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 Post subject: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon November 7th, 2011, 01:21 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
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Location: City of Angels
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqQ4vNqGWs8

Delia was a gambling girl, gambled all around,
Delia was a gambling girl, she laid her money down.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Delia's dear ol' mother took a trip out West,
When she returned, little Delia gone to rest.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Delia's daddy weeped, Delia's momma moaned,
Wouldn't have been so bad if the poor girl died at home.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Curtis' looking high, Curtis' looking low,
He shot poor Delia down with a cruel forty-four.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

High up on the housetops, high as I can see,
Looking for them rounders, looking out for me.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Men in Atlanta, tryin' to pass for white,
Delia's in the graveyard, boys, six feet out of sight.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Judge says to Curtis, "What's this noise about?"
"All about them rounders, Judge, tryin' to cut me out."
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Curtis said to the judge, "What might be my fine?"
Judge says, "Poor boy, you got ninety-nine."
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Curtis' in the jail house, drinking from an old tin cup,
Delia's in the graveyard, she ain't gettin' up.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Delia, oh Delia, how can it be?
You loved all them rounders, never did love me.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

Delia, oh Delia, how can it be?
You wanted all them rounders, never had time for me.
All the friends I ever had are gone.

'Delia' is one sad tale-two or more versions mixed into one. the song has no middle range, comes whipping around the corner, seems to be about counterfeit loyalty. Delia herself, no Queen Gertrude, Elizabeth 1 or even Evita Peron, doesnt ride a Harley Davidson across the desert highway, doesnt need a blood change & would never go on a shopping spree. the guy in the courthouse sounds like a pimp in primary colors. he's not interested in mosques on the temple mount, armageddon or world war III, doesnt put his face in his knees & weep & wears no dunce hat, makes no apology & is doomed to obscurity. does this song have rectitude? you bet. toleration of the unacceptable leads to the last round-up. the singer's not talking from a head of booze. Jerry Garcia showed me.'

-from the World Gone Wrong liner notes

Obviously, the best place to learn of this beautiful song and Dylan's place in its history can be found in Sean Wilentz' grand Bob Dylan In America, but there's so much to be said beyond just history.
For my money, Dylan's version on the album is one of the most emotional performances of the song ever of the song. He sings it from such a intimately personal place, he truly inhabits the song, not just tells the story. When he sings 'All the friends I ever had are gone', there are few times in my Dylan listening history, that I've felt so near to Dylan's heart here. It's simply powerful....

The closest someone's come has maybe been Blind Willie McTell:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcS16tpA6-c

I also think The Supper Club performance is equally exemplary in its telling, in fact there are times I think it's superior. Bob's voice and telling fills the song with emotion, I can almost feel Curtis' pain, the Judge's sad judgement, the parents' mourning, and most of all Bob's love for all involved...

New York City NY
November 17 1993
http://www.sendspace.com/file/jvlb8q

Anyone have any other versions of this great song to share? There are so many!
Do we like Bob's as much as I do? What about another version from Dylan? Some do not like The Supper Club apparently:(.....
Let me know Rainers!!!


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon November 7th, 2011, 06:59 GMT 
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I love Dylan's interpretation of Delia.

An excellent version of Delia appeared as a bonus track on Jolie Holland's single Sasha.

Image

Here is the wonderful Ms Holland performing Delia at her piano in Brooklyn -

http://youtu.be/qxpGWYbJYQs


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon November 7th, 2011, 10:11 GMT 
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And a great version from 2000
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dkx1viJfchY


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon November 7th, 2011, 15:52 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 16th, 2008, 21:48 GMT
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Location: Connecticut
Great Version & delievery here at the supper club. I think those shows are overrated, save for 5-6 songs / versions & this is one of them that's a gem! Superb! thanks Marker MEZ


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon November 7th, 2011, 19:05 GMT 
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Location: Down by the banks of the Royal Canal.
Bob's a pretty clean Blind Willie McTell cover. So he 'comes close', yes. :)
There's interesting info of the original murder of Delia Green from Georgia on Wikipedia.
There are (at least) 2 different version/strands of the murder ballad known, here's a link to the other one (Delia's gone, one more round), told from the murderer's point of view, by Calypso Blind Blake (not to mix with the Blues singer of the same name).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ampGp47E5QQ


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon November 7th, 2011, 19:08 GMT 
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^ Here's Johnny Cash's version Delia's Gone


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Fri December 2nd, 2011, 03:27 GMT 
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SirDogg wrote:
And a great version from 2000
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dkx1viJfchY

This has been a favorite Delia for the past 10 years. I never knew there was a video attached.
Thank you Dogg!


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Fri December 2nd, 2011, 06:01 GMT 
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DELIA

Dylan

Delia is one sad tale-two or more versions mixed into one. the song has no middle range, comes whipping around the corner, seems to be about counterfeit loyalty. Delia herself, no Queen Gertrude, Elizabeth 1 or even Evita Peron, doesnt ride a Harley Davidson across the desert highway, doesnt need a blood change & would never go on a shopping spree. the guy in the courthouse sounds like a pimp in primary colors. he's not interested in mosques on the temple mount, armageddon or world war III, doesnt put his face in his knees & weep & wears no dunce hat, makes no apology & is doomed to obscurity. does this song have rectitude? you bet. toleration of the unacceptable leads to the last round-up. the singer's not talking from a head of booze. Jerry Garcia showed me

Oliver Trager

Devastating. Delia, a low-key black murder ballad, is as haunting and diabolical as anything Dylan ever sang. After murdering Delia, a gambling girl who simply does not care for him, the killer (and the song’s narrator), Curtis, goes on the lam, is eventually captured, tried, and sentenced to, as the judge in the song says, “ninety-nine.” Alone in his cell, Curtis drinks from an old tin cup and finishes the song to Delia, whose ghost seems to linger close by. As he sings, Curtis finally begins to sense the truth in the song’s short chorus, “All the friends I ever had are gone.”

Dylan did some character study on Delia and Curtis in his World Gone Wrong liner notes. Pointing out that the song is about “counterfeit loyalty”, Dylan wrote, “Delia herself, no Queen Gertrude, Elizabeth 1 or even Evita Peron, the guy in the courthouse sounds like a pimp in primary colors. he's not interested in mosques on the temple mount, armageddon or world war III.”

Originally an American prison song that transmuted into a honky-tonk number, Delia has a broad, circuitous, and confusing history. Dylan himself acknowledged in the World Gone Wrong liner notes that his Delia is “two or more versions mixed into one.”

There are dozens of versions of Delia floating around but Blind Willie McTell probably has a lock on the song in the folk consciousness, even though none of his recordings of Delia saw daylight until 1972. He first recorded the song – which he called Little Delia – on 5 November 1940, in Atlanta for one of John A Lomax’s field recording expeditions for the Library of Congress. His definitively plaintive rendering of the song, the one that makes it his, came from his 1949 session in Atlanta, which also produced Broke Down Engine, another World Gone Wrong track. In McTell’s hands, Delia took on unearthly qualities worthy of a Shakespearean tragedy performed on an opening night at the Globe Theatre. And so is Dylan’s compassionate, lucent version. His Delia achieves a depth of feeling hardly equalled in his entire career and is more or less a mixture of McTell’s and a North Carolina variant, All My Friends Are Gone. Interestingly, both McTell and Dylan recorded Delia when they were about 50 years old.

But the other versions, histories, and arrangements of Delia no doubt seeped into Dylan’s vision of the song as well. He was probably aware of Delia’s Gone (One More Round) popularised by Bahamian blues singer Blind Blake, a kitschy version of Joseph Spence (who is not to be confused with the great Chicago bluesman and songster of the same name). A true American hybrid in whatever version is unearthed and too old to have a definitive version anyway, Delia is an extension of the traditional late-19th century ballads well known to both black and white performers.

Less attention, somewhat surprisingly, has been paid to the historical roots of Delia. A Georgian by the name of John Garst did some poking around in the local Savannah archives in 2000 and discovered that a 14-year-old girl named Delia Green was shot by Moses “Coony” Houston, approximately 15 years of age, in Savannah’s poor, black, and violent Yamacraw neighbourhood shortly before midnight on 24 December 1900. Delia died in the afternoon of Christmas Day on her bed at home. Newspapers and court papers reveal somewhat conflicting evidence as to the circumstances surrounding the shooting. The basic story appears to be that Delia was living at the home (perhaps a brothel) of a family named West. She and Coony had been, according to the newspapers, “more or less intimate” for several months prior to the shooting. But they had a row on Christmas Eve that resulted in the contents of West’s pistol being discharged into Delia’s gut. Whether this was an accident or not (Coony claimed he was merely clowning around with the gun when it went off) or whether the gathering at the West domicile involved the consumption of alcohol are a couple of points of contention that came out in the trial. In the end, Coony was sentenced to life in prison but paroled after 12 years.

An old recording circulates of Dylan performing a version of Delia very early in his career from a May 1960 party in Minneapolis. He returned to Delia as a powerful statement when he included the tragic tale on his World Gone Wrong collection and performed a few dagger-in-the-heart versions around the time of the release in 1993 in both acoustic band and electric arrangements. Dylan shelved the song for a decade but revisited Delia at four 2000 shows, again as an acoustic offering.

In his December 1993 Mojo magazine review of World Gone Wrong, Bill Flanagan diagnosed the song and Dylan’s relationship with it, writing, “When Dylan sings, in this version of Delia, “All the friends I ever had are gone,” it breaks your heart. His world-worn voice reveals the cracks behind his stoicism in a way that this most unsentimental of singers would ever allow in his lyrics. The weight of nobility and loss are as appropriate to this older Dylan’s singing as anger and hunger were to the snarl of his youth.”

Derek Barker

The first known Dylan performance of a song entitled Delia was captured on tape at the St Paul, Minnesota apartment of Karen Wallace. Although poor quality extracts of the 27-song tape, which was made in May 1960, circulate among collectors, this song is not included on the circulating tapes and it is therefore not possible to establish which version of Delia was played by Dylan. The complete tape remains in the possession of Karen Moynihan, nee Wallace.

The next occurrence of a song called Delia was in 1992 at the State Theatre in Sydney, Australia (15 April 1992). The song was played twice on this tour and in May 1993 Dylan recorded an exemplary rendition of the song for his World Gone Wrong album.

Delia was then performed at the second New York Supper Club show (17 November 1993) before disappearing from the setlists for seven years. The song was resurrected and played four times on Dylan's 2000 European tour, the last of those performances being in England at the Telewest Arena in Newcastle (19 September 2000). It encompassed a beautiful vocal performance from Dylan, filled with wisdom and regret, and is well worth tracking down.

The song gained prominence as Delia Gone when it was recorded by Bahaman musician Blind Blake (real name Blake Alphonso Higgs). The song was included on Blake's "succinctly" titled album (pause for breath) Blind Blake And The Royal Victoria Hotel "Calypso" Orchestra: A Third Album of Bahamian Song. The album was released in several formats including a set of five 78 rpms (ART ALP-6), a 12-inch 33rpm LP (AL 6), and a two record 45 rpm set (Art AEP 6). All releases were dated 1952.

Variants of this sad tale have been covered by a multitude of artists in an array of genres and under various titles, including Delia (or Delia’s) Gone, Delia, Little Delia, All My Friends Are Gone, One More Rounder Gone, All I Done Had Done Gone, Poor Gal, She Gone and She's Dead, She's Dead And Gone.

Blind Blake did not write the song however; that accolade has been lost in the mists of time, and although field recordings date back to the 1920s (it was recorded by jazz band leader Jimmy Gordon at around that time), the title of Delia arrived later.

Although, as stated earlier, we are uncertain as to exactly which version of Delia Dylan sang in May 1960 in the apartment of Karen Wallace, his later performances owe much more to Blind Willie McTell's 1940 Library of Congress recording than to that of Blind Blake. McTell's version is currently available on Complete Library Of Congress Recordings (1940) (Document BDCD-6001). It' is probably a little futile to attempt to pin Dylan's version down any further because in the liner notes which accompany his album World Gone Wrong , Dylan writes that his recording of Delia is "one sad tale" derived from "two or more versions" of the song.

In any event, Delia's tale appears to be based on actual fact. In 1928, Robert Winslow Gordon informed the Library of Congress that he had tracked the source of the "Cooney Killed Delia" song to Yamacraw, a black neighbourhood of Savannah, Georgia.

Delia Green, aged 14, was shot by Moses "Coony" Houston, aged 16, at about 11 o'clock in the evening of Christmas Eve, 1900. Houston appears to have been mocking Delia, whom he was seeing at the time, and interred to others that he was having a sexual relationship with her. Delia denied this and an argument ensued. Everything quietened down, but as the party was breaking up and the couple were leaving, Houston took out a .39 calibre pistol and shot Delia. The doctor who attended the incident informed newspapermen that the girl would not live and at around 3 am on Christmas morning 1900, Delia died. Houston was convicted of Delia Green's murder but due to his age there was a recommendation for mercy. He was sentenced to life with hard labour, but was paroled in 1913.

Dylan's performances from Sydney (15 April 1992) and New York (17 November 1993) can be found on the bootleg CD Genuine Never Ending Tour Covers Collection 1988-2000. Both of these renditions are excellent but the New York performance is particularly heartfelt and should be in everyone's collection.


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Fri December 2nd, 2011, 07:07 GMT 
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Haven't heard many other versions other than Bob's...can't imagine liking them as much as his. It's just so sad the way he sings "all the friends I've ever had are gone"...it's heartbreaking...
and puts one in mind of how sad it is to lose a friend...or more.


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Fri December 2nd, 2011, 19:22 GMT 
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I agree that Dylan's version is closest to McTell's, but note that on the 1940 Library of Congress recording Blind Willie doesn't end each verse with "All the friends I've ever had are gone", but instead sings (ungrammatically) "She's all I ever had has gone".


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun December 18th, 2011, 00:47 GMT 
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Waylon Jennings sings Delia's Gone:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWfGMkQmyPE


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 07:35 GMT 
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Bump.
Nice to see Delia crop up in tonight's Vegas set list.
First time in 12 years that it's been pulled out in concert.
Nice!


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 08:26 GMT 
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I love the track, even more so after lerning the history in Wilentz' book. Someone care to repuload the Supper Club version?


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 11:33 GMT 
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kimriX wrote:
I love the track, even more so after lerning the history in Wilentz' book. Someone care to repuload the Supper Club version?



http://www.mediafire.com/?boaf26863g69d6h


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 13:48 GMT 

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Thanks a lot, Mr. H-S!! :D


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 13:53 GMT 
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This is a great song


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 14:11 GMT 
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Still Go Barefoot wrote:
Delia, oh Delia, how can it be?
Played 9 times (if we include Karen Wallace's house)

Listed latest to earliest

Oct 27, 2012
Las Vegas, NV
Mandalay Bay Events Center


Sep 19, 2000
Newcastle, England
Newcastle Arena

Jul 01, 2000
Del Mar, CA
Grandstand

May 25, 2000
Regensburg, Germany
Donauarena

May 06, 2000
Zurich, Switzerland
Hallenstadion

Nov 17, 1993
New York, NY
The Supper Club

May 14, 1992
Los Angeles, CA
The Pantages Theater

Apr 15, 1992
Sydney, Australia
State Theatre


May 01, 1960
St. Paul, MN
The Home Of Karen Wallace



Info gleaned from bobdylan.com


I put this in Las Vegas Live Set thread, but I think it also belongs here.


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 16:42 GMT 
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DELIA LAST NIGHT!! GREAT PERFORMANCE!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okqEVeNqBhc


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 16:46 GMT 
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delia_Green


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 16:49 GMT 

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The key to the whole thing, of course, is the devastating refrain: all the friends I ever had are gone...

Delia's parents say it. Curtis (Cuttey?) says it. The judge says it upon condemning him. The song's narrator says it. It's as though there's a loneliness at the heart of the whole world, which is ultimately what explains all this tragedy, all this cruelty. He killed her, why? On some level, it's because 'all the friends he ever had are gone.' The judge pitilessly condemns him for life, why? Because 'all the friends he ever had are gone.' In the lamentation of the parents, Delia's death is really just one more woe piled atop this primal wound. Even the singer, he seems to be relaying this tale as a metaphor for some inexplicable underlying grief. The primordial loneliness becomes something almost like original sin, the central loss that drives everything else.

It's a great example of how traditional songs can work, that pastiche technique that consciously or unconsciously brings together distinctive motifs that deepen one another.


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 19:18 GMT 
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Lone Pilgrim wrote:
The key to the whole thing, of course, is the devastating refrain: all the friends I ever had are gone...

Delia's parents say it. Curtis (Cuttey?) says it. The judge says it upon condemning him. The song's narrator says it. It's as though there's a loneliness at the heart of the whole world, which is ultimately what explains all this tragedy, all this cruelty. He killed her, why? On some level, it's because 'all the friends he ever had are gone.' The judge pitilessly condemns him for life, why? Because 'all the friends he ever had are gone.' In the lamentation of the parents, Delia's death is really just one more woe piled atop this primal wound. Even the singer, he seems to be relaying this tale as a metaphor for some inexplicable underlying grief. The primordial loneliness becomes something almost like original sin, the central loss that drives everything else.

It's a great example of how traditional songs can work, that pastiche technique that consciously or unconsciously brings together distinctive motifs that deepen one another.
This.


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Sun October 28th, 2012, 23:27 GMT 
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Johanna Parker wrote:

Delia Green (born c. 1886, died December 25, 1900), a fourteen-year-old African-American murder victim, has been identified as the likely inspiration for several well-known traditional American songs, usually known by the titles "Delia" and "Delia's Gone."


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon October 29th, 2012, 00:43 GMT 
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grwarrington wrote:
DELIA LAST NIGHT!! GREAT PERFORMANCE!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okqEVeNqBhc



I waited two hours to hear that and now I am scarred forever.


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon October 29th, 2012, 00:45 GMT 
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Seriously, you have no idea how much I was looking forward to it.


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 Post subject: Re: Track Talk 286 Delia
PostPosted: Mon October 29th, 2012, 00:50 GMT 
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smoke wrote:
Seriously, you have no idea how much I was looking forward to it.

Downright mean.


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