done this; this time we're just not waiting 20-40 years to hear what he left behind. What is it about the passage of time that makes three discs' worth of old material feel like a gift while three discs' worth of new material feels like an indulgence?


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PostPosted: Tue August 7th, 2018, 07:22 GMT 
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My only wish with Triplicate is for Bob to stick the Coltrane intro to "My one and only love" on it. It's sublime. I'd die a happy woman if Bob played his own version on harp sometime.


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PostPosted: Tue August 7th, 2018, 08:47 GMT 

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I didn't like Shadows in the Night when I first heard it, but I gave Fallen Angels a chance and, to my surprise, loved it instantly. That made me revisit Shadows, which I ended up loving too. Triplicate might be my favourite of the bunch. If someone had told me in 2012 that Bob would be singing that well in 2017, I never would have believed them. It was a pleasure to see Bob sing some of these songs live at the show I saw last year.

Perhaps even better, this whole project of Bob's has been gateway to discovering other great artists like Frank, Tony Bennett, Ella Fitzgerald and many more, and to jazz in general, which I had had difficulty getting into before. I've enjoyed this period immensely, and I can't wait to see what Bob will do next.


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 02:45 GMT 
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I bought them but have barely played them.
It was his choice and he has the right to record what he wants.
If he recorded the Gettysburg Address or the first page of the telephone book people would still buy it and say what wonderful qualities and interpretation he brings to these works.


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 02:50 GMT 
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oldmanemu wrote:
If he recorded the Gettysburg Address or the first page of the telephone book people would still buy it and say what wonderful qualities and interpretation he brings to these works.

But, didn't you hear the nuanced way he pronounced Ashbrook with the emphasis on the second syllable!?


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 03:34 GMT 
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Knocking the "sinatra period" while somehow defending things like Knocked out loaded seems to be the in thing.


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 06:06 GMT 
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Desolation Row wrote:
Knocking the "sinatra period" while somehow defending things like Knocked out loaded seems to be the in thing.


I guess that's just each to their own, and it's not as clear cut as that for me. I love Shadows In The Night, thought Fallen Angels was okay (with some fantastic tracks) but largely not as good as Shadows and not as important, don't really like Triplicate as a whole (I do like some individual tracks, The Best Is Yet To Come is really very good), don't like most of Knocked Out Loaded (apart from You Wanna Ramble, Under Your Spell and Brownsville Girl (although the outtake New Danville Girl was better IMO)), and enjoy most of Down In The Groove apart from Death Is Not The End which is the worst song he ever wrote I think. So I would imagine their would be a wide range of diverse opinions about those releases.


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 07:06 GMT 

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Personally, I'm quite grateful for the albums because they introduced me to dozens of "standard" songs I'd never heard before. I'm 30, and lots of these songs really make me appreciate the music of that period. They peaked my interest, and now I'm looking up other versions, and getting more into pre rock & roll music.

I'm not much of a Sinatra fan, but other versions by jazz vocalists like Billie Holiday or Sarah Vaughan really captivate me. I listen to these albums most in the fall. While walking my dog, looking at the New England leaves, I find the songs calming and reflective. I can see myself returning to these albums often as I age.


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 08:21 GMT 
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They're really just not albums I can stay focused on for that long. Like if I put them on they just become very pleasant background music. Dylan's voice and the wonderful instrumentation makes them a nicer listen in some ways than the usual treatments these standards get but they're very much dinner table music. They're really odd in Dylan's discography because they don't really infuriate, baffle or challenge; they're just nice little albums and not much more.

Did they improve the live shows? Doubt it; the shift happened in 2013.


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 08:28 GMT 
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boiledgutsofbirds wrote:
They're really just not albums I can stay focused on for that long. Like if I put them on they just become very pleasant background music. Dylan's voice and the wonderful instrumentation makes them a nicer listen in some ways than the usual treatments these standards get but they're very much dinner table music. They're really odd in Dylan's discography because they don't really infuriate, baffle or challenge; they're just nice little albums and not much more.

Did they improve the live shows? Doubt it; the shift happened in 2013.

At one stage I heard that he had included some of those songs in concert. So about 6 weeks ago I listened to them agin just in case. Imagine my pleasure when I found he was returning to his songs.


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 14:25 GMT 
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boiledgutsofbirds wrote:
They're really just not albums I can stay focused on for that long. Like if I put them on they just become very pleasant background music. Dylan's voice and the wonderful instrumentation makes them a nicer listen in some ways than the usual treatments these standards get but they're very much dinner table music. They're really odd in Dylan's discography because they don't really infuriate, baffle or challenge; they're just nice little albums and not much more.

Did they improve the live shows? Doubt it; the shift happened in 2013.


I think they did improve the live shows. At least, at first, he seemed to take great care when singing the standards.
Seemed to improve the rest of the show around them as well. At least at the shows I attended.
And I say this, as not a big fan of these albums. I love some of these songs, but if I'm in the mood to hear them,
I'd sooner listen to Frank or Ella, or Tony Bennett sing them...


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PostPosted: Wed August 15th, 2018, 23:40 GMT 
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Basically he recorded and performed the songs because he had always liked them. Nothing more, nothing less.


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PostPosted: Thu August 16th, 2018, 01:09 GMT 
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oldmanemu wrote:
Basically he recorded and performed the songs because he had always liked them. Nothing more, nothing less.
True, but over the years he has liked blues, bluegrass, folk, gospel, rock & roll, many kinds of songs as well.
Guess that he got around to focus on these should not be a big deal.


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PostPosted: Thu August 16th, 2018, 09:17 GMT 
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ragman99 wrote:
oldmanemu wrote:
Basically he recorded and performed the songs because he had always liked them. Nothing more, nothing less.
True, but over the years he has liked blues, bluegrass, folk, gospel, rock & roll, many kinds of songs as well.
Guess that he got around to focus on these should not be a big deal.

But I doubt the Sinatra period will feature in concert, like the other ones do.


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PostPosted: Thu August 16th, 2018, 21:20 GMT 
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mikesnyc wrote:
.../...
These songs will live on, long after so much else has fallen away, and its great to see Bob exploring them. I hope those heady and sophisticated melodic changes make their way to a new set of originals, the way the essence of those two folk albums 'good as i been to you' and 'world gone wrong' informed the creative rebirth of 'time out of mind', but i guess we'll see.....

I just hope he will not try to write song with so many chords.
I dream he will return to 2 or 3 chord ballads + a few rockers. He may try the ballads with soft crooning voice, why not.

Narrow Way wrote:
When Bob was labeled a folk singer, he rocked at Newport. When he was labeled Lucifer for rocking out, he told them they were a liars and he put out some nice country albums. A secular liberal? That was answered by Slow Train Coming and the other two. His critics then claimed ok, he is a great writer but can't sing. So he sings Sinatra and proves them wrong again.

Now that half of the world try to prove the other half that he actually deserves the Nobel prize, he might return with his notebook full of Wiggle Wiggle-like songs :D

About that thread's question: I hardly listened to two or three song from Shadow and left him live his life without me. I'm fully unable to assess, I feel fully aside from that era. If that was nostalgia, he should rather have covered rockabilly numbers such as Billy Lee Riley.


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