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What about Biograph ?
https://www.expectingrain.com/discussions/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=69962
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Author:  Troubadour64 [ Wed May 16th, 2012, 17:22 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Trev wrote:
supermabel1 wrote:
Erm, not by a million miles was it the first, troub! :shock: Even ignoring hundreds of classical and opera box sets, I have a number of box sets which were issued many years before Biograph: The Complete Buddy Holly issued in 1979 and the Chess blues box set Genesis issued in 1972 come immediately to mind... but Biograph is, as others rightly say, a great collection, imaginatively sequenced and brilliantly annotated. Bravo, Columbia or Sony or whoever you were in '85! :D


It was one of the first major CD box sets I think, and may well have helped establish a market for them.


that's the stat i was looking for ... and yes i had a feeling as I phrased it there was something that seemed very wrong about it... i know i read it somewhere....

Author:  supermabel1 [ Wed May 16th, 2012, 17:40 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Ah well, now yer talkin' CDs, it makes sense. Yep, Trev is surely right. 8) :D

Author:  michael curtius [ Fri September 13th, 2013, 19:32 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

^^ today I received Biograph-box-set , vinyls. Good sound !
Some songs have some relationship to BS 10 !
Would it make sense to call Biograph - the BS Number 0 ?
It is careful edited -with two booklets .

Author:  WrittenInMySoul [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 07:05 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Yes, I think Biograph could be called BS Zero. It was a great success critically and commercially ( it went platinum in the US). So it showed the peolple in charge
a) that there is a market for CD box sets
b) how to use all the Dylan stuff from the archives and how to present it to the public

Author:  Untrodden Path [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 11:53 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

I remember the excitement when it was released. It's success opened up a Pandora's box that we hoped wouldn't be closed. Certainly everyone knew the vaults contained a lot of music but the quality of the music was anyone's guess because the assumption was that the best recordings were the ones officially released on the albums. In some cases, Biograph was a revelation that this may not have always been the case. If Biograph had failed miserably it may have been decades before anyone would have risked the Official Bootleg Series... if ever. It's success almost certainly made everyone wonder what else could/would/should be released.

Author:  henrypussycat [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 14:01 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

It was the first rock'n'roll box set. I never thought it flowed all that well but I appreciated some of the previously unreleased songs. When I got I already had most of the albums and those were listenable enough that I seldom played sides of Biograph.

Author:  Trev [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 16:27 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

henrypussycat wrote:
It was the first rock'n'roll box set. I never thought it flowed all that well but I appreciated some of the previously unreleased songs. When I got I already had most of the albums and those were listenable enough that I seldom played sides of Biograph.


I think the first rock 'n' roll box set was the eight lp Elvis Aaron Presley (don't know who the artist was), which was released in 1980 and sold a million, but there may have been forerunners to that.

Author:  man in the moon [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 17:30 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Got it soon after the Bootleg Series 1 - 3. Remember lapping up the liner notes and pictures. Bob came across as grumpy as fu*k in the interview but the pics were great. Made me listen to some individual tracks like Percy's song that had been drowned out before. Good for its time but we could all have made a better Biograph given the material?

Author:  John B. Stetson [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 20:50 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

It's what got me into Dylan in the mid-eighties. I thought Bob Dylan was a Contemporary Christian artist, and I knew of him though Contemporary Christian radio and I Believe in You and Gotta Serve Somebody and my copies of Slow Train and Saved I got from the Christian book store. When I got Biograph, my first thought was, ah, nice, Bob Dylan covered the Byrds' Mr. Tambourine Man. Not as sweet, but...interesting. And--Oh, I sang that folk song Blowin' in the Wind too, in my 5th grade choir.

As I listened further, I fell in love with Tangled Up in Blue and Visions of Johanna. I bought Blood on the Tracks. And got hooked.

Author:  kuddukan [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 22:35 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Biograph I got from a local library. Wore it out listening over and over again. Part of what got me hooked on Dylan.

Author:  Mickvet [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 22:41 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

John B. Stetson wrote:
It's what got me into Dylan in the mid-eighties. I thought Bob Dylan was a Contemporary Christian artist, and I knew of him though Contemporary Christian radio and I Believe in You and Gotta Serve Somebody and my copies of Slow Train and Saved I got from the Christian book store. When I got Biograph, my first thought was, ah, nice, Bob Dylan covered the Byrds' Mr. Tambourine Man. Not as sweet, but...interesting. And--Oh, I sang that folk song Blowin' in the Wind too, in my 5th grade choir.

As I listened further, I fell in love with Tangled Up in Blue and Visions of Johanna. I bought Blood on the Tracks. And got hooked.


Great story. Shows Dylan can be approached from any number of angles. With myself, it was different. I had, in my youthful ignorance believed the mainstream media slant that Dylan's Gospel period was a talentless aberration, hadn't bought Saved or Shot of Love (even though I did have Slow Train coming, and you know, it wasn't that bad, but I was impressionable), then my wife got me Biograph for Christmas and I heard Solid Rock, and I read that Cameron Crowe interview... On my part, there was a MAJOR reassessment of everything Dylanesque. Haven't looked back.

Author:  michael curtius [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 22:54 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

John B. Stetson wrote:
It's what got me into Dylan in the mid-eighties. I thought Bob Dylan was a Contemporary Christian artist, and I knew of him though Contemporary Christian radio and I Believe in You and Gotta Serve Somebody and my copies of Slow Train and Saved I got from the Christian book store. When I got Biograph, my first thought was, ah, nice, Bob Dylan covered the Byrds' Mr. Tambourine Man. Not as sweet, but...interesting. And--Oh, I sang that folk song Blowin' in the Wind too, in my 5th grade choir.

As I listened further, I fell in love with Tangled Up in Blue and Visions of Johanna. I bought Blood on the Tracks. And got hooked.


Appreciate your story ! I come to Bobs music in the early seventies. Then in the eighties - I experienced a sort of crisis by myself with the new albums. But crisis is not only negative . You feel it negative, but on a higher level it is necesssary . The forms of crisis are also very different, it´s difficult to find way out - also time itself is working on it. And so the next vinyls with Bob I´ve bought in the eighties were the Travelling Wilbury Albums.

Author:  Gazza63 [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 23:50 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Troubadour64 wrote:
the best dylan multi-disc collection is Masterpieces or Bootleg Series 1-3. BUT - Biograph, i believe, was the FIRST boxed set ever!



Far from it. Can think of four Elvis boxed sets that preceded it.

Worldwide 50 Gold Awards Hits (1970) and it's follow up Vol2. 'The Other Sides' that came out the following year. RCA then released an 8-LP set called 'Elvis Aaron Presley' in 1980 and another one called 'A Golden Celebration' in 1984, both of which were all (or almost all) previously unreleased material.

Author:  Gazza63 [ Sat September 14th, 2013, 23:55 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Untrodden Path wrote:
I remember the excitement when it was released. It's success opened up a Pandora's box that we hoped wouldn't be closed. Certainly everyone knew the vaults contained a lot of music but the quality of the music was anyone's guess because the assumption was that the best recordings were the ones officially released on the albums. In some cases, Biograph was a revelation that this may not have always been the case. If Biograph had failed miserably it may have been decades before anyone would have risked the Official Bootleg Series... if ever. It's success almost certainly made everyone wonder what else could/would/should be released.



There was a 90 minute tape doing the rounds for two years before its release which consisted of about 18 unreleased songs which had been shortlisted for inclusion on the "proposed 5-LP set". It pretty much matched what they DID include in the end too - although a couple of the songs on the bootleg tape had little extras like a few seconds of pre-song dialogue here and there as I remember. It really was a revelation to hear stuff like Up to Me, Caribbean Wind and Abandoned Love for the first time. I recall getting it around the time 'Infidels' came out.

Author:  Still Go Barefoot [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 00:16 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Untrodden Path wrote:
It's success almost certainly made everyone wonder what else could/would/should be released.


Yes. The smell of money is strong.

Author:  Trev [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 08:12 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Cool name for a boxset.

Author:  panther [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 09:54 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Biograph was nearly perfect, wasn't it? I personally could do without a few selections (I don't like any live versions of "All Along the Watchtower" or "Isis", and I think "Gotta Serve Somebody" is an atrocious song, biographically important though it may be), but overall this was an opportunity well realized. And yes, I think it did introduce several younger listeners to Dylan.

(More to the point, it made a pile of money for Columbia.)

Author:  michael curtius [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 11:38 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

^^great booklet text

http://imageshack.us/a/img443/1308/jw65.jpg

Author:  Alouette [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 11:45 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

I really do enjoy biograph.
My problem is that it was given to me on cassettes !
And only one still plays :(
am unable to play cassette w/ abandoned love & carribean wind.
that stinks

Author:  michael curtius [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 12:17 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

^^ booklet , another part

http://imageshack.us/a/img59/2510/xmkq.jpg

Author:  smiley [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 12:22 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

If memory serves me well, BIOGRAPH was the first rock boxed set to be released on CD.

Author:  thickboy [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 16:09 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

smiley wrote:
If memory serves me well, BIOGRAPH was the first rock boxed set to be released on CD.


Further proof that Dylan is a ground-breaking, innovative and masterful legend... there is no end to this guys glorious greatness.

Author:  Rainwater [ Sun September 15th, 2013, 18:50 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

I've never been a huge fan of Biograph, but it was one of the first ways I got into Dylan. I remember enjoying a few songs ("Lay Down Your Weary Tune", "Percy's Song" and "I'll Keep It with Mine") a lot more than the rest and still do. The haphazard track list got on my nerves. Of course, that was before I started making my own compilation cassettes, CD's and, more recently, playlists. The title implies that it's a career-spanning retrospective, and I guess it is... sort of. The vinyl release shows that it was likely meant to be heard as thematic sides, but it's nothing short of a jumbled mess on CD. A chronological track list would have made more sense. Whereas Biograph's track list is a mishmash of Dylan's career from 1962 to 1981, a chronological order would allow you to hear how he had changed from 1962 to 1981.

At first glance, Biograph appears to be centered around greatest hits with outtakes and live performances thrown in. In fact, Greatest Hits is included in its entirety, with the exception of "Rain Day Women #12 & 35", and five songs from Greatest Hits II are included (It would be seven, but "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" and "All Along the Watchtower" are live versions so they don't count) which brings the total to 14 greatest hits out of 30 previously released album tracks (NOTE: "Positively 4th Street" was officially released on Greatest Hits, but I always label it as an outtake. It was recorded during the Highway 61 Revisited sessions, unlike "I Shall Be Released" being recorded for Greatest Hits II). The other 16 album tracks are:

Baby, Let Me Follow You Down (Bob Dylan)
Masters of War (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan)
The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll (The Times They are A-Changin')
To Ramona (Another Side of Bob Dylan)
Tombstone Blues (Highway 61 Revisited)
Million Dollar Bash (The Basement Tapes)
Dear Landlord (John Wesley Harding)
Time Passes Slowly (New Morning)
Knockin' on Heaven's Door (Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid)
On a Night Like This (Planet Waves)
You Angel You (Planet Waves)
Tangled Up in Blue (Blood on the Tracks)
Señor (Tales of Yankee Power) (Street-Legal)
Gotta Serve Somebody (Slow Train Coming)
I Believe in You (Slow Train Coming)
Solid Rock (Saved)
Every Grain of Sand (Shot of Love)

Keep in mind that the greatest hits are already there for the casuals, and the goodies (outtakes, live tracks, etc.) are there for the true followers. So then what is the purpose of the stray album tracks? The selections aren't awful, but how is "Masters of War" more worthy than "A Hard Rain's..." or "Don't Think Twice"? "Tombstone Blues" over "It Takes a Lot to Laugh", "Ballad of a Thin Man" and "Highway 61"? "Dear Landlord" over "As I Went Out One Morning", "I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine" and "Frankie Lee and Judas Priest"? You get the idea. They seem to be there for the casuals to dig deeper, but the selections are spotty. So what's the point?

Another problem is that the collection downplays one of his most important periods (1975-1976). Blood on the Tracks and Desire, along with the Rolling Thunder Revue tour, rejuvenated his career. What represents that period? Blood on the Tracks: "Up to Me" (outtake), an alternate version of "You're a Big Girl Now" from the New York sessions and "Tangled Up in Blue". Desire: "Abandoned Love" (outtake), as well as live performances of "Romance in Durango" and "Isis" from a 1975 concert in Montreal. There is no "Shelter from the Storm", "Idiot Wind", "Hurricane" or "One More Cup of Coffee". The album version of "Isis", at least, would have been more fitting than a randomly drawn live version.

Something else that bothers me is the inclusion of alternate and/or live versions filling in for superior studio versions. Why is the live version of "All Along the Watchtower" from '74 included while Jimi Hendrix's masterful recording is highly praised by Dylan in the booklet? Surely the goal wasn't to make Dylan's sound incredibly inferior. Perhaps that was an oversight, very much like the exclusion of one of Dylan's best studio recordings, "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue", in favor of a worn and ragged performance from an acoustic set during a '66 electric tour. Those two songs are top tier, yet they're reduced to underwhelming wastes of space.

Ugh.

At least the booklet is worth keeping.

At this point, it's the only reason for me.

Here's my Biograph chronology for the lazy and curious:

Code:
1962 - Baby, Let Me Follow You Down (Bob Dylan)
       Baby, I'm in the Mood for You (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan; outtake)
       Mixed-Up Confusion (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan; outtake)
1963 - Blowin' in the Wind (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan)
       Masters of War (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan)
       Percy's Song (The Times They are A-Changin'; outtake)
       Lay Down Your Weary Tune (The Times They are A-Changin'; outtake)
1964 - The Times They are A-Changin' (The Times They are A-Changin')
       The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll (The Times They are A-Changin')
       To Ramona (Another Side of Bob Dylan)
       It Ain't Me, Babe (Another Side of Bob Dylan)
1965 - I'll Keep It with Mine (Bringing It All Back Home; outtake)
       Subterranean Homesick Blues (Bringing It All Back Home)
       Mr. Tambourine Man (Bringing It All Back Home)
       Positively 4th Street (Highway 61 Revisited; outtake)
       Like a Rolling Stone (Highway 61 Revisited)
       Tombstone Blues (Highway 61 Revisited)
       Jet Pilot (Blonde on Blonde; outtake)
       Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? (Blonde on Blonde; outtake)
       I Wanna Be Your Lover (Blonde on Blonde; outtake)
       I Want You (Blonde on Blonde)
       Just Like a Woman (Blonde on Blonde)
1966 - I Don't Believe You (Live; May 6, 1966, Belfast, Northern Ireland)
       It's All Over Now, Baby Blue (Live; May 17, 1966, Manchester, England)
       Visions of Johanna (Live; May 26, 1966, London, England)
1967 - Quinn the Eskimo (The Mighty Quinn) (The Basement Tapes)
       Million Dollar Bash (The Basement Tapes)
       Dear Landlord (John Wesley Harding)
       I'll Be Your Baby Tonight (John Wesley Harding)
1969 - Lay Lady Lay (Nashville Skyline)
1970 - If Not for You (New Morning)
       Time Passes Slowly (New Morning)
1971 - I Shall Be Released (Greatest Hits Vol. II)
1973 - Knockin' on Heaven's Door (Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid)
       Forever Young (demo)
1974 - On a Night Like This (Planet Waves)
       You Angel You (Planet Waves)
       All Along the Watchtower (Live; Feb. 14, 1974, Los Angeles, CA (afternoon))
       Most Likely You Go Your Way (Live; Feb 14, 1974, Lose Angeles, CA (evening))
       Up to Me (Blood on the Tracks; outtake)
       You're a Big Girl Now (Blood on the Tracks; New York sessions)
       Tangled Up in Blue (Blood on the Tracks)
1975 - Abandoned Love (Desire; outtake)
       Romance in Durango (Live; Dec. 4, 1975, Montreal, Quebec, Canada)
       Isis (Live; Dec. 4, 1975 - Montreal, Quebec, Canada)
1978 - Señor (Tales of Yankee Power) (Street-Legal)
1979 - Gotta Serve Somebody (Slow Train Coming)
       I Believe in You (Slow Train Coming)
1980 - Solid Rock (Saved)
1981 - Carribean Wind (Shot of Love; outtake)
       The Groom's Still Waiting at the Altar (Shot of Love; outtake)
       Every Grain of Sand (Shot of Love)
       Heart of Mine (Live; Nov. 10, 1981, New Orleans, LA)


:)

Author:  Tedham [ Mon September 16th, 2013, 07:08 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

Rainwater wrote:
I've never been a huge fan of Biograph, but it was one of the first ways I got into Dylan. I remember enjoying a few songs ("Lay Down Your Weary Tune", "Percy's Song" and "I'll Keep It with Mine") a lot more than the rest and still do. The haphazard track list got on my nerves. Of course, that was before I started making my own compilation cassettes, CD's and, more recently, playlists. The title implies that it's a career-spanning retrospective, and I guess it is... sort of. The vinyl release shows that it was likely meant to be heard as thematic sides, but it's nothing short of a jumbled mess on CD. A chronological track list would have made more sense. Whereas Biograph's track list is a mishmash of Dylan's career from 1962 to 1981, a chronological order would allow you to hear how he had changed from 1962 to 1981.

At first glance, Biograph appears to be centered around greatest hits with outtakes and live performances thrown in. In fact, Greatest Hits is included in its entirety, with the exception of "Rain Day Women #12 & 35", and five songs from Greatest Hits II are included (It would be seven, but "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" and "All Along the Watchtower" are live versions so they don't count) which brings the total to 14 greatest hits out of 30 previously released album tracks (NOTE: "Positively 4th Street" was officially released on Greatest Hits, but I always label it as an outtake. It was recorded during the Highway 61 Revisited sessions, unlike "I Shall Be Released" being recorded for Greatest Hits II). The other 16 album tracks are:

Baby, Let Me Follow You Down (Bob Dylan)
Masters of War (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan)
The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll (The Times They are A-Changin')
To Ramona (Another Side of Bob Dylan)
Tombstone Blues (Highway 61 Revisited)
Million Dollar Bash (The Basement Tapes)
Dear Landlord (John Wesley Harding)
Time Passes Slowly (New Morning)
Knockin' on Heaven's Door (Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid)
On a Night Like This (Planet Waves)
You Angel You (Planet Waves)
Tangled Up in Blue (Blood on the Tracks)
Señor (Tales of Yankee Power) (Street-Legal)
Gotta Serve Somebody (Slow Train Coming)
I Believe in You (Slow Train Coming)
Solid Rock (Saved)
Every Grain of Sand (Shot of Love)

Keep in mind that the greatest hits are already there for the casuals, and the goodies (outtakes, live tracks, etc.) are there for the true followers. So then what is the purpose of the stray album tracks? The selections aren't awful, but how is "Masters of War" more worthy than "A Hard Rain's..." or "Don't Think Twice"? "Tombstone Blues" over "It Takes a Lot to Laugh", "Ballad of a Thin Man" and "Highway 61"? "Dear Landlord" over "As I Went Out One Morning", "I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine" and "Frankie Lee and Judas Priest"? You get the idea. They seem to be there for the casuals to dig deeper, but the selections are spotty. So what's the point?

Another problem is that the collection downplays one of his most important periods (1975-1976). Blood on the Tracks and Desire, along with the Rolling Thunder Revue tour, rejuvenated his career. What represents that period? Blood on the Tracks: "Up to Me" (outtake), an alternate version of "You're a Big Girl Now" from the New York sessions and "Tangled Up in Blue". Desire: "Abandoned Love" (outtake), as well as live performances of "Romance in Durango" and "Isis" from a 1975 concert in Montreal. There is no "Shelter from the Storm", "Idiot Wind", "Hurricane" or "One More Cup of Coffee". The album version of "Isis", at least, would have been more fitting than a randomly drawn live version.

Something else that bothers me is the inclusion of alternate and/or live versions filling in for superior studio versions. Why is the live version of "All Along the Watchtower" from '74 included while Jimi Hendrix's masterful recording is highly praised by Dylan in the booklet? Surely the goal wasn't to make Dylan's sound incredibly inferior. Perhaps that was an oversight, very much like the exclusion of one of Dylan's best studio recordings, "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue", in favor of a worn and ragged performance from an acoustic set during a '66 electric tour. Those two songs are top tier, yet they're reduced to underwhelming wastes of space.

Ugh.

At least the booklet is worth keeping.

At this point, it's the only reason for me.

Here's my Biograph chronology for the lazy and curious:

Code:
1962 - Baby, Let Me Follow You Down (Bob Dylan)
       Baby, I'm in the Mood for You (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan; outtake)
       Mixed-Up Confusion (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan; outtake)
1963 - Blowin' in the Wind (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan)
       Masters of War (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan)
       Percy's Song (The Times They are A-Changin'; outtake)
       Lay Down Your Weary Tune (The Times They are A-Changin'; outtake)
1964 - The Times They are A-Changin' (The Times They are A-Changin')
       The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll (The Times They are A-Changin')
       To Ramona (Another Side of Bob Dylan)
       It Ain't Me, Babe (Another Side of Bob Dylan)
1965 - I'll Keep It with Mine (Bringing It All Back Home; outtake)
       Subterranean Homesick Blues (Bringing It All Back Home)
       Mr. Tambourine Man (Bringing It All Back Home)
       Positively 4th Street (Highway 61 Revisited; outtake)
       Like a Rolling Stone (Highway 61 Revisited)
       Tombstone Blues (Highway 61 Revisited)
       Jet Pilot (Blonde on Blonde; outtake)
       Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? (Blonde on Blonde; outtake)
       I Wanna Be Your Lover (Blonde on Blonde; outtake)
       I Want You (Blonde on Blonde)
       Just Like a Woman (Blonde on Blonde)
1966 - I Don't Believe You (Live; May 6, 1966, Belfast, Northern Ireland)
       It's All Over Now, Baby Blue (Live; May 17, 1966, Manchester, England)
       Visions of Johanna (Live; May 26, 1966, London, England)
1967 - Quinn the Eskimo (The Mighty Quinn) (The Basement Tapes)
       Million Dollar Bash (The Basement Tapes)
       Dear Landlord (John Wesley Harding)
       I'll Be Your Baby Tonight (John Wesley Harding)
1969 - Lay Lady Lay (Nashville Skyline)
1970 - If Not for You (New Morning)
       Time Passes Slowly (New Morning)
1971 - I Shall Be Released (Greatest Hits Vol. II)
1973 - Knockin' on Heaven's Door (Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid)
       Forever Young (demo)
1974 - On a Night Like This (Planet Waves)
       You Angel You (Planet Waves)
       All Along the Watchtower (Live; Feb. 14, 1974, Los Angeles, CA (afternoon))
       Most Likely You Go Your Way (Live; Feb 14, 1974, Lose Angeles, CA (evening))
       Up to Me (Blood on the Tracks; outtake)
       You're a Big Girl Now (Blood on the Tracks; New York sessions)
       Tangled Up in Blue (Blood on the Tracks)
1975 - Abandoned Love (Desire; outtake)
       Romance in Durango (Live; Dec. 4, 1975, Montreal, Quebec, Canada)
       Isis (Live; Dec. 4, 1975 - Montreal, Quebec, Canada)
1978 - Señor (Tales of Yankee Power) (Street-Legal)
1979 - Gotta Serve Somebody (Slow Train Coming)
       I Believe in You (Slow Train Coming)
1980 - Solid Rock (Saved)
1981 - Carribean Wind (Shot of Love; outtake)
       The Groom's Still Waiting at the Altar (Shot of Love; outtake)
       Every Grain of Sand (Shot of Love)
       Heart of Mine (Live; Nov. 10, 1981, New Orleans, LA)


:)


Can I be if sometimes I lie?

Author:  michael curtius [ Mon September 16th, 2013, 09:11 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: What about Biograph ?

... back to 1985 again ... Then , I thought , I don´t buy that, cause it´s just some sort of song compilation of already
released albums. I think , I can remember just a little my feelings from these days: No - I don´t liked that Biograph-Box.
One year later, I´ve bought my first cd ... and then , step by step , only buying cds for twenty years. New start with vinyls in 2012 :) , buying these ones, I couldn´t afford in the seventies and eighties.

After playin´ the BS 10 vinyls day after day, night after night ... oh I love Pretty Saro so much , I can´t tell :? :?
- now I´m playin´ the Biograph ones day .... great songs like Percy´s Song, Isis live ! Hey man ! 5 new (old) Bob Dylan Lps !
Positively 4th Street is one the best for me ever , just great !

So - the times and feelings are changin´a lot. I feel that - along - the record player is movin´that Biograph LPs - a bit like hearin´ to BS 10 - a few years later - it starts - the BS. But there is another story, that has been in anotehr world for me, I have to explore now - I´ve never seen this - the real bootleg vinyls ..., they have extraodinary covers - wow!

Thanx Rainwater! For your work ! You tellin´much about, what I was thinkin´of, I ´ll print now your post (really!) and put it in my Biograph-Box ! :)

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