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 Post subject: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Thu October 11th, 2018, 17:57 GMT 
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Joined: Fri April 29th, 2016, 01:44 GMT
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Has anyone ever noticed this? The copy I listen to is one of the CD reissues of Highway 61 Revisited and I also remember it on this album https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Best_of_Bob_Dylan

But what I am asking about people noticing occurs in the second verse

People'd call, say "Beware doll, you're
Bound to fall"
You thought they were all kiddin' you

So as he sings "Call say beware doll" it begins transition into just the left side of the mixing and the phrase "bound to fall" is completely on the left side and then it goes back to normal for the rest of the song. Was this on the original mix and or why did they mix it so strange at this single point in the song?


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Thu October 11th, 2018, 20:38 GMT 
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This used to drive me nuts. I've always assumed someone accidentally turned the pan pot on Dylans vocal channel when it was being recorded/summed. Due to the nature of the 4 track recorders they were using, it would be next to impossible to fix once it was recorded onto a new track with other instruments.


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Thu October 11th, 2018, 20:49 GMT 

Joined: Sat July 19th, 2008, 14:51 GMT
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It's detail like this that keeps me coming back here. Just sayin'.


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Fri October 12th, 2018, 07:09 GMT 
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From "Electric Dylan" by Roger Ford:

http://www.electricdylan.net/index.html

"Many stereo issues of the album (including all CD releases) display a sonic fault in the first verse of this song: as Dylan sings . . . bound to fall, you thought . . ., his voice shifts towards to the right hand side and back to the centre. According to engineer Steve Hoffman, who remastered the album for the DCC gold CD, It's just a drop-out on the original tape. Some Columbia tape copies don't have this drop out; they were made before the dropout occurred due to tape wear. Some tape copies do have this drop-out; they were made after the drop-out occurred." *)

*) Roger took this quotation from a post to the Music Forum on Steve Hoffman's own web site, www.stevehoffman.tv. The thread is no longer accessible.


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Fri October 12th, 2018, 07:17 GMT 

Joined: Wed December 13th, 2006, 13:48 GMT
Posts: 29
Bob briefly turned away from the mike (possibly while reading from the written lyrics in front of him). A similar occurrance can also be heard on the studio version of All Along The Watchtower.


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Fri October 12th, 2018, 11:33 GMT 
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Brickbat wrote:
Bob briefly turned away from the mike (possibly while reading from the written lyrics in front of him). A similar occurrance can also be heard on the studio version of All Along The Watchtower.


But you can't hear this fault on the vinyl issue.


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Sat October 13th, 2018, 07:25 GMT 
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Bit off topic here, sorry, but I was quite surprised when I heard the takes of LARS on the 16 CD blue box set, instrument by instrument of the master take.

The song as a whole as it´s on the record sounds so glorious, but then when hearing each instrument isolated, you hear so many mistakes that you are quite shocked it can later all sound so well


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Sat October 13th, 2018, 09:30 GMT 

Joined: Tue January 6th, 2015, 15:03 GMT
Posts: 611
wormington wrote:
Bit off topic here, sorry, but I was quite surprised when I heard the takes of LARS on the 16 CD blue box set, instrument by instrument of the master take.

The song as a whole as it´s on the record sounds so glorious, but then when hearing each instrument isolated, you hear so many mistakes that you are quite shocked it can later all sound so well
I do a bit of home songwriting and multitrack recording, and all the books, websites, blogs, YT vids, etc. emphasise getting the playing right, and insisting that you should never think you can 'fix it in the mix'. But so many of my favourite records (particularly from the 1960s) are positively riddled with mistakes - on The Beatles' "Please Please Me", John Lennon sings different words to McCartney on one of the verses. He immediately prepared to do a re-take, but George Martin said "No, it doesn't matter - that's a number one record". And he was right. There are countless other examples. It's all about feel.


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Sun October 14th, 2018, 00:14 GMT 
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Normally mistakes in the songs add way more to the final product than a perfect mix but I always feel like they let Jimi Hendrix mix the opening of the song


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Sun October 14th, 2018, 04:48 GMT 
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I don't think a tape drop out is very often the kind of mistake that improves the whole.


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Sun October 14th, 2018, 09:07 GMT 

Joined: Tue January 6th, 2015, 15:03 GMT
Posts: 611
smoke wrote:
I don't think a tape drop out is very often the kind of mistake that improves the whole.
Not in itself, no. What I was suggesting was that they don't really matter in the grand scheme of things; and an obsession with getting everything spot-on can lead to too much time spent on a recording - anathema to spontaneous first-takers like Dylan and Neil Young.


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 Post subject: Re: LARS mixing question
PostPosted: Mon October 15th, 2018, 04:18 GMT 
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smoke wrote:
I don't think a tape drop out is very often the kind of mistake that improves the whole.

to be clear I was not saying it was


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