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PostPosted: Sun November 22nd, 2009, 23:05 GMT 

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This one never really takes off for The MEZ. I listen to it though, as it's not quite a skip tune if you will. Anybody have any suggestions of some NET dates, or better yet posts? comments? MEZ


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PostPosted: Sun November 22nd, 2009, 23:38 GMT 
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I love this song... it's really lovely.


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PostPosted: Mon November 23rd, 2009, 13:01 GMT 
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Nothing wrong with Disease of Conceit. Part of its grandeur is its subtle tune working on you while the "in your face" lyrics drive home the point. The penultimate line of each, coupled with the the diagnosis of the problem, is really powerful.

Nothing about it that's sweet,
The disease of conceit.

Ain't nothing too discreet
About the disease of conceit.

Turn you into a piece of meat,
The disease of conceit.

Then they bury you from your head to your feet
From the disease of conceit.


And depressing...


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PostPosted: Mon November 23rd, 2009, 13:08 GMT 
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Try the version from The Hammersmith Odeon London February 8th 1990,the crowd roars when Bob goes to the piano which has been sitting there unplayed for most of the show.Its flipping brilliant. :D


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PostPosted: Mon November 23rd, 2009, 13:28 GMT 
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That is one of the better moments and shows of 1991. Thanks stoneyboy.


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PostPosted: Mon November 23rd, 2009, 13:38 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
That is one of the better moments and shows of 1991. Thanks stoneyboy.


Glad to be of service. :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon November 23rd, 2009, 19:09 GMT 

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Here's the youtube of that performance:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNQQUy90zPY


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PostPosted: Mon November 23rd, 2009, 19:25 GMT 
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slocastro wrote:
Here's the youtube of that performance:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNQQUy90zPY


Awesome,especially for those who may have not heard it let alone see it thanks for posting 8)


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PostPosted: Tue November 24th, 2009, 02:10 GMT 

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Here are the two performances from the Supper Club in 1993, the second being the better one IMO. Neither stacks up to the album version and its understated gospel piano vibe, but the second one especially is quite good and the sound quality is out of this world.

1993-11-16, early show:
http://www.sendspace.com/file/wfmlb5

1993-11-17, early show:
http://www.sendspace.com/file/blj0bv
(If you're only going to download one, download this one.)


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PostPosted: Tue November 24th, 2009, 07:15 GMT 

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stoneyboy wrote:
Try the version from The Hammersmith Odeon London February 8th 1990,the crowd roars when Bob goes to the piano which has been sitting there unplayed for most of the show.Its flipping brilliant.


slocastro wrote:
Here's the youtube of that performance:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNQQUy90zPY


Oh! That clip was great. A real piano too:) Thanks stoneyboy and slocastro.

I always loved this, another reason I'm so partial to Oh Mercy. Most of the opinion I've ever read refers to it as 'sophomoric.'


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PostPosted: Tue November 24th, 2009, 08:07 GMT 
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I like the lyrics BUT...to bad it wasn't on Infidels, than it would really rock !


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PostPosted: Tue November 24th, 2009, 08:11 GMT 
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I hear ya Mack...it's just kinda to slow on Oh Mercy !


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PostPosted: Tue November 24th, 2009, 08:30 GMT 
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That London performance is uncharacteristically faithful to the album version.


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PostPosted: Fri November 27th, 2009, 06:29 GMT 

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'Conceit is not necessarily a disease. It's more of a weakness. A conceited person could be set up easily and brought down accordingly. Let's face it, a conceited person has a fake sense of self-worth, an inflated opinion of himself. A person like this can be controlled and manipulated completely if you know what buttons to push. So in a sense, that's what the lyrics are talking about. The song rose up until I could read the look in its eyes. In the quiet of the evening I didn't have to hunt far for it. As always, there were a few verse left behind. 'There's a whole lot of people dreaming tonight about the disease of conceit, whole lot of people screaming tonight about the disease of conceit. I'll hump ya and I'll dump ya and I'll blow your house down. I'll slice into your cake before I leave town. Pick a number-take a seat, with the disease of conceit.'
from Chronicles

The quintessential version to my ears of this gorgeous song is from Bloomington Indiana in 1995. The last time he sang it that year and the next to last time he did it ever. God knows what that last time in Buffalo must have sounded like (no tape has yet surfaced), because this is the most emotionally powerful the song had ever been delivered IMO. The first half kills, the second half buries you...

October 26 1995
http://www.sendspace.com/file/40sxwb


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PostPosted: Fri November 27th, 2009, 17:51 GMT 

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Very underrated, here are some unpublished alternate lyrics

Give it up, you can't beat
The disease of conceit

Time to turn up the heat
For the disease of conceit

Nothing incomplete
About the disease of conceit

From Colombia to Crete
The disease of conceit

Even infects your parakeet
The disease of conceit

It'll give ya clubfeet
The disease of conceit

There's a whole lotta souls moaning tonight
About the disease of conceit
There's a whole lotta souls groaning tonight
About the disease of conceit
From comedies divine it will creep up on you
Dragging the swine and a turning the screw
Ain't nothing too neat
About the disease of conceit


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PostPosted: Fri October 14th, 2011, 01:06 GMT 
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DISEASE OF CONCEIT

Patrick Humphries

Disease Of Conceit was Dylan distraught at the lack of faith, lack of belief, lack of anything. Conceit was a disease, he suggests, which turns the best into the worst, and Dylan was still capable of translating base metal into gold.

Paul Williams

Disease Of Conceit, the eighth track on Oh Mercy, is another riveting vocal performance. In this case, there can be no question that the person singing is speaking – again, quite courageously and nakedly – from his own personal experience. In 1979, Dylan wrote, on the same topic, in the clearly autobiographical Trouble In Mind:

"Here comes Satan, prince of the power of the air. He's gonna make you a law unto yourself, build a bird's nest in your hair. He's gonna deaden your conscience till you worship the work of your own hands. You'll be serving strangers in a strange, forsaken land."

In March 1991, he told Elliott Mintz – in response to Mintz's comment that some people might come away from hearing this radio interview saying, "Gosh, I don't know why he isn't more proud of what he's done, what he's written" – "Pride? No, pride goes before a big downfall, you've heard that, we've all heard that. What is there to be proud about?"

Disease Of Conceit, like 1985's Trust Yourself, is a straightforward slice of Dylan's personal philosophy, not taken from the Bible (though it certainly resonates with Ecclesiastes' "Vanity of vanities; all is vanity") but from his own life experience. Notice, in this album that keeps returning to the theme of compassion, that the song starts, "There's a whole lot of people suffering tonight." Dylan's interest in the "disease of conceit" is not to condemn anyone, but to bemoan the pain caused by this affliction that "comes right out of nowhere," "comes right down the highway," "steps into your room." The clear implication is that although "the doctors got no cure," the singer believes awareness is the medicine that can help (as in, "ring them bells so the people will know") and that he as a singer of broadsides has a responsibility to spread the word. The song is gracefully structured with the chorus at the start of each verse, the chorus being: "There's a whole lot of people ["hearts" in verse two] gerund tonight / From the disease of conceit," repeated so that the second gerund rhymes (internal rhyme) with the first ("breaking" / "shaking" "dying" / "crying" "in trouble" / "seeing double").

As is often the case in skillful songwriting, the exceptions to this form only contribute to its elegance: "in trouble" not being a gerund, "suffering" / "struggling" not quite rhyming in the first verse, and of course the fourth of the five verses being a bridge, four lines instead of eight, with no "whole lot of" chorus at the start but instead the tagline inverted: "Conceit is a disease." This structural elegance makes it easy for the singer to tear into each line the way the disease "rips into your senses." He is fierce, eloquent, obviously sincere (you can hear it in his piano playing as well as in his voice) in his testifying, his empathy, and his regret. Songs like this are his way of ringing them bells.

Warehouse Eyes

On Disease Of Conceit Dylan comes close to preaching, which is a shame because the song does have merit both lyrically and musically. The key here is humility says Dylan while recognising the power of the disease; the use of the word "struggling" is interesting in the line "Whole lot of people struggling tonight / From the disease of conceit," as he seems to be giving it the same insidious nature as drug or alcohol dependency. This theme is continued with "Rips into your senses..." "Steps into your room..." and "Comes right out of nowhere..." until we get the assurance that the doctors are working on a cure, so far with little success. The danger of this conceit or pride or vanity (to place it as one of the seven deadly sins) he tells us is that it will give you "...delusions of grandeur / And an evil eye" but the ultimate price is that it will convince you that "You're too good to die" - this is a man speaking from experience. On balance, the album might have been better served by replacing this song with either Dignity or Series Of Dreams because of the similarity in theme between it and other tracks (notably Political World and Everything Is Broken). In fact, Lanois wanted Series Of Dreams included but was overruled.

Oliver Trager

Perhaps revisiting the terrain of Shot Of Love with its dichotomy between spirit and flesh, or Saved. With its well-intentioned if stale sermonising, Disease Of Conceit reminds us that the eealm of the senses is constantly and unsettlingly full of danger and uncertainty. And if the song comes off at times as a bit heavy-handed, with its catalogue of symptoms that can read like a school-marm’s list of dos and do nots, the narrator’s sense of empathy and implied shared experience as a sufferer of the malaise turns the song into the spoonful of sugar that helps the medicine go down. The Oxford Concise Dictionary defines conceit as “personal vanity”, and it is an anthropo-centric view of the world that Dylan attacks as the ultimate vanity here. Although his strident vocal delivery, full of stagy preachiness, has led some to suggest that Disease Of Conceit is Oh Mercy’s flimsiest, the song does establish some power as it rolls on, and this, along with its stirring, striking, and dissonant chord changes, made it a surprise performance sleeper when Dylan (playing piano) first displayed it live in 1989. It has made sporadic public appearances in the years since, with Dylan on guitar.

Clinton Heylin

Published lyric/s: Lyrics 04.

Known studio recordings: 1305 Soniat, New Orleans, 8 March 1989 – 4 takes; 28 March 1989 [overdubs]; 30 March, 3 April, 8 April 1989 [new vocal]. [OM]

First known performance: Albany, 27 October 1989.

By Dylan's own autobiographical admission, Disease Of Conceit was a song that came easily enough (“I didn't have to hunt far for it”). It was another one written in his little studio in Malibu, probably during downtime between bouts of the Never Ending Tour – though he implies otherwise. He also claims this was another one where “there were a few verses left behind”. If so, they were left behind when he travelled to New Orleans, as even the first version on tape (8 March 1989) is the exact equivalent of what he ended up releasing.

On this unadulterated version, we get to hear Dylan applying some tonal breath control to both his vocal and piano playing. The vocal he ends up using on Oh Mercy – after a series of overdubs had added the kind of guitar fills that used to get in the way (and still do) – cannot be said to add a great deal. But then, the song itself does not have a great deal to offer. If, as Dylan claims, the song aims to show how “a conceited person has a fake sense of self-worth”, it was presumably meant to juxtapose with the songs either side of it, What Good Am I? and What Was It You Wanted? The point is not well made. A couplet like “Well, they've done a lot of research on it / But what it is they're still not sure” demonstrates that first drafts should not always be left untouched.

And yet, in concert, the song could be a real highlight – perhaps because as long as Dylan believed it was making some edifyingly original point he continued to invest himself in the song. But it also gave fans an extremely rare sight of the man pounding on the (high-school) piano. From October 1989 through to the final night of the February 1990 Hammersmith residency, fans waited eagerly for the moment when he might walk over to the piano and plonk away. Even when the piano-removers moved in, and Dylan changed to doing the song on guitar, it could still be one of the finer outlets for finger-pointing in performance – as it was on 12 November 1992, at a show in Orlando, when he again seemed to be directing his venom at an uncomprehending audience.

Christopher Ricks

Sin – Pride

“Comes right out of nowhere
And you're down for the count”

The pugilistic punch in Disease of Conceit does itself come right out of nowhere, suddenly, not even “[it] comes right out of nowhere", a right hook 35 lines into the song. (Where are we now, all of a sudden? In at the killing of Davey Moore?) But no amount of ducking or weaving will stop the blow from landing. "And you're down for the count". Eight...Nine...Ten. Not just down but out.

Who killed Davey Moore? "'Not I,' says the referee", and every other participant promptly joins in the chorus of refusals to think ill of oneself.

What kills? The disease of conceit, I and I again. Is it a coincidence that the lines of each verse in Disease of Conceit count to ten?

“There's a whole lot of people suffering tonight
From the disease of conceit
Whole lot of people struggling tonight
From the disease of conceit
Come right down the highway
Straight down the line
Rips into your senses
Through your body and your mind
Nothing about it that's sweet
The disease of conceit”

The verse's closing line, the line that reaches the "it's all over now" number that is ten, finds itself pounding away at the same spot, the four words that end both the second line and the fourth line of each verse: "The disease of conceit".

But Dylan makes a final point of the final words of the song by having them take up into themselves not just those four words "The disease of conceit" but the deadly preposition "from" that so often introduces those words, right down the highway of the song: "From the disease of conceit". This five-word line tolls through the song, being the second and fourth line of all four verses. And yet in the tenth and closing line of the first three verses it does not take exactly this form, for there it does not insist, as the word "From" does, on the fatal infection, the cause.

"The disease of conceit": that is how the first three verses end. But the termination of the song is the moment that records the infection's having spread terminally from the "From ..." lines, and it presses this on us unrelentingly by pressing the "from – the cause" use of the preposition "from" against the other kind of "from", "from = the starting point". From starting point to finishing point.

“Then they bury you from your head to your feet
From the disease of conceit”

It is a graceless run of words, not a run but a ponderous plod, and you can imagine a misguided guide telling the author of it not to be so cumbrously stumbling, so lumpish on his feet. But just remember "the eagle eye with the flat feet" (Empson's phrase for George Orwell). And there is something indeflectibly honest about Dylan's flat-footedly pounding the lines here, policeman-like. Dylan as bobby. "From your head to your feet from"? But this uncouth refusal to have any mincing words or any mincing steps is the gawkily awkward right thing. Inelegant? True. Sorry about that, but such is the nature of the case.

“Nothing about it that's sweet
The disease of conceit
Ain't nothing too discreet
'Bout the disease of conceit”

Nothing about it that's graceful, the disease of conceit. Ain't nothing too fleet of foot 'bout the disease of conceit.

“Then they bury you from your head to your feet
From the disease of conceit”

From...to...From: in death, there will be no further to to look forward to.

The song starts in the tone of, and with the idiom of, a ruminative report. "There's a whole lot of people...": this has a particular movement of the head as it reflects on life or reflects life, shaking its mind sadly over something, not pointing its finger sharply at something.

“There's a whole lot of people suffering tonight
From the disease of conceit
Whole lot of people struggling tonight
From the disease of conceit”

"There's a whole lot...", when it returns, has been contracted into a pensive puckering of the mouth: "Whole lot of people ..." Not much may seem to change from the first two lines to the next two, but – all the same – things have changed: "There's a whole lot of people", pursed down to "Whole lot of people". And "suffering tonight / From the disease af conceit" is other than what off-rhymes with it: "struggling tonight / From the disease of conceit".

Off-rhyming here, just this once. The ensuing opening rhymes come straight down line: breaking tonight / shaking tonight, dying tonight / crying tonight, and in trouble tonight / seeing double tonight.

Struggling from? As a result of? Because of? But these are not the same. You know what he means, but he also means you to sense the counter-currents of the wording: you struggle with or you struggle against, you do not struggle from – though you do struggle to get away from. All sung more in sorrow than in anger.

Of the 44 lines of the song, 13 (not a lucky number) repeat “the disease of conceit": three in each verse, and the surprising one that begins the four-line bridge. Surprising, not because it comes out of nowhere but because it comes out of everywhere. After having already been warned times about "the disease of conceit", we nevertheless still need to be told that conceit is a disease.

“Conceit is a disease
But the doctors got no cure
They've done a lot of research on it
But what it is, they're still not sure”

The solemn assurance is grimly sardonic, you can be sure of that. Listen to how Dylan tilts the word "research": not "research" but "ree-search", with “respect” for the authorities even though they have not yet made the medical breakthrough.

"Right down the highway". "Straight down the line". Down, down. "And you're down for the count". And do not forget that "You may be the heavyweight champion of the world" (Gotta Serve Somebody), "But you're gonna have to serve somebody". Which is the home truth that just might be the home remedy that you need against the disease of conceit.

But wait, the differences of weight must mean that this cannot be a fair fight. I do not mean the fight between any one of us and our domesticated enemy, conceit. No, the fight between the words "disease" and "conceit". Disease is a heavyweight. Conceit is bantam weight. It is overweening (see the dictionary) but not overweight. What does the promoter think he is promoting? Where is the ref?

At which point the ref puts it to you that you are wrong about conceit. It may look slight on its feet, but it packs a punch. From the ring, you cannot run away, so you will not live to fight another day.

“Comes right out of nowhere
And you're down for the count
From the outside world
The pressure will mount
Turn you into a piece of meat
The disease of conceit”

Conceit – which likes to come on as though it is no big deal – can be death-dealing, the disease of conceit. And as soon as conceit is at work inside you, a pressure inside you, then it will join forces with the outside world. The enemy is within the gates. The outside world – say, the world outside the ring, those who are yelling for blood, and who are putting mounting pressure on those slugging it out in the ring, and who are enjoying the thought that one or both of the boxers will be turned into a piece of meat: the outside world will be only too keen to collude with your intestinal disease.

The pressure within Dylan's lines, the stress, is not on the word "world", but on "outside": not "From the outside world", but "From the outside world / The pressure will mount". The inside world already has its swollen pressure from within. The pressure mounts; you mount above yourself. Doctor Faustus was uplifted –

“Till, swollen with cunning of a self conceit
His waxen wings did mount above his reach.”
(Marlowe, Doctor Faustus, prologue)

The disease has entered. The grim casualness of "Steps into your room" is followed at once by "Eats into your soul":

“Steps into your room
Eats into your soul”

– conceit behaving as "love that's pure" does not, for love that is pure "Won't sneak up into your room" (Watered-Down Love).

The song's pressures put all this to you, aware of the resistance that its severe judgement on conceit is likely to meet, aware that conceit is good at suggesting that its stakes are not high, let alone sharp. Like vanity, conceit is shallow and petty, so can it really inflict any deep harm?

"God got the power, man has got his vanity" (Ain't No Man Righteous). Think how different "man has got his pride" would be, bringing home that pride, unlike vanity and unlike conceit, can be a good thing, self-respect for instance.

Yes, for conceit, unlike pride and arrogance, wreaks its destruction by not seeming, on the superficial face of it, to be anything like as heftily dangerous as the other members of the Family.

There are a whole lot of contrarieties in Disease Of Conceit. The jarring weight of the clangorous chords at the very beginning of the song, the sombre pace as though a judge in his grandeur were solemnly donning the black cap before passing the death sentence that is its final words:

“Give ya delusions of grandeur
And an evil eye
Give ya the idea that
You're too good to die
Then they bury you from your head to your feet
From the disease of conceit”

– eye into idea into die: these are weighty matters to ponder.

Mark 7:22: "deceit, lasciviousness, an evil eye, blasphemy, pride, foolishness: all these evil things come from within, and defile the man".

But at the same time there is this contradictory impulse, something sinisterly weightless. For the word "disease" has a kind of weight that the word "conceit" disarmingly and dangerously lacks, disarmed to the teeth. We know well enough, thank you, that conceit is not a good thing, but is it really such a destructively bad thing?

Does not it suggest the hollow, the empty, the puffed up, as against the tonnage that terror carries? Pride, we admit, carries weight, and when Dylan summons the Foot Of Pride, he brings it down with the biblical weight of the Psalmist's cry:

"Let not the foot of pride come against me, and let not the hand of the wicked remove me." (Psalms 36:11)

But conceit?

Yet the swollen distention, with its pressure, can be that of disease. The Bible understands the gravity of conceit, and Disease Of Conceit is, among other things, set upon restoring to what might seem to be a petty word a pressing sense of its ancient menace. "Wise in his own conceit": three times in one chapter of Proverbs alone.

Proverbs 26:5: "Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own conceit."

Proverbs 26:12: "Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? there is more hope of a fool than of him."

Proverbs 26:16: "The sluggard is wiser in his own conceit than seven men that can render a reason."

Romans 12:16: "Be not wise in your own conceits." Which entails being wise about the word itself and how its modern-day triviality may disguise its deadliness.

Understatement is a way of ensuring that the song, though weighty, never becomes overweight. The unexpected epithets for conceit are those that say the most, to say the least.

“Nothing about it that's sweet
The disease of conceit
Ain't nothing too discreet
'Bout the disease of conceit”

Itself very discreet, the word "discreet" there. Such words, "sweet" and "discreet", feel at once full and empty: full of an underlying understated threat, empty of any lying or huffing and puffing. And the same effect is created by the process and progress of the refrain. It is in the nature of a refrain that its reiteration makes it both more full and more empty every time it returns. A refrain needs to be both concentrated and concentrated upon.

So the deeply imaginative uses of refrain are always ones that don't just deny or deplore the fact that there is an emptying process that goes on when you say something again and again and again (your own name, for instance, getting more and more evacuated of you yourself as you go on repeating it). No, the intense resourcefulness of a refrain is shown when there is in the song or poem some appropriate engagement with this very condition: when getting at once fuller in some ways and emptier in other ways is the grim point, the poignant plight.

Which is where conceit comes in, steps into your room, eats into your soul. The fuller you are of conceit, the emptier you are of everything else, including yourself, your self.

"Disease", when the word is figurative and not literal, means "a deranged, depraved, or morbid condition (of mind or disposition); an evil affection or tendency".

1607: "Ambitious pride that been [i.e. that was] my youth's disease"; or, the disease of pride. Conceit is "an overweening opinion of oneself; over-estimation of one's own qualities, personal vanity or pride".

Granted, vanity and pride are often in the company of conceit, but they are not the same and they do not have the same heft and weft. It may be worth calling up the old sense of conceit to mean "a (morbid) affection or seizure of the body or mind", that is, a disease. (To take a conceipt, or conceit, was to sicken.)

Worth calling up, perhaps, not because Dylan is a great man for browsing in dictionaries (though he may very well be: A-Bazouki), but because anything that the English language has a way of comprehending (the relation of conceit to disease?) is likely to be something that a very resourceful adept of the English language may well be in touch with, in harmony with.

Two further pressures contribute to the saddened and saddening weight of the song. First, the disease of conceit is one that you can suffer from without really knowing it; you can suffer from it without exactly suffering.

“There's a whole lot of people suffering tonight
From the disease of conceit”

For the cunning of conceit (Marlowe's "cunning of a self conceit") is that it may find its pleasure in not giving you pain. At least, not yet a while. It is happy to bide its time, like the tumour that prefers to give no warning. "Comes out of nowhere". Some of the people glimpsed in Dylan's song clearly know that they are suffering even though they don't know what from: "There's a whole lot of hearts breaking tonight", "Whole lot of people crying tonight".

But some do not. Seeing double, they do not see the half of it. TS Eliot saw this as an understanding bitterly arrived at in Djuna Barnes's novel Nightwood:

“The miseries that people suffer through their particular abnormalities of temperament are visible on the surface: the deeper design is that of the human misery and bondage which is universal. In normal lives this misery is mostly concealed; often, what is most wretched of all, concealed from the sufferer more effectively than from the observer.” Introduction to Djuna Barnes, Nightwood (New York, 1937).

Last, and lacerating, there is the fact that "conceit" is from the Latin for conceiving, conception. So there is something peculiarly horrible about all the death that conceit deals. It ought to be a word that is on the side of life. It is not. Not least because it likes to "give ya the idea that / You're too good to die". Too bad, this thinking too well of oneself.


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PostPosted: Tue August 20th, 2013, 07:22 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
Posts: 1519
Location: City of Angels
There’s a whole lot of people suffering tonight
From the disease of conceit.
Whole lot of people struggling tonight
From the disease of conceit.
Comes right down the highway,
Straight down the line,
Rips into your senses
Through your body and your mind.
Nothing about it that’s sweet,
The disease of conceit.

There’s a whole lot of hearts breaking tonight
From the disease of conceit,
Whole lot of hearts shaking tonight
From the disease of conceit.
Steps into your room,
Eats your soul,
Over your senses
You have no control.
Ain’t nothing too discreet
About of disease of conceit.

There’s a whole lot of people dying tonight
From the disease of conceit,
Whole lot of people crying tonight
From the disease of conceit,
Comes right out of nowhere
And you’re down for the count
From the outside world,
The pressure will mount,
Turn you into a piece of meat,
The disease of conceit.

Conceit is a disease
That the doctors got no cure
They’ve done a lot of research on it
But what it is, they’re still not sure

There’s a whole lot of people in trouble tonight
From the disease of conceit,
Whole lot of people seeing double tonight
From the disease of conceit,
Give ya delusions of grandeur
And a evil eye
Give you idea that
You’re too good to die,
Then they bury you from your head to your feet
From the disease of conceit.

I hadn't seen this in a long time and I'm blown away by the power of this performance. Coming at the beginning of one
of his 'bad' years, this is the first of only two outings this song got this way....
It's a tremendous performance and song and one that I was happy to revisit and of course share with you....

http://youtu.be/GXzcigSZ7yU

And here's the recording (if anyone wants it for posterity):

London England
February 8 1990
http://www.sendspace.com/file/9toeud


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PostPosted: Tue August 20th, 2013, 10:24 GMT 
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Always a welcomed treat to hear this. Unfortunately its one of the casualties of having so many great songs and playing short setlists. I'd love to hear this make its way back into the setlist. I think Duke would have made it sound mighty fine and I have no doubt the rest of the current line up could deliver the goods. Disease Of Conceit was made for the Never Ending Tour... its a song for the ages with a message that needs to be heard... and heeded.


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PostPosted: Wed August 21st, 2013, 04:32 GMT 
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Mez wrote:
This one never really takes off for The MEZ. I listen to it though, as it's not quite a skip tune if you will. Anybody have any suggestions of some NET dates, or better yet posts? comments? MEZ


Never particularly took off for me either.


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PostPosted: Wed August 21st, 2013, 12:30 GMT 
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A very naughty lyric, one of Dylan's ultimate kiss-offs and it's pitched right at the listener's head. The lyric's pedestrian, but it reaches a level of distress well beyond something like "Things Has Changed"


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PostPosted: Wed August 21st, 2013, 12:55 GMT 
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^An interesting take. I hadn't thought of it quite that way but it possesses that social commentary edge that he has done so well... almost like it was left over from Slow Train Coming.


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PostPosted: Wed August 21st, 2013, 14:56 GMT 

Joined: Thu March 26th, 2009, 21:31 GMT
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I've always found the 10/26/95 version among the best. Everything just falls into place.


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PostPosted: Mon August 26th, 2013, 06:02 GMT 
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it's surprising to me that not more people enjoy this one. it's far superior to What Good Am I, in my opinion; if i were going to cut anything from "Oh Mercy," it'd be that one. i wish Bob would have played Disease Of Conceit instead on the Duke tour.
my favorite performance that i've heard is from the October 31, 1994 in DC. second is the '91 one.


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PostPosted: Sun February 8th, 2015, 22:23 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
Posts: 1519
Location: City of Angels
henrypussycat wrote:
A very naughty lyric, one of Dylan's ultimate kiss-offs and it's pitched right at the listener's head. The lyric's pedestrian, but it reaches a level of distress well beyond something like "Things Has Changed"


That's interesting...I always heard the song as far more compassionate than that. It's as if he's saying that conceit devastates, it 'eats away' and is very difficult to handle...more in the context that it's a disease we as humans must endure and avoid if possible, but also to be empathetic toward as well as to look within oneself before judging others....

It's a very underrated song IMO

thisisjohn wrote:
my favorite performance that i've heard is from the October 31, 1994 in DC. second is the '91 one.


Those renditions in 1994 are truly extraordinary. I love the one from Germany a few months prior...
maybe my quintessential one, I'm not sure.
Bob really connects here and takes the song to new heights....

Kiel Germany
July 25 1994
http://www.mediafire.com/listen/plu59rz ... onceit.mp3


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PostPosted: Mon February 9th, 2015, 17:18 GMT 

Joined: Wed December 7th, 2011, 17:15 GMT
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http://grooveshark.com/s/Disease+Of+Con ... eRLq?src=5 - Washington DC 1994


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