Expecting Rain

Go to main page
It is currently Mon October 15th, 2018, 13:01 GMT

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 372 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon May 22nd, 2017, 05:50 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
Wvalebe wrote:
A few months back, I worked on a project to compile a "complete electric set' with footage from the different European shows, using "Eat The Document", "No Direction Home" and "The 1966 Live Recordings: The Untold Story Behind The Recordings " as sources, combined with photos and film stills from that magnificent European tour. There is footage and sometimes audio mixed in from other shows too which can be confusing. A download will be in the works within the following week. It would be beyond fantastic if the film from the tour was released in the same way as The Live 1966 Recordings as there seems to be a fair amount of film from individual shows. Unfortunately much more work would have to be put into such a set, acquiring the rights etc.).

- Tell Me Mama - Paris, France
- I Don’t Believe You - Cardiff, Wales
- Baby Let Me Follow You Down - Newcastle, England
- Just Like Tom Thumbs Blues - Belfast, Ireland; Newcastle, England; Paris, France
- Leopard Skin Pill Box Hat - Dublin, Ireland
- One Too Many Mornings - Liverpool, England
- Ballad Of A Thin Man - Belfast, Ireland; Glasgow, Scotland, Edinburgh; England
- Like A Rolling Stone - Manchester, England; Newcastle, England; Edinburgh, England


Thanks for this - sounds interesting. Odd decision to avoid the Newcastle Ballad Of A Thin Man; and anything from the first London show. But I'm looking forward to seeing it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 23rd, 2017, 06:51 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Wed December 16th, 2009, 12:57 GMT
Posts: 1125
Get out here, Somebody naked, you lazy scoundrel. No updates since sunday? We´re approaching the grand finale! I know there are no concerts until 24th Paris, but surely stuff happened here in between? when did he fly to Paris? 22nd, 23rd? Also, the 24th was his 25th birthday. Any testimonies from Mickey Jones about searching for cakes and candles on parisiennes pattiseries? Strippers hired?
Any other groupies shagged?

Speak up!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 23rd, 2017, 07:23 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
wormington wrote:
Get out here, Somebody naked, you lazy scoundrel. No updates since sunday? We´re approaching the grand finale! I know there are no concerts until 24th Paris, but surely stuff happened here in between? when did he fly to Paris? 22nd, 23rd? Also, the 24th was his 25th birthday. Any testimonies from Mickey Jones about searching for cakes and candles on parisiennes pattiseries? Strippers hired?
Any other groupies shagged?

Speak up!


Of course: you're right. I've been taking a fortuitously-timed break to obsess over Twin Peaks. I believe they flew to Paris on May 22nd. Cue standard idiotic press conference today, the 23rd - complete with puppet. Clips in NDH.

I'll be here bright and early tomorrow. Promise.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 23rd, 2017, 07:31 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Wed December 16th, 2009, 12:57 GMT
Posts: 1125
Somebody Naked wrote:
Of course: you're right. I've been taking a fortuitously-timed break to obsess over Twin Peaks. I believe they flew to Paris on May 22nd. Cue standard idiotic press conference today, the 23rd - complete with puppet. Clips in NDH.

I'll be here bright and early tomorrow. Promise.

That is by far the lousiest chronicle you´ve done to date. The many compliments received have clearly gone up to your head :P

Sorry for the edginess, I haven´t had my coffee yet


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 23rd, 2017, 08:26 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
wormington wrote:
Somebody Naked wrote:
Of course: you're right. I've been taking a fortuitously-timed break to obsess over Twin Peaks. I believe they flew to Paris on May 22nd. Cue standard idiotic press conference today, the 23rd - complete with puppet. Clips in NDH.

I'll be here bright and early tomorrow. Promise.

That is by far the lousiest chronicle you´ve done to date. The many compliments received have clearly gone up to your head :P

Sorry for the edginess, I haven´t had my coffee yet


It's a very deliberate attempt to match Dylan's ennui in real time.

"I wanna get outta here as fast as you wanna get outta here..."

May 22nd:

Image

May 23rd:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lY4J61Rtz9U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3u9S0FY38-Y


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 23rd, 2017, 10:15 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Wed December 16th, 2009, 12:57 GMT
Posts: 1125
That´s a bit more like it ;)

Oh man, I still get baffled by the super odd questions he was asked in those days

Do you think you should the leader of singers with a message?
Why do you sing?


Must be pretty strange to be Dylan in general, but particularly in those days


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 23rd, 2017, 22:52 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
9pm, Tuesday 24th May, 1966. L'Olympia, Paris, France.


Image Image

After landing in Paris on May 22nd, Dylan was subjected to another surreal, inane press conference the following day; as seen in No Direction Home.

The show, on May 24th - Dylan's 25th birthday - is unlike anything else on the tour. It's chiefly notable as the one show where the acoustic set causes more consternation than the electric half.

Image

The audience, before Dylan even touches his guitar, are at the level that most crowds don't reach until the end of the electric set. Cheering, shouting, you name it. She Belongs To Me silences them initially. And well it should: it's stunning. The final vowel of "the law can't touch her at all" lingers beautifully. The harmonica playing is uniquely inventive.

More shouting; and more shouting at the shouting. A small, dedicated bunch strike up a rowdy chorus of "Happy birthday to you..."

Well, this is new. "Who is that...?" Dylan responds; half "what the hell?" and half "oh, you shouldn't have". And we're only one song in.

"Uh, this is a request...requesté..." He laughs at his own attempts to make up words that sound like French - "bon choi?" - and then settles on "er, 'request' song". Which, of course, it isn't: he's been playing it every night for months. But hey. He's in a playful mood. 4th Time Around seems on the verge of falling apart; but in a good way. Possibly it's the guitar that he's having trouble with.

"Er: havez-vous du boeuf?", which I guess is Dylan Franglais for "you got a problem?"

"Just what I thought".

If anyone should understand Visions Of Johanna, surely it's the French. This is the country of Rimbaud, after all; of Marcel Duchamp and the Dada moustache. It's the city of Mona Lisa inside the museum. This is how you do a song at four in the morning, after the mother of all parties, when only the most dedicated are still there, still awake or still alive. Again, his tentative guitar playing threatens to make it all come crashing down; but it makes him put more emphasis on his vocal rhythms - it's almost a cappella. And yet it's the guitar that doesn't know when to stop.

"Is there anybody out there that understands English?"

"YEAH!"

"Oh...that's wonderful; that's wonderful."

"We love you!"

"It gets so lonesome sometimes."

Guitar trouble. "Well, I try here. Uhhh. Oh, god..."

More guitar trouble. And, out of nowhere, he decides to discuss his command of the language.

"I was saying it all day in the halls today; I say it to the cab drivers...so I can say it. But, if I don't have to say it, I'd just as soon not, you know..."

Cheers for It's All Over Now, Baby Blue. They know this one. But, once again, the guitar Dylan's playing is threatening to undermine everything; like tightrope walking on a slack piece of string.

It's one of the more intimate-sounding concerts. At times, it sounds like Dylan's playing in a Greenwich Village coffee bar.

An decipherable heckle that sounds something like "Water big drink, please".

"Welll...I must keep drinking this water: it's hard to sing such a long song, I don't know if I can keep it up, you know. Great water here. Some of the best water in the world; I don't know if anybody has told anybody here that, but..."

"O-lympia...this is Olympia, huh? It's a very nice place, isn't it?"

The battle with this guitar is not one that he can win. Finally, that line he's been throwing out for months has found its true place: "You see, my electric guitar never goes out of tune". Ba-doom tish.

More applause for Desolation Row. A slightly knowing quality on the lines about Ophelia's 22nd birthday. And a premature fade out.

"This is a request; another request song. I often do a lot of request s...I can only do so many, now..."

Just Like A Woman starts. Sort of. "Whaaaat?" he incredulously wonders. This guitar seems to stay in tune for less than a minute at a time. He's getting tetchy now, and so are the audience.

"I'm doing this for you. I don't care...if you wanna hear it that way, I'll play it for you that way, you know?"

A heckle. In French.

"Ah, merci, merci...You just can't wait, can ya? Just can't wait...you have to go to work at ten o'clock, huh? Oh, it's a drag (for) me too, you know...that's folk music for you. Folk music, it does this all the time..."

This is getting ridiculous. No matter how hard he tries, this just sounds like one of those tiny children's guitars that never stays in tune. Anything would be better than this. Anything.

"...another guitar? Is there another guitar out there? Does anybody have another guitar? You have another guitar? Can I have your guitar? My guitar's broken; it broke on the way here...it's happened many times before: it's nothing to be alarmed about. Did you bring a magazine to read, or something?"

More jeers/cheers.

"Oh, I love you. You're all so wonderful."

"Do you have that guitar or not? You have it? D'you have a guitar? You said you had one. You were just...you were fooling me, huh? Well, I'll play this guitar, but I can't play it for you outta tune. I can't - I can't play this guitar for you outta tune. I'll put it in tune as soon as I can...in the meantime, you can...you can go to the bowling alley or something."

And then, a defiant and slightly patronising "It doesn't matter."

"Is it true that one...one Frenchman is worth a thousand lives? Is it?...I've always thought that..."

Nearly there. Maybe.

"Aw, come on - I wouldn't behave like this if I came to see you...I'm very sorry, but...ahhh.."

"Why must you...oh, don't be so bored, please. It's fun: just watch me tune it!...I'm trying to kill time; I wanna get outta here as fast as you wanna get outta here: I'm just trying to get this..."

A quick note about the mike for Richard Anderson; and finally, after nearly six minutes of fighting - and losing - with this agonisingly poor guitar: "Nobody feels any pain..."

After which, straight into Mr. Tambourine Man. Not going through that again. It's a measure of Dylan's talent that he can still produce a performance like that after all those problems. And, on a day when he must be more aware of the passing of time than on any other, he puts something extra into "Let me forget about today until tomorr....

...row..."

And he's off. Part Two awaits, after a Part One that seemed to go for hours.

For reasons best known to himself - satire, irony or just good old-fashioned provocation - Dylan had got hold of a massive American flag and had it draped over the upstage wall for the entire duration of the electric set (it's actually there in the first half: it’s visible in the acoustic set, in 66US at 9.43; but it’s better lit in the second half, and far more in the audience’s face). In both the remaining shows after this, he makes a point of telling his audience that this is American music that they're listening to. Maybe he was making the same point in Paris. But it's another thing that makes this show unique. And uniquely surreal.

Image

The electric set kicks off with all the force and precision of a locomotive. The Hawks are as tight as they’ve ever been. I can’t hear and anger or bile in these first two songs tonight: only confidence, celebration and a certain playfulness. Tell Me, Momma doesn't often sound like you could dance to it; but it does here. There's a beautiful melodic melancholy to Richard Manuel's piano. Dylan seems to be building a kind of wall around him, however. The intro to I Don't Believe You no longer sounds like he's trying to start a fight; merely that he expects one, and he can barely be bothered to show up for it. Also, bearing in mind that Dylan hasn't had a show in three days, his singing voice is exhausted. Things are really taking their toll.

Robbie Robertson plays some beautifully spiky guitar on Baby, Let Me Follow You Down. Dylan is starting to sound as bored of the Tom Thumb intro as I am. Inside the bubble, it's only done for his own amusement, seemingly; and it doesn't even do that any more. There are a couple of points in this show where he says something in between songs - or even in the middle of a song - that's purely for the benefit of the musicians: no one is allowed to penetrate the nucleus of this particular party any more.

On phrases like "I cannot move" or "I don't have the strength" his voice is shot - or "shaaaaaaahhhhhhaaaattttt". He's getting near the end of his rope now: and, to turn some recent lyrics on their head, this is turning him into an old man, and he's only just 25.

Obviously, I only have the recording to go on, but something strikes me about this electric half: there's no booing. No shouting. No heckling. It makes me start to wonder the role the British media played in stoking this particular fight; because there's remarkably little of it in Paris. Perversely, the crowd play a huge role in the first half, but seem to be behaving themselves impeccably for the second. Maybe the point is not that no one understands American music. Maybe it's limited to the British Isles.

Despite all this, they sound exhausted. One Too Many Mornings has the feeling of a man's last gasp. And not just Dylan: there's a finality to Danko's singing, and to Manuel's playing.

Applause. Nothing but applause.

As is increasingly becoming the case, Ballad Of A Thin Man is the most interesting point. It's hard not to read something into the way Dylan wails the word "home" in tonight's performance; and in exactly the same word in that pleading clip with the Italian reporter, that may well have been recorded in Paris too.

The song is staring to sound like a funeral march; and the wheels are about to come off the hearse. Little interjections reveal themselves: "You're very well-read; yes, it's well known"; "Yes, but something is happening, ain't got nothing to do with it, and you don't know what that is, do you, Mr. Jones?"; "Yes, and you really begin to wonder what's happening...why don't it include you, don't you, Mr. Jones?"

Like A Rolling Stone is now permanently dedicated to the Taj Mahal. Jones' drumming sounds tonight, more than ever, like a machine gun. "Do you wanna make a deal?" Is acquiring a melody, rather than just being spat out. On "Siamese cat" and the ensuing "no direction home" his voice sounds like it has just minutes left. The man needs to rest; not to be thrown a birthday party.

Image

The crowd sounds unanimously enthusiastic. It would be 1968 before Dylan heard that sound again.


Footage:

Acoustic and electric set footage in 66US
Tell Me, Momma, ETD (parts of it)
Tell Me, Momma, NDH (mixed with Belfast)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 04:22 GMT 

Joined: Sat May 20th, 2017, 14:32 GMT
Posts: 11
Somebody Naked wrote:
Wvalebe wrote:
A few months back, I worked on a project to compile a "complete electric set' with footage from the different European shows, using "Eat The Document", "No Direction Home" and "The 1966 Live Recordings: The Untold Story Behind The Recordings " as sources, combined with photos and film stills from that magnificent European tour. There is footage and sometimes audio mixed in from other shows too which can be confusing. A download will be in the works within the following week. It would be beyond fantastic if the film from the tour was released in the same way as The Live 1966 Recordings as there seems to be a fair amount of film from individual shows. Unfortunately much more work would have to be put into such a set, acquiring the rights etc.).

- Tell Me Mama - Paris, France
- I Don’t Believe You - Cardiff, Wales
- Baby Let Me Follow You Down - Newcastle, England
- Just Like Tom Thumbs Blues - Belfast, Ireland; Newcastle, England; Paris, France
- Leopard Skin Pill Box Hat - Dublin, Ireland
- One Too Many Mornings - Liverpool, England
- Ballad Of A Thin Man - Belfast, Ireland; Glasgow, Scotland, Edinburgh; England
- Like A Rolling Stone - Manchester, England; Newcastle, England; Edinburgh, England


Thanks for this - sounds interesting. Odd decision to avoid the Newcastle Ballad Of A Thin Man; and anything from the first London show. But I'm looking forward to seeing it.


I've considered reediting the project and have started with the last three songs. The idea this time is to use the correct audio with the correct visuals (with the exception of very brief clips, film from a concert I haven't identified or hasn't been identified here, or my decision to use the matching audio/video). In other words (for example) there are very brief clips of Edinburgh in the Like a Rolling Stone video which I have synced with the correct audio from Edinburgh. Even though it is a slower paced version of the song than Newcastle I managed to connect the audio and video of Glasgow, Edinburgh and Newcastle in a coherent form. I'll be uploading the project in parts on youtube!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 06:11 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
Wvalebe wrote:
there are very brief clips of Edinburgh in the Like a Rolling Stone video which I have synced with the correct audio from Edinburgh. Even though it is a slower paced version of the song than Newcastle I managed to connect the audio and video of Glasgow, Edinburgh and Newcastle in a coherent form. I'll be uploading the project in parts on youtube!


No mean feat! Great stuff. Can't wait to see it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 06:24 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue January 29th, 2013, 15:22 GMT
Posts: 1304
Location: The Zoom & the Roar & the Thrust
Image

They have their patissiers en Paris alright.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 07:59 GMT 
Senior Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Fri July 8th, 2005, 09:04 GMT
Posts: 11397
^ Wot, no picture of Bob and Francoise Hardy, Mr Crumble? :wink:

Somebody Naked wrote:
[bObviously, I only have the recording to go on, but something strikes me about this electric half: there's no booing. No shouting. No heckling. It makes me start to wonder the role the British media played in stoking this particular fight; because there's remarkably little of it in Paris. Perversely, the crowd play a huge role in the first half, but seem to be behaving themselves impeccably for the second. Maybe the point is not that no one understands American music. Maybe it's limited to the British Isles.




There is undoubtedly a ritualised aspect to the behaviour displayed by the audiences in the British Isles in May 1966, and I'm sure this behaviour was reported, but I think it would going too far to say that it was orchestrated by the media. After all, the heckling and disruption; booing, walkouts etc. had been taking place at Dylan concerts since July 1965 and there are reliable reports of similar behaviour from Australia. It might be that people had a better idea of how to demonstrate their disapproval by the time the tour reached Britain and the relatively small size of the countries as well as the limited numbers and homogeneity of the Dylan audience made communications among itself easier.

The audience is only one side of the equation in a public performance. Dylan and the band (who let’s remember had been present at far more of these shows than any member of the paying public) had developed their own understanding of the dynamics of their relationship with the audience over the course of the tour. I don’t think anybody would say that Dylan was unaware of the hostility of sections of the audience and didn’t set out to provoke some sort of reaction at specific points in the show. Lots of Dylan’s performances in the 60s, even before he “plugged in”, seem designed to see how far he can go in playing the audience, in confronting them and trying their sympathy to breaking point, and in some cases beyond. The 65/66 performances seem to me to be a continuation of this attitude writ larger, or louder.

All this is really a convoluted way of saying this thread has been really valuable because I think that you’ve in a sense answered your own question and probably got it about right. After the unprecedented messing about of the acoustic set in Paris Dylan wasn’t “looking for a fight” in the electric half , he and the band came out with “confidence, celebration and a certain playfulness” which set the tone for the rest of the show, hence a possibly more appreciative reaction from the French audience.

This fascinating thread is reaching its conclusion at the two London shows, they’re going to be contrasted on the basis of how Dylan and the band presented themselves. I’ll just get my observation in pre-emptively, Dylan is on stage, he is performing a stylised, heightened exaggerated version of himself to communicate with an audience of thousands in a large auditorium, he and his cohorts in the band are putting it on as much in the second London show as in the first.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 09:34 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun April 19th, 2015, 10:53 GMT
Posts: 1671
Fine analysis, thank you both! :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 17:53 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
charlesdarwin wrote:
^ Wot, no picture of Bob and Francoise Hardy, Mr Crumble? :wink:

Somebody Naked wrote:
[bObviously, I only have the recording to go on, but something strikes me about this electric half: there's no booing. No shouting. No heckling. It makes me start to wonder the role the British media played in stoking this particular fight; because there's remarkably little of it in Paris. Perversely, the crowd play a huge role in the first half, but seem to be behaving themselves impeccably for the second. Maybe the point is not that no one understands American music. Maybe it's limited to the British Isles.




There is undoubtedly a ritualised aspect to the behaviour displayed by the audiences in the British Isles in May 1966, and I'm sure this behaviour was reported, but I think it would going too far to say that it was orchestrated by the media. After all, the heckling and disruption; booing, walkouts etc. had been taking place at Dylan concerts since July 1965 and there are reliable reports of similar behaviour from Australia. It might be that people had a better idea of how to demonstrate their disapproval by the time the tour reached Britain and the relatively small size of the countries as well as the limited numbers and homogeneity of the Dylan audience made communications among itself easier.

The audience is only one side of the equation in a public performance. Dylan and the band (who let’s remember had been present at far more of these shows than any member of the paying public) had developed their own understanding of the dynamics of their relationship with the audience over the course of the tour. I don’t think anybody would say that Dylan was unaware of the hostility of sections of the audience and didn’t set out to provoke some sort of reaction at specific points in the show. Lots of Dylan’s performances in the 60s, even before he “plugged in”, seem designed to see how far he can go in playing the audience, in confronting them and trying their sympathy to breaking point, and in some cases beyond. The 65/66 performances seem to me to be a continuation of this attitude writ larger, or louder.

All this is really a convoluted way of saying this thread has been really valuable because I think that you’ve in a sense answered your own question and probably got it about right. After the unprecedented messing about of the acoustic set in Paris Dylan wasn’t “looking for a fight” in the electric half , he and the band came out with “confidence, celebration and a certain playfulness” which set the tone for the rest of the show, hence a possibly more appreciative reaction from the French audience.

This fascinating thread is reaching its conclusion at the two London shows, they’re going to be contrasted on the basis of how Dylan and the band presented themselves. I’ll just get my observation in pre-emptively, Dylan is on stage, he is performing a stylised, heightened exaggerated version of himself to communicate with an audience of thousands in a large auditorium, he and his cohorts in the band are putting it on as much in the second London show as in the first.


Thank you - you're right to point this out. Years of moaning about media manipulation have obscured my objectivity a tad, probably.

And thank you for your kind words. After this week, I won't be reviewing any more concerts here...in England...and I just wanted to saaaay...you've been very nice people...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 17:56 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
In fact, I've got a little end of tour surprise for y'all. As I'm going away on Friday evening and won't be able to post the final show review on Saturday, I think I'll bring it all one day forward: I'll post the 26th review on the 25th (tomorrow) and the 27th review on the 26th (Friday). Hope no one minds.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 18:08 GMT 
Senior Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Fri July 8th, 2005, 09:04 GMT
Posts: 11397
This thread has been an absolute pleasure. I'm looking forward to the surprise.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 18:49 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sat September 10th, 2016, 12:46 GMT
Posts: 2061
Somebody Naked wrote:
In fact, I've got a little end of tour surprise for y'all. As I'm going away on Friday evening and won't be able to post the final show review on Saturday, I think I'll bring it all one day forward: I'll post the 26th review on the 25th (tomorrow) and the 27th review on the 26th (Friday). Hope no one minds.


Good idea - that last show feels like it lasts for 2 days anyway....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 19:15 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue January 29th, 2013, 15:22 GMT
Posts: 1304
Location: The Zoom & the Roar & the Thrust
charlesdarwin wrote:
^ Wot, no picture of Bob and Francoise Hardy, Mr Crumble? :wink:


Here you go, Mr Darwin. Bob looking overjoyed at having fulfilled his ambition of meeting Francoise:

Image

Apparently, she didn't respond to him. I remember her talking about it on BBC Radio 4, a few years ago. For some reason, she thought he was taking too many drugs.

Here they are, outside L'Olympia- one assumes- with Johnny Haliday to Dylan's left. Dylan had met Haliday at 1.15am the night before, in a club off the Champs Elysee:

Image

I hope Dylan was aware of the history of L'Olympia. This is the theatre where Piaf had ruled, and where Jacques Brel performed three historic concerts in 1961, 1964 and October 1966, just a few months after Dylan. L'Olympia may have buried Dylan as far as the French press was concerned, but it's where Brel was truly made:

Image

Brel's Ne Me Quitte Pas. Incredible live performance from L'Olympia. It's subtitled too:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_bq5mStroM


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 19:21 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Wed December 16th, 2009, 12:57 GMT
Posts: 1125
Somebody Naked wrote:
In fact, I've got a little end of tour surprise for y'all. As I'm going away on Friday evening and won't be able to post the final show review on Saturday, I think I'll bring it all one day forward: I'll post the 26th review on the 25th (tomorrow) and the 27th review on the 26th (Friday). Hope no one minds.

Totally unacceptable! This lack of consistency with the dates will completely ruin the feel of this for me. How could you, SN? :evil:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 19:40 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue January 29th, 2013, 15:22 GMT
Posts: 1304
Location: The Zoom & the Roar & the Thrust
mojofilter wrote:
SDR wrote:
"play x loud" sounds a hell of a lot better than "you're a x liar" which is just a repeat of what came before with an expletive thrown in, hence the eagerness for most fans to believe the former, it is much more dramatic.


Yes, "Play x loud" is more dramatic. That's the problem. It doesn't sound like what anyone would actually say; it sounds like something from a bad biopic, a screenwriter's attempt to dramatize this crucial moment. (Biopics are full of clunkers like that--"Shall we go to the theater tonight, Mary? Some innocent amusement might take our minds off our nation's recent troubles." Or "Orange mold, Dr. Fleming? What possible good could that do anyone?") "You're a x liar" might sound lame in comparison, just repeating himself with an expletive, as you say. But that's exactly how people really talk.

I could certainly be wrong, of course. Arguments like this don't have much to do with what he (or whoever) actually said; they're kind of more about what he should have said. But when what's said really isn't clear, it's natural to hear what makes the most sense to us. I think people who hear "Play x loud" really are hearing this as a kind of script, a scene that encapsulates the mythic confrontation between Bob and the folk purists, with that line a kind of battle cry. But there's no reason to assume that Bob understood the moment in that way at all. Maybe a particular heckler just managed to get under his skin, and Bob, for once, lost his cool and screamed at him: "You're a liar! You're a x liar!"

Again, arguments like this prove nothing. Has anyone ever done a spectrographic analysis?


I revisited the "Judas" dialogue yesterday, for the first time in a long time. Here it is, audio and video, as broadcast for the first time, in NDH:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=znrlLDG0ynU#t=28.211856

The first thing to point out is that the audio is very slightly out of sync with the vision. Audio leads vision by a couple of frames, I'd say. This, of course, makes no difference to what Dylan says. That remains unchanged. But it is surprising that this, the climactic moment at the end of Scorsese's epic two-part, three and a half hour documentary should be allowed to 'air' and then go to disc out of sync. And, since vision lags, it leaves it slightly more open to interpretation as to what Dylan says. However, let's try and confine ourselves to what we can see and hear, even if there's a slight separation, then try and come to an informed, reasonable conclusion as to what Dylan says, as opposed to speculation, based on what some may feel he should have said.

What we see: well, let's start with the captioning. Scorsese, realising that the audio (and certainly the latter part) may not be clear to all, has captioned it. Notwithstanding that he has somehow allowed this critical, historic footage to be committed to tape slightly out of sync, he and his team will have sat in a high-end edit and sound suite, and heard this famous sequence under optimum conditions. They would have been able to hear, better than anyone, what is said. Accordingly, his subtitling closes with the caption 'Play it fucking loud!' He doesn't hear 'You're a fucking liar!' If he did, he would no doubt have captioned it thus, wouldn't he? Or is he just another seduced by the supposed 'myth'? I don't think he is.

What else we see is Dylan turning round and away from the audience, and therefore the direction of the "Judas" shout, towards the band. He's rocking and strumming his way towards the nod that will kickstart Like a Rolling Stone, but before that he has one more thing to say:
mojofilter wrote:
Maybe a particular heckler just managed to get under his skin, and Bob, for once, lost his cool and screamed at him: "You're a liar! You're a x liar!"


In fact, he's not lost his cool at all.Watch him. He doesn't scream it either. Watch him. He's actually half-smiling, enjoying it. He's imbuing the band with his confidence, He's egging THEM on, not the audience. It's conspiratorial, between themselves, but he's the boss, he calls the shots. He's telling the Hawks how it has to be. That's what we can see writ large on his face.

Now admittedly, if he had said "You're a fucking liar!", he wouldn't have wanted that to be picked up off his mike, and may well have turned round, as he does, but let's now study and compare the movements of his mouth, as he utters "You're a liar" and his last statement, facing the band. If that last statement had been "You're a fucking liar" then we would see similar to identical facial/ mouth movement as he utters the words "You're" and "liar". But study and compare both utterances and you'll see that they are quite different visually, particularly in the mouth movement of "liar" and the last word he utters. Compare and you'll see that there is no way that word is "liar". His lips are pushed forward and more closed, He's shaping an 'o(u)', not the opening and slight pulling back of the mouth to create an 'i'. The shape of his mouth as he faces the audience and utters the word "liar" is exactly as it should be. And it's exactly as it should be to utter the word "loud", as he faces the Hawks. Watch it, listen to it. There is no way that last word he utters is "liar". It's "loud" alright. And although the "Play it" bit is more open to debate he isn't going to be shouting "You're a fucking loud", now, is he?

I actually listened to this again, eyes closed, imagining that what he says is "You're a fucking liar" but every time it just comes out as "Play it fucking loud." I'm not doing this to keep company with Scorsese, either. but I'm afraid that the visual that emerged with NDH has visually reinforced what I've always heard, and I really don't see how it can reinforce the position of the "You're a fucking liar" believers.

And finally, I do have to say, this is a theory that really did baffle me:

mojofilter wrote:
I think there's some question whether that footage actually belongs to the audio


If the footage doesn't belong to the audio, or vice versa, seriously, what else could they belong to?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 24th, 2017, 21:10 GMT 

Joined: Sat May 20th, 2017, 14:32 GMT
Posts: 11
Aside from the other discussions here, here are the last three songs:

One Too Many Mornings (Audio/video from Liverpool, Edinburgh and Newcastle)
Ballad Of A Thin Man (Audio/video from Belfast, Glasgow, Newcastle and Edinburgh)
Like A Rolling Stone (Audio/video from Glasgow, Newcastle and Edinburgh) (I included the Manchester video as it provides a unique view and happens to be in sync, I would've used the audio from Manchester but obviously there would be a noticeable difference in mono to stereo and besides if you'd like to work on a similar project by all means... it would be interesting to see everyone's approach at making a "complete concert")

I'll upload the first four songs later in the week, no particular reason why I'm doing this out of order.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHeHTXbAOf0


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu May 25th, 2017, 05:03 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
Wvalebe wrote:
Aside from the other discussions here, here are the last three songs:

One Too Many Mornings (Audio/video from Liverpool, Edinburgh and Newcastle)
Ballad Of A Thin Man (Audio/video from Belfast, Glasgow, Newcastle and Edinburgh)
Like A Rolling Stone (Audio/video from Glasgow, Newcastle and Edinburgh) (I included the Manchester video as it provides a unique view and happens to be in sync, I would've used the audio from Manchester but obviously there would be a noticeable difference in mono to stereo and besides if you'd like to work on a similar project by all means... it would be interesting to see everyone's approach at making a "complete concert")

I'll upload the first four songs later in the week, no particular reason why I'm doing this out of order.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHeHTXbAOf0


Wonderful. Thank you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu May 25th, 2017, 05:15 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
7.30pm, Thursday 26th May, 1966. Royal Albert Hall, London, England.


Image Image

This is one of the best sounding concerts of the lot. Which is ironic, given the problems they experienced earlier in the day: it seems, from clips in 66US and ETD (“Tito…listen: we seem to have a problem” – the calmer Albert Grossman is, the more frightening he sounds) that their equipment was held up being cleared through customs after Paris. All they had was two speakers and the organ. There’s quite a bit of footage being unloaded into the Albert Hall. Who knows how it was resolved, but the concert happened. And it’s fabulous.

They really did save the best until last. This is a sublime concert; possibly the greatest gig that Dylan's released; and a rare example of his record company releasing the right recording to represent this gigantic set.

The first thing that hits you is the sound. It's professionally recorded and it sounds it. There's also that acoustic in the Albert Hall - the slight echo - which means that you can really hear the venue breathe. The guitar playing from the start has a real precision to it. As we can see from the clips of this show in No Direction Home, he's far from sober; but he appears to have hit the perfect balance in terms of what he's ingested and how it affects his performance (compare the following night).

Dylan's singing on 4th Time Around is as good as it gets: nuanced, expressive, precise.

Image

Visions Of Johanna: I'm going to go on record here and say that this is the best version of the best song on Dylan's best album. Every note is perfect: a lesson in singing, in performance, in delivery. It's been available for over thirty years, on Biograph; and, if anything, it now sounds even better. It was more than a little exciting to see that there was film of the first verse, saved for the emotional climax of No Direction Home.

I've heard Dylan sing "All your seasick sailors/They're all rowing home" more times than I care to count. The way he sings it here cuts right through me - a powerful surprise amid the familiarity. This is Dylan at the absolute pinnacle of his writing and performing achievements. Which, given what he's been through in the last month, is nothing short of incredible.

That hall echo is particularly noticeable on Desolation Row. The audience sound spellbound. There are moments when I imagine playing this to those undecided about Dylan and then giving up on them. Because, frankly, if you don't like this, what kind of a person are you?! Even after poring over this entire box set, when I'm listening to this show I could just about convince myself that you don't need to hear any more than this. It's perfect. To listen to this acoustic set is to be placed in the calming eye of the storm. It's a powerful indication of the fact that, no matter how insane things got on this tour, there were moments of pure serenity; expressed no better than here, at the near end of the tour.

"My electric guitar never goes out of tune" runs the risk of being the only perfunctory moment of the evening. He saves it with a cheeky "...does it?"

What you can really imagine here is an audience hanging on his every breath: hipper-than-thou Swinging Londoners for whom The Rolling Stones' 19th Nervous Breakdown is already old hat. Dylan is at the absolute forefront of popular culture; his position solidified by his refusal to accept it. Remember: this is the first time most of these people have heard anything like Just Like A Woman or Visions Of Johanna. Like capturing lightning in a bottle, there's a sense that Dylan is moving so fast that, by the time these songs appear on an album, he will have moved on completely.

I should be bored of listening to these songs by now. It's a measure of the strength of this performance that they sound as fresh as they do. Lines like "Take me on a trip upon your magic swirling ship" erupt out of the speakers as if for the first time, will all the urgency of a one-off news bulletin. Even the harmonica solos sound noticeably different.

The electric guitars get applause before anyone knows what they're really in for. The second the electric set kicks off, there's no shelter from the storm. This is the hurricane itself. Tell Me, Momma is as good as it's ever been. If that sounds like I'm contradicting what I said about Manchester, I apologise. This might be better. It's certainly as good.

In the five days since he last played to English fans, Dylan's come up with a new, pre-emptive retort: "This is an old song...I like all my old songs..." And then he skewers the traditionalists by telling them that The Times They Are A-Changin' influenced the next song: the sentiment, not the song. Get with it, London. You're all so hip, right? Then try and accept the concept of change.

Mickey Jones misses the opening crash of I Don't Believe You but gives the song a thudding, deep drum sound. It's triumphant, ballsy, fuck-you music; designed to shake the very foundations of this very old-fashioned hall. "Her skirt it swayed as the guitar played" is virtually screamed. And the crowd loves it: there are whistles and everything.

They continue as they mean to go on: Baby, Let Me Follow You Down is ferocious. Enormous. It's also a beautiful recording: you can hear the subtleties in Manuel's piano, Hudson's swirling keyboard, Danko's bass heartbeat; the noise on Robertson's strings. I've been to a few concerts in the Albert Hall; I've even seen Dylan there. None of them sounded remotely as apocalyptic as this.

And then the heckling starts. There are whistles, too; but the predominant sound is of disapproval. Thanks to Scorsese's subtitles, I know there's a "What happened to Woody Guthrie, Bob?" in there somewhere. But you can't hear it here. His response - jaded, slightly annoyed but more exhausted by it all, is perfect: "These are all protest songs, now, come on..."

Image

"This is...it's not British music, it's American music...y'know, come on..."

Remember: this is Kensington in 1966 - about the trendiest place in the universe at that time. Only Dylan could tell these people, shrouded in the complacency of their global fashion nucleus, that they don't understand what he's doing. As he'll tell them again in 24 hours, they've never really heard American music before. I remember thinking the same thing thirty years later, in the world of Britpop: popular culture seemed to have reset its clock to begin with The Beatles and The Kinks. Never mind what they listened to. It was astonishingly myopic. I guess that's what happens when you place yourself at a cultural epicentre.

The thunderous version of Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues that follows stands with Belfast as top of the pile. And it's both performances that are edited together in No Direction Home. "I don't have the strength to get up and take another shaaaaaaaahhaaaat" is stretched well beyond the confines of the song's structure. Again, Manuel's piano grounds it. He and Mickey Jones are the ones driving this particular train.

Image

The usual intro to Leopard Skin Pill Box Hat is cut short by a screaming fan. "Oh god..." responds a weary Dylan. Here we go again. He can't decide how aggressively to respond: at first a faux-shocked "Are you talking to me?", followed by a mild threat: "Come up here and say that." Back to the intro and into the song, as loud as they can muster.

Ditto One Too Many Mornings. Again and again, it's the drum sound that impresses: it's so powerful, and lays into the folk fans like a bulldozer. Not even Elvis, Scotty and Bill had a drummer: this is full-blown rock.

There are definitely boos and cheers after this one. Dylan mutters something between gibberish and articulate conversation (presumably with Richard Alderson) about the microphone. Is it on? "Are you sure?"

This version of Ballad Of A Thin Man takes up from where the Newcastle recording left off; Robertson christening it with the kind of blues notes that work best in the dead of night. It's the witching hour. Danko's loping, funereal bass is very audible here, rising up to meet the challenge of Jones' drums.

It's only just occurred to me: what does Richard Manuel do every night during this song? Start the party early, maybe.

Again, I love that Dylan is the one to tell Swinging London that "something is happening, and it's happening without you".

"We'd like to dedicate this song to the Taj Mahal", as is now the standard response. The most significant word in that, for me, is the first one. Dylan's not a solo act any more. They're a band of brothers: backs to the wall, guitars brandished like weapons; ready to take on the world and not bothered if they die with their boots on.

This is one of the greatest versions of this song committed to tape. The "didn't you/kiddin' you" couplet, like "next meal", is stretched as far as it'll go; over what feels like a slightly more deliberate tempo than usual, driven by Jones' machine gun drumming. There are subtleties in there, too: "do you wanna make a deal" is properly sung now, not shouted; as is "you never understood that it ain't no good". He saves the shouting for when it's effective, like in the last minute of the song. It can seem like a rant sometimes, but not here. More shading in the vomit, as it were.

The concert seems to end with an enthusiastic response. It's difficult to know how genuine, sarcastic or uncaring Dylan's closing words are.

"Thank you very much..thank you, very kind...very nice..." is what the audience gets for their efforts.

So, there you have it. Dylan and The Hawks have just played the crowning concert of the tour, and maybe of their careers. They're nearly at that point where they can rest before the tour resumes in the summer. Just one more and they're done.

"Where do we go from here?" as two thirds of these musicians were to wonder, only five years later.


Footage:

Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window, 66US (soundcheck)

Visions Of Johanna, NDH (first half - second half is Newcastle)

“these are all protest songs…”, NDH
“come up here and say that…”, 66US


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu May 25th, 2017, 06:05 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
"Quite a bit of footage being unloaded". Right. Sorry, everyone. It's getting near the end.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu May 25th, 2017, 09:50 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Wed December 16th, 2009, 12:57 GMT
Posts: 1125
That review really made my mouth watery, as I still haven´t heard this box.

I was just checking some random clips of the tour, this is possibly the funniest one to me

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jS1RRoR6Miw

I don´t know much about drugs, but I would guess for what I heard he´s on speed here.

Bob, shutting down car window: Don´t boo me anymore!! Don´t boo me! God, that booing, I can´t stand it! Haha. Oh my God
Robbie, or someone from the band: It´s hard to get in tune when they´re booing
Bob: Yeah, I can´t get in tune at all but...I can´t... I can´t... hear anything... I don´t even wanna get in tune. hehe
Robbie: When they yell in this weird nasal tone...
Bob: Oh... Jesus, you know, I don´t even understand why they... How can they buy the tickets up so fast!

:lol: :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu May 25th, 2017, 11:57 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 14th, 2015, 07:15 GMT
Posts: 441
wormington wrote:
That review really made my mouth watery, as I still haven´t heard this box.



You could buy or listen to this show, perfectly legally, on iTunes or Spotify, for example. It's simply outstanding in every regard.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 372 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group