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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 02:19 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 16th, 2008, 21:48 GMT
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One of The Mez's all time favorites. Love the studio track and the live 75 most. This one everyone must love I would think? Anybody think its overrated? Blasphemy to say so, but everyone entitled to their opinions. I'd expect many dates & posts of some great renditions of this treasure. So lets hear it all for the track talk series & one of his very best! MEZ


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 02:54 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 5th, 2006, 18:41 GMT
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I didn't like it for the longest time, but now I do. Reading Joyce Carol Oates' writings about the song was interesting.


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 02:56 GMT 

Joined: Sat May 23rd, 2009, 23:52 GMT
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One of his enduring classics & it still moves me no matter how many hundreds of times I hear it. I like Birmingham, '65 a lot too.


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 03:38 GMT 
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Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
You must leave now, take what you need, you think will last.
But whatever you wish to keep, you better grab it fast.
Yonder stands your orphan with his gun,
Crying like a fire in the sun.
Look out all the saints are comin' through
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.

The highway is for gamblers, better use your sense.
Take what you have gathered from coincidence.
The empty-handed painter from your street
Is drawing crazy patterns on your sheets.
This sky, too, is folding under you
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.

All your seasick sailors, they are rowing home.
Your empty-handed armies, they are going home.
The lover who just walked out your door
Has taken all his blankets from the floor.
The carpet, too, is moving under you
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.

Leave your stepping stones behind, there's something that calls for you.
Forget the dead you've left, they will not follow you.
The vagabond who's rapping at your door
Is standing in the clothes that you once wore.
Strike another match, go start anew
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.


Regardless of what Dylan was or wasn't thinking when he wrote it, the song has become the great signifier of change and transition. It's responsible for the history of the song always getting altered to fit the mythology -- the great story is told and retold, decade after decade, how Dylan, after being booed off the stage at Newport for "going electric", returned, acoustic guitar in hand, and played this one last song, thus ending what Van Ronk lovingly called "The Great Folk Scare" once and for all.

Like most stories intimately tied up with significant cultural myths, trainspotters who leap up and start shouting the "That's not what happened!" miss the point.

All "lists" of "Bob's 25 best songs!" are fundamentally silly exercises, but any list that doesn't have this on it gets extra silly points. :)


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 05:50 GMT 

Joined: Mon March 30th, 2009, 23:08 GMT
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Simple, poignant and powerful.


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 17:39 GMT 
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You said it LJ. It's awful.


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 20:42 GMT 

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Fantastic song; I love best the two ways that nature around the narrator is trying to get him to go: the sky and the carpet combining to throw him further on.


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 21:24 GMT 
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Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
Pauley wrote:
You said it LJ. It's awful.


http://www.readingcomprehensionconnecti ... lesson.php


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 21:32 GMT 
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It's one of my all time favorites too.
"...and it's all over now, baby blue"
Like my signature used to say "and everyday you have to die some, cry some and die" (Lou Reed).
Everyday, now... it's always now. This song makes me feel like if time didn't exist...


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PostPosted: Fri June 26th, 2009, 23:52 GMT 
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This always struck me as a melody from the Protestant Reformation. Not that the words aren't cool.


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PostPosted: Sat June 27th, 2009, 06:06 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
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Location: City of Angels
As Paul Williams says, one singer could sing it a thousand different ways
and it would never lose its power.
And personally I've heard the song a million times and it's meant something different each time.
In my opinion it's Dylan's greatest closer.
It is a song of action, a song of reflection, and a song of warning.
Nine times out of ten, it'll be my favorite...

My favorite cover's by the Country Gentlemen (as perfect as anyone's...except Bob)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yrgo31S74Qo

As for Bob, it's one of the only songs of his that I think his current voice is more appropriate than any.
It now sounds like a song created at the beginning of time being sung by the singer who sounds as old as time.
I especially fell in love with this song in 2003, a year of unexpected change. The beautiful slide guitar, the banging chords of Bob's piano, the out-of-breath, upsung vocals. Loved it. Inspired chaos. Everyone else's has become meaningless for me since 2003.
Here's a particular favorite version of mine from Oslo with a gorgeous harp solo to cap it off:
Oct. 13, 2003

http://www.humyo.com/F/9546317-743160751


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PostPosted: Sat June 27th, 2009, 14:11 GMT 
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Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
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PostPosted: Sun June 28th, 2009, 21:38 GMT 

Joined: Wed June 25th, 2008, 22:49 GMT
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Location: Joliet, IL, USA
This song i never tire of.. it's always good. By bob or a cover version. A True classic.


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PostPosted: Sun June 28th, 2009, 22:03 GMT 

Joined: Wed June 10th, 2009, 02:32 GMT
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I was a cross-country trucker when I learned this song...it was a good-bye to the blue-eyed race as rulers of the States, in my opinion...we are going to get what's coming to us, I heard...and we did, and are, though Joan Baez told us he wrote the song after being refused entry to a hotel based on his appearance...it's still a recognition of the karma coming our way, but that's just how it fit over my window


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 13:25 GMT 
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For me, It's All Over Now, Baby Blue is a song whose potential has never been realized. The tune is fine, the lyrics are fine, but it rarely does anything for me...whether record or live it just never seems to measure up. The only version(s) that I find interesting is from the Rolling Thunder Review era.

It's All Over Now, Baby Blue is the lone exception to my oft tested, scientifically proven observations that every 60s song Bob has played during the Never Ending Tour, he's done 1000 times better than the original studio version. The NET versions for this song end up falling a little short of that, coming in around, say, about 612 times better than the original.

It is a song with great potential but even on the Spring 2004 tour with Freddy Koella and Larry Campbell on guitars, it never rises to the levels one would expect. I'm sorry to say I have no explanation for it. It just seems to never go anywhere.

Testing for further verification's sake continues...


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 17:20 GMT 
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Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
With a tumor the size of a regulation volley ball in your head I'm not surprised.


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 19:54 GMT 
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It's one of the 10 or so other-dimensional (or...extra-universal?!) classics of Dylan's 60's material.

The delicacy of the live '66 versions, though, for me top all the others - the rhythmic, urgent flair and the way he at times seems to loose the harmonica solos...just to bring it back in time!


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 20:03 GMT 
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This song is forever tainted, for me, by Bob's rendition (directed at Donovan) on "Don't Look Back".


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 20:21 GMT 
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Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
Opening with STHSB, BIABH starts off with the shout “It used to go like that, now it goes like this” which is kind of an aggressive way of saying “things have changed.” But the album ends on a more melancholy note, as if Dylan accepts that his exit from the Folk/Protest Pantheon can never be that easy. Hearing this the first time in the swirling context of “Dylan has sold out!” and condemnations in Sing Out! magazine (with the wonderful reply from Johnny Cash who, at that time, hadn’t yet met Bob) and the story of how, after being booed from the stage at Newport, Dylan returned with an acoustic guitar and played this song and then left (true, not true, who cares) it is without question that when you heard this song at the end of the acoustic side of this record you heard it as the most eloquent “Dear John” letter of all time, from Bob to the folk community.

“You must leave now, take what you need, you think will last.
But whatever you wish to keep, you better grab it fast. . . . .
Look out the saints are comin' through
And it's all over now, Baby Blue.”


How many songs does this guy actually know? Who else takes “When the Saints Come Marchin’ In” and twists it into that line, “Look out now, the saints are comin' through….”? :shock:

Ancient New Orleans idiom music recycled as end of an era folk melancholia. :)

Jesus.

The thing that just knocks me off my feet is this endless parade of characters, all arising as if from the subconscious of the body of 20th century modernist literature. The list grows: the orphan with his gun (how do you cry “like a fire” anyway?), the empty-handed painter, seasick sailors, reindeer armies, and the vagabond who's rapping at your door.

Listen to the explosion of songwriters A.D. (After Dylan) as they all do their best to populate their songs with similar characters. Just off the top of my head, look at this cast of characters from “Blinded By the Night,” the opening track off Bruce Springsteen’s first album:

Madman drummers bummers and Indians in the summer (with a teenage diplomat), some all-hot half-shot, some fleshpot mascot, young Scott with a slingshot, some brimstone baritone anti-cyclone rolling stone preacher from the East, some new-mown chaperone, some fresh-sown moonstone, some silicone sister with her manager's mister, and Go-Cart Mozart, little Early-Pearly, some hazard from Harvard, and some kidnapped handicap. And, if there’s room, add Crazy Janey, her mission man, Wild Billy with his friend G-Man, Hazy Davy and Killer Joe (from the cast of “Spirits in the Night”).

What a thing.


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 20:28 GMT 
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Long Johnny wrote:
The thing that just knocks me off my feet is this endless parade of characters, all arising as if from the subconscious of the body of 20th century modernist literature. The list grows: the orphan with his gun (how do you cry “like a fire” anyway?), the empty-handed painter, seasick sailors, reindeer armies, and the vagabond who's rapping at your door.


I often wonder if Dylan was influenced a bit by the poetry of Robert Service, who would've been more in line with Woody Guthrie's America (contemporary-wise). Service populated his poetry with similar archetypes.
Check out some of his stuff here:
http://www.internal.org/list_poems.phtml?authorID=10


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 20:35 GMT 

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Long Johnny wrote:
How many songs does this guy actually know? Who else takes “When the Saints Come Marchin’ In” and twists it into that line, “Look out now, the saints are comin' through….”? :shock:

Ancient New Orleans idiom music recycled as end of an era folk melancholia. :)

Jesus.


:lol:

When The Saints Go Marching In had been an American standard for over thirty years when Bob was writing It's All Over Now, Baby Blue.

Long Johnny, great viewer of the Emperor's clothes, standard bearer for the status quo!


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 22:04 GMT 
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bottle of bread wrote:
Long Johnny wrote:
The thing that just knocks me off my feet is this endless parade of characters, all arising as if from the subconscious of the body of 20th century modernist literature. The list grows: the orphan with his gun (how do you cry “like a fire” anyway?), the empty-handed painter, seasick sailors, reindeer armies, and the vagabond who's rapping at your door.


I often wonder if Dylan was influenced a bit by the poetry of Robert Service, who would've been more in line with Woody Guthrie's America (contemporary-wise). Service populated his poetry with similar archetypes.
Check out some of his stuff here:
http://www.internal.org/list_poems.phtml?authorID=10


The Wiki entry has one really interesting line that immediately made me think of Dylan, though it has nothing to do with whether Service might be an influence:

"His writing was so expressive that his readers took him for a hard-bitten old Klondike prospector, not the later-arriving bank clerk he actually was."

:shock:

Or, "His performances were so expressive that listeners took him for a Gutheir-esque character who'd spent a long life on the road, and not the Jewish middle-class son of a Minnesota appliance salesman."

In US high school Englich classes in the 1950s-1960s students were exposed to a very wide menu of classic World Lit including some contemporary writers. Kids who enjoyed it had no difficulty finding more.


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 22:11 GMT 
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I think of it as a song describing the time of the end after the bomb had been dropped . Ity has very powerful moving imagery.


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 22:16 GMT 
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oldmanemu wrote:
I think of it as a song describing the time of the end after the bomb had been dropped . Ity has very powerful moving imagery.


I never thought of it that way before. It becomes sort of another version of "Walk Me Out in the Morning Dew." Nice.


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PostPosted: Tue November 17th, 2009, 22:33 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 6th, 2009, 01:56 GMT
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Robert Heitman wrote:
I was a cross-country trucker when I learned this song...it was a good-bye to the blue-eyed race as rulers of the States, in my opinion...we are going to get what's coming to us, I heard...and we did, and are, though Joan Baez told us he wrote the song after being refused entry to a hotel based on his appearance...it's still a recognition of the karma coming our way, but that's just how it fit over my window


I thought that was 'When The Ship Comes In'... Could be a brain fart though.


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