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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 01:11 GMT 
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I really like this album, Its different, but great on its own. I actually got it because I heard another artist cover Country Pie, and then I saw it as a track on this album, and I like the original even better. I loves me come Country Pie.


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 01:39 GMT 
Since I seen this thread I have listened to Nashville Skyline four or five times, just to reaquaint myself to it.
I once had a girlfriend that absolutely adored this albumn, she listened to it constantly.
She said she loved the tenderness in his voice.
I like his voice and some of the songs but the albumn, as a whole, doesn't do much for me.
I may be alone in this, but I think Self Portrait is at least ten times better. I laugh my ass off everytime I hear Self Portrait. I just 'get' that albumn. It is like a good joke. A great big -put on-.
But anyway, the best song on Nashville is One more Night, there is a mystical force about that song that I could live forever in.
I laugh whenever I see that cover shot. Dylan looking down on everyone saying "Howdy, here is where my head is at, how about you?"


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 04:59 GMT 
I like this album. Its got an indescribable charm about it.
Great way to cap off the decade.
Not the best and certainly not the worst.

8/10
Favorite: I Threw it all away
Least Favorite: Peggy Day but I still like it.

best line: once I had mountains in the palm of my hand
and rivers that ran through every day.


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 13:22 GMT 
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Who dares break it to the ER Bob-harem that "Country Pie" is a euphemism for "pu$$y"? And that the first syllable of the first word of the title says it all, really?

Of academic interest is the corresponding line from "Thunder on the Mountain":

I got the pork chops, she got the pie

Hasn't changed much over the years, has he?

EDIT: It's rarely that one finds occasion to mention Bob Dylan and Johnny Rotten in the same sentence, but Mr Rotten pulls exactly the same stunt as Mr Dylan in his delivery of the second syllable of the second word of the Sex Pistols' "Pretty Vacant".


Last edited by Eddie on Wed March 28th, 2007, 13:15 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 14:15 GMT 
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John Cooper Clarke is even more explicit in 'Twat' when he asks who put the you-know-what in Scunthorpe.


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 14:34 GMT 

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I have trouble convincing some friends Lay Lady Lay is Dylan singing when it pops up on the radio, which is a lot. They are used to HW61 or Blonde On Blonde albums, It's funny but can be annoying when they wont belive it :roll:


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 22:30 GMT 

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I know a chappy who claims this is Dylan's finest album. I once witnessed him listen to the album on repeat for the better part of a day. He claimed the album was the equal of Verdi's best works.


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 22:41 GMT 
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I liked Nashville Skyline when I first bought it... although found it a little embarrassing... I bought it in the very early '80s and was just a 'right on' rock fan... as a teenager 'country music' meant very little to me... however, over the years, I've grown to love the album... it's one that captures both the simplicity and complexity of 'life'... it's a glorious album.

As an aside... I have meant to say, many times in the past, what a great 'series' this is that Mr. Tambourine Man is putting together... I kept forgetting, so will now say "thank you and well done Mr. TM"... each installment to the series has been superb... hey, I can't wait until you do a series on your own songs either.


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PostPosted: Wed March 28th, 2007, 01:35 GMT 

Joined: Sat November 4th, 2006, 00:48 GMT
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Location: Ontario
rhonenket wrote:
But anyway, the best song on Nashville is One more Night, there is a mystical force about that song that I could live forever in.

Yeah that might be the one I like most as well. My favourite lines on the whole album are

I will turn my head up high
To that dark and rolling sky,
For tonight no light will shine on me


I don't know why, but that 'dark and rolling sky' part does it for me every time. So vivid. I never miss a chance to show off my voice when that comes around.


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PostPosted: Wed March 28th, 2007, 13:24 GMT 
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LittleFishes wrote:
Country Pie


...and, as for:

Slap that drummer with a pie that smells
(Yea! Heavy and a Bottle of Bread)

...let's not even go there.


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PostPosted: Wed March 28th, 2007, 18:54 GMT 
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Girl from the north country is ok but i just wished Bob and Johnny would have worked it a bit more before recording it. they kinda screwed it up... :P


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PostPosted: Thu March 29th, 2007, 17:40 GMT 
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It's the only time he smiles for an album front cover, correct?

It's ironic that he helped set in chain the cultural ferment that would develop and spill over into political anarchy/student riots in the U.S., England, France and Germany in the late 1960's, yet be beaming this beatific 'colourific' smile and tipping his hat out of that album cover. A cultural pseud with more gas in the tank than me might argue that this was the deliberately mischievous act of the one that had opened up Pandora's Box then climbed back into it and shut the lid once he knew it was empty.


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PostPosted: Thu March 29th, 2007, 18:20 GMT 
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This album is maybe the best example in Bob's catalogue of a great artist making merely good music. It's good all the way through, and sounds like a homage to heroes and a style that Bob loves deeply but had not yet mastered. He's leaning on the great session players more than in the past, and playing it safe with song composition by relying on models derived from other artists without adding his by then characteristic verbal flair. This is a risky and challenging austerity, even more severe than John Wesley Harding which still had very strong imagery and narrative concision and surprise supported by minimalist folk/rock.

Nashville Skyline is musically richer, lyrically simpler and less powerful, and sung with less authority than any prior Dylan album. The opening duet serves as a musical genuflection to Bob's heroes and mentors. Cash's vocal on the second verse seems to spur Bob into looking for fresh phrasing, which is admirable even if he comes up with something mannered. The song also suffers from excising a verse. The "harmonizing" is more charming than musically competent.

Nashville Skyline Rag further subverts the notion of a Bob Dylan album, eliminating words entirely and relying on the pedal steel and dobro breaks after the harmonica opening. Nice flatpicking follows the dobro--could this be Bob? Great piano break, and Buttrey is a perfect drummer for this music. The harmonica playing is the weakest link in the song.

"Is it rolling, Bob?" has to be one of the funniest moments in Bob's career, and To Be Alone With You signals the beginning of the "Bob Dylan" album with an original song featuring Dylan in a musical format not too distant from the Hawks or the Basement tapes, but it is played a bit sloppy--a precursor of Self-Portrait and too many other Dylan albums. The song is a standard country format with a bridge that uses the IV chord and the II chord just like Hank Snow, but the tempo straddles country and rock without really doing either genre justice. It's closer to rock than country, so the music feels a little at odds with the lyrics and compositional structure. This song has had some rollicking concert versions in recent years.

I Threw It All Away is both a simple love song and a comment on his own career in some sense.

Peggy Day sounds like the band has hit its stride. The song really swings, nice dobro and pedal steel, very relaxed singing, effective finale.

Lay Lady Lay is pretty much perfectly realized, a gem that stands up very well after all these years. Great pedal steel/organ arrangement.

One More Night is another song in standard country format. Bob Johnston and the engineers did a great job on this album--the acoustic instruments always shine in the mix and support the vocal. Another fine dobro break. Great bass playing. Nice piano flourish at the very end.

Tell Me That It Isn't True is maybe the best composed song and in its own modest way approaches greatness. The organ and piano are minimal and very effective in supporting the vocal. I wonder if the acoustic lead guitar is Bob. Another well-arranged finale.

Country Pie has no pretensions, plenty of humor, a very strong vocal, a great guitar lead. Maybe the closest to a Basement Tapes song on the album. And waiting 20 plus years to hear Charlie Sexton rip through this song in concert was well worth it.

Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You is a perfect last song for the album, very well sung by Bob who wisely puts some extra bars of vocal rest that allow what he sings to ring true. It's also a kind of coda directed to his audience expressing some level of confidence that long after he is gone, the song and album will remain close to listeners' hearts. Another swell pedal steel break. Listen for the acoustic guitar and piano fills behind the vocal, and the acoustic guitar solo that ends the song.

I wrote this as I listened. I did not hear a single weak moment in the album. I did not hear any transcendantly visionary ego-destroying moments either. I did hear a great singer and songwriter taking the time to remind himself of music greater than his own and paying homage to some of his inspirational sources--Hank Snow, Johnny Cash and Hank Williams in particular.


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PostPosted: Thu March 29th, 2007, 18:25 GMT 
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harmonica albert wrote:
This album is maybe the best example in Bob's catalogue of a great artist making merely good music. It's good all the way through, and sounds like a homage to heroes and a style that Bob loves deeply but had not yet mastered. He's leaning on the great session players more than in the past, and playing it safe with song composition by relying on models derived from other artists without adding his by then characteristic verbal flair. This is a risky and challenging austerity, even more severe than John Wesley Harding which still had very strong imagery and narrative concision and surprise supported by minimalist folk/rock.

Nashville Skyline is musically richer, lyrically simpler and less powerful, and sung with less authority than any prior Dylan album. The opening duet serves as a musical genuflection to Bob's heroes and mentors. Cash's vocal on the second verse seems to spur Bob into looking for fresh phrasing, which is admirable even if he comes up with something mannered. The song also suffers from excising a verse. The "harmonizing" is more charming than musically competent.

Nashville Skyline Rag further subverts the notion of a Bob Dylan album, eliminating words entirely and relying on the pedal steel and dobro breaks after the harmonica opening. Nice flatpicking follows the dobro--could this be Bob? Great piano break, and Buttrey is a perfect drummer for this music. The harmonica playing is the weakest link in the song.

"Is it rolling, Bob?" has to be one of the funniest moments in Bob's career, and To Be Alone With You signals the beginning of the "Bob Dylan" album with an original song featuring Dylan in a musical format not too distant from the Hawks or the Basement tapes, but it is played a bit sloppy--a precursor of Self-Portrait and too many other Dylan albums. The song is a standard country format with a bridge that uses the IV chord and the II chord just like Hank Snow, but the tempo straddles country and rock without really doing either genre justice. It's closer to rock than country, so the music feels a little at odds with the lyrics and compositional structure. This song has had some rollicking concert versions in recent years.

I Threw It All Away is both a simple love song and a comment on his own career in some sense.

Peggy Day sounds like the band has hit its stride. The song really swings, nice dobro and pedal steel, very relaxed singing, effective finale.

Lay Lady Lay is pretty much perfectly realized, a gem that stands up very well after all these years. Great pedal steel/organ arrangement.

One More Night is another song in standard country format. Bob Johnston and the engineers did a great job on this album--the acoustic instruments always shine in the mix and support the vocal. Another fine dobro break. Great bass playing. Nice piano flourish at the very end.

Tell Me That It Isn't True is maybe the best composed song and in its own modest way approaches greatness. The organ and piano are minimal and very effective in supporting the vocal. I wonder if the acoustic lead guitar is Bob. Another well-arranged finale.

Country Pie has no pretensions, plenty of humor, a very strong vocal, a great guitar lead. Maybe the closest to a Basement Tapes song on the album. And waiting 20 plus years to hear Charlie Sexton rip through this song in concert was well worth it.

Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You is a perfect last song for the album, very well sung by Bob who wisely puts some extra bars of vocal rest that allow what he sings to ring true. It's also a kind of coda directed to his audience expressing some level of confidence that long after he is gone, the song and album will remain close to listeners' hearts. Another swell pedal steel break. Listen for the acoustic guitar and piano fills behind the vocal, and the acoustic guitar solo that ends the song.

I wrote this as I listened. I did not hear a single weak moment in the album. I did not hear any transcendantly visionary ego-destroying moments either. I did hear a great singer and songwriter taking the time to remind himself of music greater than his own and paying homage to some of his inspirational sources--Hank Snow, Johnny Cash and Hank Williams in particular.



Great review, nice to see you're still around these parts.


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PostPosted: Sat March 31st, 2007, 00:28 GMT 
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Hate to admit it, but this one has never quite grown on me. I like the duet with Cash, but overall every time I try to listen to this album I end up losing interest. It never sounds bad, just sort of boring. Oh well.


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PostPosted: Sat March 31st, 2007, 03:48 GMT 
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I rate this just above Empire Burlesque, Down in the Groove, Saved, etc.


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PostPosted: Sat March 31st, 2007, 09:02 GMT 
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Actually I think that the backing is better than Dylan's singing to the extent that I find the instrumental to be the best cut on the album.


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PostPosted: Sat March 31st, 2007, 18:28 GMT 
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I like this album!
The cover is friendly and the sounds of Dylan are comfortable!


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PostPosted: Sun April 1st, 2007, 01:12 GMT 

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"sounds of Dylan are comfortable." I guess that's a pretty good way to put it.


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PostPosted: Sun April 1st, 2007, 12:40 GMT 
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I think this is an album that wouldn't even be known if it wasn't by Dylan.

Not to say that it's bad, but it's not good either.

It's just an album which sounds pretty much the same the whole way through, with little to make it stand out.

I think the version of Girl From The North Country is listenable but far inferior from the original.

'Lay Lady Lay' is good, as is 'Tonight, I'll Be Staying Here With You', although the version on Live 1975 is a hundred times better. In fact I'd go as far to say that the version on Live 1975 is the best live performance by Dylan I've ever heard, even beating the classics on Live 1966.

But the album also has it's boring moments - Tell Me That It Isn't True? Country Pie? Yawn.


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PostPosted: Sun April 1st, 2007, 14:31 GMT 
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It's very different from other albums of Dylan,but it's good.


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PostPosted: Sun April 1st, 2007, 16:12 GMT 

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There are a few gems on this album -- "Lay Lady Lay" is just about perfect, and "I Threw It All Away" and "Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You" are also very good. "To Be Alone With You" is nice but very short, and the Cash duet on "Girl From the North Country" is oddly compelling but their voices just don't seem to mesh.

The rest of the album is pretty pedestrian to me. And considering the whole thing is only about a half hour long, you'd hope that the good-to-ordinary ratio would be a little higher.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2007, 10:33 GMT 
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this was the first dylan album my younger brother owned. i think it put his fandom back a good two years ;)

i love it, of course. would put it at about #5 if i was ranking. this one hit me thematicaly when i was going through issues with my then boyfriend, so it was an important record for me.

favourite track- i threw it all away

i prefer this version of north country to the original, also.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2007, 17:37 GMT 

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Location: Gothenburg.
I had a girlfriend... My first true love, I might say. It's over now, but it was great while it lasted. When we first met, I travelled 120 swedish miles just to spend five days with her. It was the greatest days of my life. On the last day, we stumbled into a recordshop. I felt the urge to buy her an album that she should remember me for. A great album, one that she would like and that I liked. A romantic, but still not too cheesy... Of course, I bought "Nashville Skyline". She loved it. I'm convinced that it was the album that made us move in togheter two months later.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2007, 18:47 GMT 
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Thank You for posting that nice sweet loveleee bob photo for all of us to seeeeeeeeeee


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