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 Post subject: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Wed October 12th, 2011, 03:50 GMT 
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FOOT OF PRIDE

John Bauldie

As this collection has gone some way towards proving, there are many wonderful unreleased Dylan songs, but at no time since the early-1960s was he so prolific as he was in 1982 and 1983 when he was preparing material for Infidels. As impressive a record as Infidels undoubtedly is, a handful of exceptional songs did not make it on to the LP. Two of the outtakes were, it seems, at one time originally intended for inclusion. Foot Of Pride is one of them, a lyrically enigmatic song in which Dylan shows once again just what a great singer he is, coping with the song’s metrical complexities with impressive ease. Only one commentator has ever been bold (or foolhardy) enough to tackle an appreciation of Foot Of Pride. Writing in The Telegrapg, Terry Gans fully admitted the difficulties that face the listener who hopes to come to terms with what is going on in the song. Nevertheless, he observes that Foot Of Pride comes across as another of Dylan’s “the wicked are gonna get it / propaganda is all phoney – and those who allow themselves to be manipulated by those who would manipulate deserve what they get” songs.

Foot Of Pride, crammed as it is with Biblical allusions, seems to be offering one primary warning – about the perils of vanity. Having presented an extraordinary series of images in its opening section, only in verses four and five does Foot Of Pride become direct rather than allusive in its condemnation of those false prophets who misude religion and faith, abuse trust, hoodwink the gullible, all in the pursuit of earthly riches. But although they will seem to prosper in the world, making “all this money from sin”, and, apparently, never have to face any kind of comeuppance as the song’s chorus insists, there is a price to be paid, eventually and irrevocably, when “the hot iron blows” and when “the foot of pride comes down”, as it will – “ain’t no going back”.

Dylan has never painted as convincing a picture of the fallen world, of a 20th century Babylon, as he does in this song – neither has he been as overtly wrathful in his abhorrence of the corrupters and corrupted, nor as confident that eternal judgement is to be meted out at last beyond this world, and that for the wicked, the dividers of the word of truth, vengeance will be terrible, swift and sure.

Paul Williams

Foot Of Pride is in a sense written from the same place of hostility and anguish and self-righteousness as Man Of Peace and Neighborhood Bully and Union Sundown, but I like it, I can listen to it over and over again, I intuitively put it in a class with Dylan's better work rather than with his clunkers. Why? Because of its intelligence, its sincerity, its originality, its great sound and superb vocal performance. Most of all I think what sets it apart from Man Of Peace etc (and what makes the intelligence and sincerity possible) is that it acknowledges and shares the anguish the speaker is feeling. It moves beyond smug righteousness into the wild uncharted land of self-doubt, and disappointment, and honest confusion, anger, despair.

Foot Of Pride is in fact, in the words Dylan used to describe the composition of Like A Rolling Stone, "a long piece of vomit." And it rings with conviction. What is it about? It is about how pride destroys us and turns us into monsters. The four middle verses are in fact a gallery of monsters, and the song could be taken as another parade of devils (like Man Of Peace) except for the subtle but crucial difference that in this song Dylan gets across the true horror – that these devils not only confront us, they are us. We become them, with our stupidity, cupidity, vanity, lust, self-import¬ance, timidity – we not only are menaced by them, we cross the line and are transformed by them (and our own weaknesses) into "anything that they want" us to be.

I find in the first and last verses a suggestion of structure, in that the song seems to be about, or anyway inspired by, a funeral. The "he" in the first verse seems to be the same person as the "he" in the last verse ("He reached too high and was thrown back to the ground" / "Did he make it to the top? Well he probably did and dropped"). This is helpful because it points ever so subtly towards a solution to the extremely recalcitrant problem of identity that is central to the songs recorded at these sessions.

This problem can be summed up (switching songs for a mo¬ment) in a simple but baffling question – Who is Jokerman?

I have been reading commentaries on the song, and none of the ones I have seen has an answer that satisfies me. Many people assume that he is Dylan; some see him as Christ, or Satan; and one or two seem to perceive that he could be all three. Yes, but how? Nick de Somogyi is most insightful on this subject, in his essay Jokermen And Thieves, noting the connection between Jokerman and the joker in All Along The Watchtower. De Somogyi sees both these figures as deriving from the Holy Fool (wise innocent) por¬trayed in the zero card of the Tarot, and notes the further connec¬tion of this character with the fool in King Lear, with Dionysus and other tricksters, with Everyman, and with Christ. Dylan is certainly conscious at the very least of the Tarot connection, as he acknowl¬edges in the line (from the earlier take of Jokerman), "So drunk, standing in the middle of the street / Directing traffic with a small dog at your feet." The small dog is from the picture on the Waite deck Tarot card of The Fool, a picture which also resonates in my opinion with the chorus of Jokerman (dancing high and free).

So what? Good question. If the song is specifically about Dylan, it is insufferably vain – I do not think there is any other in¬stance of him describing himself in such pukingly romantic terms, nor does this seem consistent with his 1983 mood as revealed in almost all these songs. If it is specifically about Christ, why is this strict by-the-book Christian and / or Jew now describing him as "born with a snake in both your fists" like Hercules or some God with the head of a hyena? And so forth. The prince in the last verse is almost certainly the Prince of Darkness, and whoever the Joker¬man is, one is left wondering why he does not show any response to the Prince's evil acts.

Fascinating, baffling song. Of course interpretation is not often the best way to penetrate Dylan's art, but some songs aggressively confront us with riddles. It is possible of course that the song is just more muddy thinking – we have some familiarity at this point with the unconscious aspects of Dylan's technique, we know he does not always pay attention to what he might be saying. But while there are aspects of both composition and performance that make Joker¬man annoying, even grating at times, it still has a grace and power about it that takes it out of the realm of "imitation Dylan" (a realm it superficially belongs in, to be sure; newspaper critics predictably greeted the album as a return of the good old boy, thanks largely to the sound of this song and their first impressions of its language, its imagery).

Consciously or unconsciously, Dylan is saying something here, something that is quite important to him. We can feel that as we listen (I have a preference for the earlier vocal take, which is less contrived and therefore warmer and easier to listen to over and over; but I must admit that the beauty of the later vocal, though I mistrust it, is also quite moving at times). But what?

I do not know. But the funeral in Foot Of Pride is helpful. The man who has died is certainly human; is not Christ (though his death inspires the preacher to talk about Christ betrayed); is cer¬tainly not Satan. He could be Dylan, I suppose. When Dylan sings, "Yes I guess I loved him too, I can still see him in my mind climbing that hill," I can't help thinking of Christ (I also think of Mercer in Philip K Dick's Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep?, but never mind). It would probably be a fair reading to say that the singer is thinking of a dead friend who at times reminds him of himself, at times also reminds him of Christ, and who also confronts him with the horror of our human failings and the inevitability of retribu¬tion. Regarding the old question of "Who is Queen Jane?" (in Queen Jane Approximately), I like to think it is Dylan seeing himself (his ambition, his indifference to others) in his friend Joan, and using his hostile feelings towards her as a horse to ride as he releases his self-judgment, his deep feelings of self-dissatisfaction. In the same way, Dylan can be moved simultaneously in Foot Of Pride by feelings of love and by feelings of repugnance and castigation, feelings that can seem to him to be directed outward but which as he lets them out take on the full fury of his own self-hatred – and serve also as a covert expression of his dissatisfac¬tion with God as well. If the world is shit, as Dylan tells us it is in these songs, it is, according to Dylan's sincere beliefs, the fault of the corruptibility of men; it is we who have betrayed Christ. Unspo¬ken however beneath the surface feelings of anyone undergoing a crisis of faith (as most of us do at least once a year) is the firm, ego-based conviction that it is just the other way around – He has betrayed us, betrayed me.

These feelings stir around inside a person, and sometimes pour out, as at the Infidels sessions, in a tempest, a cavalcade, of hostile ambivalence. Nothing makes any sense. I do not want to talk about it (though I cannot stop talking). And all of you are to blame.

So who is the Jokerman? He is a clown. A hero, a fool, a devil, a saint, a joke, a mockery. He is me (the person singing) in the pathetic absurdity of my self-idealization. He is the projection of my own confusion. I do not know if he is Christ or an imitation of Christ. If the latter, is he a holy fool, or a foolish infidel, or the Devil incarnate? He is a superstar, ha ha. The thoughts whirl around. The chorus attempts to idealize him gently as a dancer, to connect him with that reliable old identity, the devotee of the tambourine man. But it does not quite work. Freedom is no longer enough of an answer. "With truth so far off, what good will it do?" The speaker is too full of dread. Nighttime means aliveness in the chorus. In the fourth verse it means peace. But in the fifth verse it surely means death. Not death like release, or liberation; there is a little taste of good old vengeance in it, but mostly it just seems to signify that soon the jig will be up.

I am babbling. I don't always like this song, and I suspect those who do like it of not always listening past the surface. And yet I acknowledge it as a powerful and probably very accurate expression of the singer's inner turmoil. His efforts at oversimpli¬fying his identity beautifully betray and reveal the true complex¬ity of his situation.

(And for his sins, he will be forced to release this self-portrait on an album, and sing it at concerts at which he will be greeted like a king. Afterwards they will write reviews in which he will be dismissed as a fool. All part of the ongoing joke.)

Oliver Trager

A layed, enigmatic dirge originally intended for release on Infidels, Foot Of Pride was one of a handful of exceptional pieces Dylan composed during a particularly fertile period in the early-1989s. Not only is it lyrically dense, but it also allows Dylan to show off what a deceptively good singer he is as he deftly handles the song’s odd meter with casual ease.

A song that runneth over with biblical allusions, Foot Of Pride is, as Terry Gans described it in his article, It Was Like A Revelation – Bob Dylan’s Foot Of Pride, in The Telegraph #21 (summer 1983), one of those Dylan songs in which “the wicked are gonna get it, propaganda is all phony, and those who allow themselves to be manipulated by those who manipulate deserve what they get.” Indeed, it is as if Dylan is combining the gray, conspiratorial “they” populating his mid-1960s work with the unrepentant vitriol of his gospel muse into an even more threatening vision of the world.

Few have attempted to decipher the complexities layering this song (Michael Gray did surgeon’s work breaking it down in his book Song And Dance Man III: The Art Of Bob Dylan), but the primary warning here would seem to concern the perils of vanity. In issuing the warning, Dylan presents a dizzying series of nightmarish images that could have poured off the pages of Dante or the Bible (the books of Daniel, Deuteronomy, Psalms), or be drawn from everyday clichés in its condemnation of charlatans who toy with what little faith humanity may still possess, philistines who abuse trust, prostitutes of the spirit and flesh who think little of manipulating the naïve in their quest for base power and riches, and bunco artists in bootleg Armani suits who profit from sin and spill their spare change on building “big universities to study in” as if to justify their avarice. Though the evil ones may seem as if they are prospering in the short-run, the song insists that a price will be paid when “the hot iron blows” because, in true Book of Revelation style, “When the foot of pride comes down, their ain’t no going back.”

As for the many literal, biblical, and pop-culture references crammed into this bluesy, six-stanza fugue, a brief glance at the song’s first few lines alone should suffice to demonstrate how deeply Dylan can tangle up a lyric. The title itself selivers one right from Psalms 36:11 (“Let not the foot of pride come against me, and let not the hand of the wicked remove me”) and then immediately goes to the Bible’s story of Daniel in the lion’s den for the song’s initial ten words (“Like the lion tears the flesh off of a man”), recalling the Old Testament’s battle royale between man and beast, and the beast within. Then, as if to emphasise the black humour here, Dylan’s lyric mentions the singing of Danny Boy at somebody’s (man’s?) funeral – another backward glance at the Book of Daniel and a nod to the famous Irish drinking song. Musing on the deceased’s passing (“It’s like the earth just opened and swallowed him up”), Dylan keeps the Bible in the foreground with this line’s references to Numbers 16:29-32 and Deuteronomy 11:6.

Dylan sings Foot Of Pride like a one-eyed undertaker blowing a futile horn on a return trip to Desolation Row. Or maybe that was Hamlet contemplating the inevitability of death as he considered the Jester’s grinning skull. But this time around, the narrator appears a bit wiser and more cautious. When he introduces us to Red (a nickname and colour that itself begs comparison with satan), the crazed, drunken businessman who, instead of putting some bleachers out in the sun to promote the apocalypse (as he might have in Highway 61 Revisited), is now merely selling tickets to a plane crash, Dylan comes off as if he has metten thousand “cash only” scoundrels just like him. As for messing around with Red’s girl for hire, Miss Delilah (a name obviously pointing to the corrupted princess who played Samson for a fool), Dylan implies that it is okay to look – just be sure not to touch. And, as in Desolation Row and other songs from his work of the mid-1960s, Dylan cannot resist populating the irregularly rhyming death march with at least one icon from popular mythology, Errol Flynn, whose shady legacy (his weakness for underage girls and Nazis is well documented enough) fits in perfectly with this chilling shadow song.

The music, or lack thereof, for Foot Of Pride is well chosen too – monotonously trundling forward and increasing in tempo like a horse-drawn funeral carriage travelling a country road as a thunderstorm quickly approaches from the west, with each lengthy verse punctuated at its gnawing conclusion with a clarion-sounding harmonica bleat. Additionally, and quite unusually, Dylan starts singing almost as soon as the song begins, underlying the sense of x urgency as he raves. And did anyone ever sing the words “Oh yeah!”, as Dylan does twice at the song’s end, with such conviction? The “sky is falling” cry Little Chicken utters while running around the village square, Foot Of Pride is most assuredly not.

Perhaps Dylan’s angriest portrait of a present-day Babylon, Foot Of Pride is scathing in its cold-eyed depiction of depravity. It is as if Dylan, back in 1983, just wanted to remind everyone that he still possessed the old prophetic visionary power that could hatch a song like this as easily as he could take a drag on a cheap cigar and blow its thick blue smoke in the devil’s face just for a laugh.

Clinton Heylin

Published lyric/s: Lyrics 85; Lyrics 04. [Recorded version: Words Fill My Head.]

Known studio recordings: Power Station Studios, NYC, 22 April 1983 – 9 takes; 23 April 1983 – 17 takes; 25 April 1983 – 9 takes; 26 April 1983 – 3 takes; 27 April 1983 – 5 takes; 29 April 1983 – 1 take. [TBS]

“Let not the foot of pride come against me, and let not the hand of the wicked remove me.” Psalms 36:11

Dylan straps on his Jeremiah garb again to deliver a “Yonder Comes The Sin Of Pride” to the Greed is Good generation – for whom he reserves a couplet just as apposite in 2009 as it was in 1983:

“They like to take all this money from sin, build big universities to study in / Sing "Amazing Grace" all the way to the Swiss banks.”

He has definitely still got it in for the kind of education dispensed in college.

Foot Of Pride remains one of his most unrelenting polemics, and one of his best. This time he wraps what is really one long rant in the language of Kings, while namechecking a number of popular songs co-opted by the proud to cover their parasitic tracks: Danny Boy, Amazing Grace and even Abraham, Martin and John (from which he quotes the line, “Only the good die young”). The generic “You'll Love Me Till The Morning, Stranger” does not really exist, but sounds like it should. All of these are valedictories one might hear at a wake – which is fitting because Foot Of Pride is told from the vantage point of a mourner at a funeral, looking down on a man the narrator had known, and looking back on the life he led, as “the earth just opened and swallowed him up”. At the end of the song, he even delivers the perfect eulogy to a man killed by his own hubris – as befits a song whose title on the tape logs was “Too Late”.

“Yes, I guess I loved him, too,
I can still see him in my mind, climbing that hill,
Did he make it to the top, well, he probably did and dropped,
Struck down by the strength of the will.”

It is hard to resist interpreting these lines as a reference to George Mallory's ill-fated ascent of Everest in 1924. Mallory a heroic figure to many of Dylan's generation, was indeed sighted “climbing that hill”, and has been the subject of 85 years of speculation as to whether he “made it to the top” before he dropped.

It has been suggested that the song was prompted by a real funeral for a friend – Christian singer Keith Green, with whom Dylan recorded back in 1980. If Green, who died in a plane crash in July 1982, is in there, the song is surprisingly unsentimental about his compadre in Christ. Our Saviour appears at song's end as the man with no name, to inform the narrator:

“Let the dead bury the dead [a direct quote from Jesus, “Follow me; and let the dead bury their dead” Matthew 8:22 / Your time will come.”

Not surprisingly, Christ stalks much of the song, appearing first in verse two:

“He got a brother named James, don't forget faces and names,
Sunken cheeks and his blood is mixed,
He looks straight into the sun, and says,
“Revenge is mine, hon. Say one more stupid thing to me, before the final nail is driven in.””

No question, this is the Christ who has come to judge ('Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord' (Romans 12:19)), Dylan mocking those who “don't believe in mercy / Judgement on them is something that you'll never see.” He was still talking the talk in 1985, when he told Spin's Scott Cohen, 'I've never been able to understand the seriousness of pride. People talk, act, live as if they're never gonna die. And what do they leave behind – nothing but a mask.” Aiming to depict “pride before the fall” in all its venality, Dylan draws from the full span of history, finding an Old Testament parallel to every modern folly. Just as omnipresent as the one true messiah is the Antichrist, recast as:

“a retired businessman named Red / Cast down from heaven and he's out of his head.”

The clock is ticking.

Whether the song ever really “had a bunch of extra verses” – as Dylan suggested to Elliott Mintz – only the other 43 takes are likely to reveal. There are more than enough words herein. On the released take he somehow manages to deliver one of his most convoluted lyrics without tripping himself up, though he conies damn close in verse four with:

“How to enter into the gates of paradise; and know / How to carry a burden too heavy to be yours”,

briefly choking on “and know”. (This couplet is rendered nonsensical in the 2004 Lyrics, becoming, “paradise / No, how to carry,” Que?)

Foot Of Pride elucidated a feeling he sometimes struggled to articulate on lesser Infidels cuts. Placed last on an album, it would have left no one in any doubt that he remained appalled by man's inhumanity to man. But at the last minute the song was pulled. Was this a simple failure of nerve? Dylan claimed not, telling Mintz in 1991: “The reason why it was never used was because the tempo speeded up for some vague and curious reason.” Hardly the most convincing of explanations, especially when this was a song he cut nore times than any other in his studio career to date. The tape logs reveal he did 44 takes of the song, across six sessions, of which the sessions on 22, 23 and 25 April 1983 were devoted largely or entirely to this single song.

Having tried the song every which way, including (unbelievably) a bossa nova version – as well as the inevitable reggaefied rendition – one and all failed to satisfy. Even after three solid days working on the song he refused to give up on it. At the next two sessions (26 and 28 April 1983), he tried to put his foot down and, even on 29 April 1983, with the end nigh, he tried one last version at night's end. But even after 43 goes at it, the thing still broke down. The song was finally copyrighted on 1983 “Album Compilation #2”, around 1 May 1983; from the very same version that made the first album sequence (and, eventually, The Bootleg Series). So Dylan did succeed in picking a version out; one in which the tempo – and the message – never deviated.

The version in the 2004 Lyrics is again full of badly mis-transcribed lines. “You'll Love Me Till The Morning, Stranger” comes out as “ya love me to the moon and the stranger”; and instead of “sleeping with your head face down in the plate” one gets “your head face down in a grave”. Even more bizarre, the last word of the line “They can exult you up or bring you down bankrupt” is given as “main route”. See me after class, Ludwig.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun October 16th, 2011, 13:31 GMT 
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Lou Reed:

"That's the song I picked to do at Bobfest [in New York in 1992]. I'd been listening to it almost every day for two months. It's so phucking funny: 'Did he make it to the top? Well, he probably did and dropped.' There are so many verses, it was impossible to learn. G.E. Smith, who was playing with me, turned the pages. There is a lot of anger here. It's not the Three Stooges."


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sat November 9th, 2013, 23:50 GMT 
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Great, great song. Unbelievable that it was not on Infidels. It's one of his finest.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 09:55 GMT 

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It's in my top 10, that's for sure.

"Up on the stage they're tryin' to get water out of rocks!"


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 11:55 GMT 
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I never understood the reverence for this song. It strikes me as melodically boring (unlike the stand-out Infidels' era material) and lyrically clunky. I like 'Lord Protect My Child' a lot more than this one.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 15:51 GMT 
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Lady Medusa wrote:
Lou Reed:"There are so many verses, it was impossible to learn. G.E. Smith, who was playing with me, turned the pages."
Painful to watch. You don't expect anyone to memorize something like that. But if you still can't do it without getting lost, aw, just get it outta here, start over


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 15:56 GMT 
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panther wrote:
I never understood the reverence for this song. It strikes me as melodically boring (unlike the stand-out Infidels' era material) and lyrically clunky. I like 'Lord Protect My Child' a lot more than this one.
It's one of those litmus tests for people who get off on long one-chord settings for complex lyrical structures. Actually there'd be a lot more stuff written just as poetry that could be worked into a lyric if people liked this kind of song more.
Reminds me of being 15 picking up the needle on Highway 61 over and over trying to transcribe the lyrics, trying to create a structure for this flood of lines


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 19:12 GMT 

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A stupendously cranky lyric with Dylan in full-bore Jeremiad mode, delivered with all of Dylan's inimitable mastery of rhythm and metre - classic stuff from him - but bolted to an utterly uninteresting musical backdrop. I suspect that's why the song never went anywhere, he lacked the willpower to work up something better for it musically and knew he couldn't top that vocal performance: a recipe for losing interest.

But in terms of lyric and vocal, I see nothing to dislike here. Visionary, splenetic, slightly insane, they've got everything you could ask for from Bob in this period. Yet another lost track from the master.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 21:28 GMT 

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AndoDoug wrote:
Lady Medusa wrote:
Lou Reed:"There are so many verses, it was impossible to learn. G.E. Smith, who was playing with me, turned the pages."
Painful to watch. You don't expect anyone to memorize something like that. But if you still can't do it without getting lost, aw, just get it outta here, start over

I don't think Lou was getting lost. That sort of stuttering, out-of-sync-with-the-backing feel was just part of what he went for in his performing style. Check out what he did with Lennon's JEALOUS GUY: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjTvFx_zgUo


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 21:52 GMT 
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I never heard of this song before. It is great.
would love to hear Dylan sing it.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 21:57 GMT 
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The Mighty Monkey Of Mim wrote:
Lady Medusa wrote:
Lou Reed:"There are so many verses, it was impossible to learn. G.E. Smith, who was playing with me, turned the pages."

AndoDoug wrote:
Painful to watch. You don't expect anyone to memorize something like that. But if you still can't do it without getting lost, aw, just get it outta here, start over

I don't think Lou was getting lost. That sort of stuttering, out-of-sync-with-the-backing feel was just part of what he went for in his performing style. Check out what he did with Lennon's JEALOUS GUY: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjTvFx_zgUo


agreed. I don't get the spam-hate for this performance. trash Mellencamp's Like a Rolling Stone if you want to trash something from that concert. Lou Reed's delivery was impeccable.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 22:32 GMT 
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The Mighty Monkey Of Mim wrote:
I don't think Lou was getting lost. That sort of stuttering, out-of-sync-with-the-backing feel was just part of what he went for in his performing style. Check out what he did with Lennon's JEALOUS GUY: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjTvFx_zgUo


Oh wow, so good! Thanks for the link. Lou Reed RIP


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sun November 10th, 2013, 23:09 GMT 
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Alouette wrote:
I never heard of this song before. It is great.
would love to hear Dylan sing it.



You must hear it!

http://grooveshark.com/#!/search/song?q ... t+Of+Pride


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Mon November 11th, 2013, 04:36 GMT 
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raging_glory wrote:
Alouette wrote:
I never heard of this song before. It is great.
would love to hear Dylan sing it.



You must hear it!

http://grooveshark.com/#!/search/song?q ... t+Of+Pride


thank you


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Mon November 11th, 2013, 05:29 GMT 

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a favorite of mine and lou rocks it well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovDZ-g0CjHo


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Mon November 11th, 2013, 05:38 GMT 

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raging_glory wrote:
You must hear it!
great song


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Mon November 11th, 2013, 16:15 GMT 

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I can't remember where I read this, but supposedly there were 20+ versions recorded during the sessions. Maybe as with Red River Shore, they tried it every possible way but Bob just wasn't happy with any of them, despite knowing it was a tremendous song.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Mon November 11th, 2013, 17:16 GMT 
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AngelWithFourFaces wrote:
I can't remember where I read this, but supposedly there were 20+ versions recorded during the sessions. Maybe as with Red River Shore, they tried it every possible way but Bob just wasn't happy with any of them, despite knowing it was a tremendous song.


http://bjorner.com/DSN06920%20-%201983% ... m#DSN06932

It was recorded very, very many times according to Bjorner, but this is the one session with only Foot Of Pride. I'd like to hear the "reggae" version.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Fri September 12th, 2014, 19:47 GMT 

Joined: Thu September 20th, 2012, 23:49 GMT
Posts: 87
Lou Reed's performance inspired me to revisit the Infidels outtake.

I used the free audio software Audacity to compensate the speed up by the band, using the "Sliding Time Scale" effect.

My tweaked version starts 5% faster and ends 5% slower than the original (flawed) recording.
Sounds great !


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Fri September 12th, 2014, 22:48 GMT 
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Location: Where the swift don't win the race
raging_glory wrote:
Great, great song. Unbelievable that it was not on Infidels. It's one of his finest.

Infidels should have been a double album, Bob certainly had the songs for it.

This performance by Lou Reed is better than the outtake I have. I would love to see Bob do it now. I think his band and his vocal prowess would blow the roof off the auditorium with a song like this.


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sat September 13th, 2014, 00:38 GMT 
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great song !

"say one more stupid thing to me, before the final nail is driven in"

8)


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 Post subject: Re: Foot of Pride
PostPosted: Sat September 13th, 2014, 10:28 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 5th, 2006, 18:41 GMT
Posts: 2008
I love me some self-righteous, ranting Dylan, but I rate this one below "Caribbean Wind" and way, way below "Blind Willie McTell" in terms of his lost 80's songs. The production and music on it are average at best. A stripped version of this song, with minimal backing, would have served both the lyrics and the vocals better. Interesting, but flawed, composition. I can see why Dylan was never completely satisfied with it. There's definitely a good or even a great song somewhere in "Foot of Pride," but we're never going to hear it unless Dylan messed around with it privately and we just aren't aware of the existence of that tape. Still, proof that Dylan was sparked by a weird muse in the early 80's and was writing good stuff (unlike in the mid-to-late 80's, when hahahaha), even if he ultimately couldn't get his visions to completely coalesce.


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