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PostPosted: Fri May 3rd, 2013, 20:20 GMT 
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You may have big big PROBLEMS at your pinnocle club now that you called Dylanologists nutters, in England no less, where you cant twirl the umbrella without stabbing one LOL

my advice, dont leave the loft and sleep with one eye open.LOL :D


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PostPosted: Fri May 3rd, 2013, 20:23 GMT 
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arthurprecarious wrote:
My mate is a real Dylanologist - writes books, been on TV, and he was the one who worked out that the 1966 Royal Albert Hall gig was actually at Manchester. So there.


Has he got any certificates? I mean does he seriously have greater taste in Dylan's music than any other fan of 10+ years?

I mean those songs are hardly going to feature in many people's top 50 Dylan songs but they're not that bad either.
He still sounds like an angry man on 'Lonesome Day Blues', the band sound great. What's not to like?


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PostPosted: Fri May 3rd, 2013, 20:24 GMT 
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That's the old spirit.


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PostPosted: Fri May 3rd, 2013, 20:25 GMT 
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no he aint got no certificate, they email the BBC with the headline TOP DYLANOLOGIST at your service but without any actual refrences. his buddy here, Fabio says he most likeley a nutter. :D


most foks outside of the USA got no sense for the blues....... have you had the misfortune of listening to some of that Eurovision Musical Song Contest??????

Bob got the blues in his blood, if you dont like its because you havent educated yourself properly. :D


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PostPosted: Fri May 3rd, 2013, 21:17 GMT 
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Every so-called [by the media] Dylanologist is a nutter LOL
I've met enough of them. They know it's all bollocks. LOL

However, the few who consider their song analysis and opinion to be fact and beyond question, are proper nutters. Everyone knows that. LOL


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PostPosted: Fri May 3rd, 2013, 21:49 GMT 
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Right. I dont think there exists a single Dylanologist that considers their song analysis and opinion not to be fact. :D
i suppose that settles it, LOL :D youve convinced me , nutters it is. :D


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PostPosted: Sat May 4th, 2013, 03:55 GMT 
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So, if I understand how this has played out, Lambchop was a "TOP" "dylanologist" and OK with everyone, but all dylanologists think their song analyses are the only correct ones and are, thus, all "nutters"? So does that mean that being a "nutter" is not a problem? Or that only the "TOP" "nutter" is OK with everyone? Or that only Lampchop has the quality of being a "dylanologist" without also having the quality of being a "nutter"?

The implication of the original claims (in the first sentence above) is that anyone who is a "dylanologist" is also someone who has a strong (even absolute position) on Dylan's lyrics. Is that true? Is a "dylanologist" necessarily a person who makes absolute claims about Dylan's lyrics? Is having a strong/absolute claim about Dylan lyrics a necessary and sufficient condition for being a "dylanologist"? Is it possible to be a dylan fan, attend to his lyrics, have an opinion or interpretation or theory about those lyrics, not make a truth claim about one's interpretations, et al., and, so, not be a "nutter"? Can such a person also be a "dylanologist" and also not a "nutter"?

And is "musicology" necessarily distinct from "dylanology"? Aren't Dylan superfans who are into dylan "musicology" thereby dylano-musico-ologists? Or, again, are you only a "dylanologist" if you attend to the lyrics? Is it possible for someone to make absolute claims about Dylan's music, absolute claims about the "nutter"-quality of anyone who attends to the lyrics, and not be a "musicologist-nutter"?


Just wondering. Thanks.


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PostPosted: Sat May 4th, 2013, 09:34 GMT 
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WTF? LOL :D :D LOL :D etc. etc.


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PostPosted: Sat May 4th, 2013, 13:45 GMT 
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LOL first the bagel then the cream cheese LOOLLLL :lol:
some things never change.LOL :D


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PostPosted: Sat May 4th, 2013, 16:04 GMT 

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Goombay - for a man with no brain you make a lot of assumptions. My friend, who wishes to remain anonymous, was first invited by the BBC to comment on Dylan's NET back in the 1990's and has been consulted many times since. He has collaborated with the BBC on a number of productions since. Some involve Bob some don't.

You display your ignorance when taking about "Brits" (as you Yanks insist on calling us) when you bring an irrelevant reference to an umbrella into your comments. Why don't you add in some similar stupid comments about "Top Hats", fog and the Queen.


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PostPosted: Sat May 4th, 2013, 16:21 GMT 
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the_revelator wrote:
He's not especially talented when it comes to blues.


Yeah, and Bach could never get the hang of church music. And why on earth did he bother with that St John's Passion? He'd already done the Gospel according to Matthew and it's the same story, isn't it?

Incidentally, instead of the customary I-IV-V blues form, Early Roman Kings has a I-I-IV sequence, which has not been used in any of the Mannish Boy style stop-time blues that I'm aware of. Has anyone come across this before?


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PostPosted: Sat May 4th, 2013, 17:17 GMT 
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no aint ever seen that chord sequance before in that setting correct you are. thank you for setting the record straight with your unimpeachable facts. :D
this thread has exposed the lack of musicology in this forum, that Bob has no talent for the blues. i think a blues consulting concern should be set up here with the Queens grace and permission, of course LOL

excuse me, the guava jelly just go to the table to go with the bagel and cream cheese. bloody fine guava jelly LOL

soon as i finish chompin here im gonna contact the BBC anonymously and ask if they need some help with the blues section of dylanology. 100000 dollars consultin fee i charge LOL :D

and when i get to the BBC i need a red elvis velvet carpet rolled up the street so i can walk softly on it, and curtsy to the folks as they open the door for me. i also need cheesburgers with real meat and some jack daniels to greet me, they gotta showm me respect, no foolin around when im around im not one of them nutters they previoulsy, according to our friend Fabio, did business with. :shock:


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PostPosted: Sat May 4th, 2013, 19:49 GMT 
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Voice With Restraint wrote:
the_revelator wrote:
He's not especially talented when it comes to blues.


Yeah, and Bach could never get the hang of church music. And why on earth did he bother with that St John's Passion? He'd already done the Gospel according to Matthew and it's the same story, isn't it?

Incidentally, instead of the customary I-IV-V blues form, Early Roman Kings has a I-I-IV sequence, which has not been used in any of the Mannish Boy style stop-time blues that I'm aware of. Has anyone come across this before?


That's a permeating analogy, Voice with Restraint. Musicology.


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PostPosted: Sat May 4th, 2013, 21:07 GMT 

Joined: Mon May 4th, 2009, 04:15 GMT
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Best thread I've read on here for years. Just like the old days when us Brits got slagged off by all & sundry for daring to aspire to a bottom place finish on dylanpool. Must point out, though, Mr Precarious, that Bob's Rollin & Tumblin is 10 verses of poetic brilliance set to an ancient R&B riff that predates anyone who's ever set music to vinyl, as opposed to everyone else's 3 verses of commonplace banalities set to an ancient R&B riff that predates blah blah blah

newpony


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PostPosted: Sun May 5th, 2013, 04:32 GMT 
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goombay wrote:
LOL first the bagel then the cream cheese LOOLLLL :lol:
some things never change.LOL :D


Wait a minute. What does that mean? Is that about ethnicity or something?

How is that relevant to the issues at hand?


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PostPosted: Sun May 5th, 2013, 08:04 GMT 
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Voice With Restraint wrote:
the_revelator wrote:
He's not especially talented when it comes to blues.


Yeah, and Bach could never get the hang of church music. And why on earth did he bother with that St John's Passion? He'd already done the Gospel according to Matthew and it's the same story, isn't it?

Incidentally, instead of the customary I-IV-V blues form, Early Roman Kings has a I-I-IV sequence, which has not been used in any of the Mannish Boy style stop-time blues that I'm aware of. Has anyone come across this before?


Love the sarcasm apropos of nothing. "God, he never got the hang of the whole 'creating the world' thing." Heavy!


Check out any of the greatest old bluesmen. Hell, check out the Yardbirds. Dylan is great at many things. But he is never going to be good at the 'old bluesman' mantle he's trying to assume. He's one of the greatest songwriters of modern times. But none of his truly great songs are the 'throwaway' blues songs. They're the laziest and most pedestrian of his work. 99% are not worthy of him.


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PostPosted: Sun May 5th, 2013, 13:41 GMT 
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gedkeilty wrote:
Best thread I've read on here for years. Just like the old days when us Brits got slagged off by all & sundry for daring to aspire to a bottom place finish on dylanpool. Must point out, though, Mr Precarious, that Bob's Rollin & Tumblin is 10 verses of poetic brilliance set to an ancient R&B riff that predates anyone who's ever set music to vinyl, as opposed to everyone else's 3 verses of commonplace banalities set to an ancient R&B riff that predates blah blah blah

newpony



thank you for your commentary and welcome to our board where folks from all over the world are welcome to post. they are hollerin for me to come outside, im not sure if they wanna kill me or kiss me but in either event, just in case, im gonna take a pass. neighborhood kids. anyways, im munchin on my daily bagel with cream cheese, jelly on the way.LOLLLLLL everyday i got the guava jelly blues LOLLL one of my favs bob marley numbers the guava jelly LOL
commendable excercise in musickoloy your post. it shows that all is not foggy in albion, land of king arthur and the great sir lancelot. yes rollin and tumblin is a major work and true example of solid gold blues power, im listening to it now. only a blues master like bob could have made such a formidable track.
a powerful dolop of blues grace. moster track all the way around.

thank you for your brilliant contribution. :D


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PostPosted: Sun May 5th, 2013, 14:07 GMT 
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The blues has informed all the music Dylan's made in his whole life, and he learned the form inside and out as a young man, not in terms of technical mastery but something else that is harder to put a finger on. It's hard to say he's a great bluesman or that his songs are great blues songs because that's all done - finished. Most of it was done before he hit NYC as a little boy. It is easy to say, however, that he carries something of the real blues with him. He once said something about how he was different from Springsteen because he had "met the traditional people", people like Dock Boggs or Roscoe Holcomb or even John Lee Hooker, and something rubbed off. That's his own ego talking, of course, but it's also true that what you get from records or even a live performance is not the same as what can imparted sitting around a kitchen drinking whiskey. Obviously that doesn't mean just anybody can pick up those intangible things, but put a genius in the right place at the right time and you can have something as strange as a Verlane-reading, middle class Jewish bluesman spring up and take blues forms and motifs to places they've never been...and back again.

What you have right here:

Tweedles
Lonesome Day Blues
Cry A While
Rollin' and Tumblin'
Someday Baby (MT take)
Levee (live version)
My Wife's Hometown
Shake Shake Mama
Early Roman Kings
Forgetful Heart
Million Miles
High Water
Po' Boy
Marchin to the City
Cold Irons Bound
Dirt Road Blues
Highlands

Is a very fine three-record set of blues, at risk of being hyperbolic I might say it would rival most anything going down (blues-wise) this century. People like Corey Harris or Gabe Carter can really play and sing the hell out of traditional styles, but I don't know if either could produce work like this. The fact that it isn't the best thing Dylan did in his life or (arguably) even in the last two decades just makes it more impressive, imo.


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PostPosted: Sun May 5th, 2013, 17:15 GMT 

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smoke wrote:
The blues has informed all the music Dylan's made in his whole life, and he learned the form inside and out as a young man, not in terms of technical mastery but something else that is harder to put a finger on. It's hard to say he's a great bluesman or that his songs are great blues songs because that's all done - finished. Most of it was done before he hit NYC as a little boy. It is easy to say, however, that he carries something of the real blues with him. He once said something about how he was different from Springsteen because he had "met the traditional people", people like Dock Boggs or Roscoe Holcomb or even John Lee Hooker, and something rubbed off. That's his own ego talking, of course, but it's also true that what you get from records or even a live performance is not the same as what can imparted sitting around a kitchen drinking whiskey. Obviously that doesn't mean just anybody can pick up those intangible things, but put a genius in the right place at the right time and you can have something as strange as a Verlane-reading, middle class Jewish bluesman spring up and take blues forms and motifs to places they've never been...and back again.

What you have right here:

Tweedles
Lonesome Day Blues
Cry A While
Rollin' and Tumblin'
Someday Baby (MT take)
Levee (live version)
My Wife's Hometown
Shake Shake Mama
Early Roman Kings
Forgetful Heart
Million Miles
High Water
Po' Boy
Marchin to the City
Cold Irons Bound
Dirt Road Blues
Highlands

Is a very fine three-record set of blues, at risk of being hyperbolic I might say it would rival most anything going down (blues-wise) this century. People like Corey Harris or Gabe Carter can really play and sing the hell out of traditional styles, but I don't know if either could produce work like this. The fact that it isn't the best thing Dylan did in his life or (arguably) even in the last two decades just makes it more impressive, imo.


Smoke, you're smokin'! :D Couldn't agree more.


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PostPosted: Mon May 6th, 2013, 16:18 GMT 
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the_revelator wrote:
Check out any of the greatest old bluesmen. Hell, check out the Yardbirds. Dylan is great at many things. But he is never going to be good at the 'old bluesman' mantle he's trying to assume.


The Yardbirds? What was it Sonny Boy Williamson (Rice Miller) said about them? "Those English boys, they want to play the blues so bad. And you know what... they play 'em so bad." Now that was just an opinion of Sonny Boy's, one I happen to agree with (Peter Green being an honourable exception), but I think you and I have different ideas of what the blues is, and I am sure it's a gap that will never be bridged.

"Well, the night's filled with shadows, the years are filled with early doom
The night is filled with shadows, the years are filled with early doom
I've been conjuring up all these long dead souls from their crumbling tombs"

Keep on conjuring, Bob.


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PostPosted: Thu July 4th, 2013, 00:42 GMT 

Joined: Sun March 3rd, 2013, 21:57 GMT
Posts: 83
Here's a compilation i put together-

21st Century Tired and Lazy Blues
1. Thunder on the Mountain
2. Early Roman Kings
3. Summer Days
4. Duquense Whistle
5. Rollin' and Tumblin'
6. Beyond Here Lies Nothin'
7. Someday Baby
8. Cry A While
9. Shake Shake Mama
10. Lonesome Day Blues


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