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PostPosted: Wed July 10th, 2013, 23:49 GMT 
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A m e r i c a n a r a m A

Bob Dylan and His Band

-Tony Garnier - bass
-George Recile - drums
-Stu Kimball - acoustic rhythm guitar
-Charlie Sexton - lead guitar
-Donnie Herron - banjo, electric mandolin, pedal steel, lap steel


also featuring:
Richard Thompson Electric Trio, Wilco & My Morning Jacket

Peoria, Illinois
moved to Peoria Civic Center
11 July 2013, Thursday



Capacity: 11,442
Showtime: 5:30 pm
Ticket Price: $39.50 - $65.50



This is the 34th Show of the 2013 Never Ending Tour

Previously:
Duke debut - Spring tour leg = 23
A m e r i c a n a r a m A = 10
____
2013 shows prior to this = 33



Moved from an OUTDOOR Baseball Field to an INDOOR Basketball Court...
...oh well, it won't stop the fun!


---
From: http://blogs.pjstar.com/thebuzz/2013/07 ... ic-center/

Seating details released for Americanarama show at Civic Center

Peoria, Illinois, USA - The Peoria Civic Center this morning has released more info about the July 11 Americanarama concert featuring Bob Dylan, Wilco, My Morning Jacket and the Richard Thompson Electric Trio.

Officials announced last week that the show is being moved from Dozer Park to the Civic Center Arena. Doors open at 4:30 p.m., and the concert starts at 5:30 p.m. The show is expected to last until around 11 p.m.

Customers who bought tickets at the $65.50 level will have access to the floor of the arena (which is standing room only) and lower bowl seating on a first come, first served basis. Those who wish to access the floor area will receive a specific wristband at the arena entrance.

Customers who purchased tickets at the $39.50 price level will be directed to specific sections in the upper bowl.

VIP ticketholders will receive entry five minutes before the doors open to other ticketholders. All VIP ticketholders must go to the Civic Center box office before entering the arena to receive a wristband that gives them early access.

Those who wish to obtain a refund because of the venue change can do so before 11:59 a.m. on Thursday, July 11, at the Dozer Park box office, 730 SW Jefferson, Peoria.


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PostPosted: Wed July 10th, 2013, 23:55 GMT 
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We'll be there, looking forward to all the acts..first time seeing MMJ and Richard Thompson, my third Wilco show and lucky number 16 for Dylan.

I'll plan to report in if anything changes in the set.


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PostPosted: Wed July 10th, 2013, 23:56 GMT 
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muleskinner_blues wrote:
We'll be there, looking forward to all the acts..first time seeing MMJ and Richard Thompson, my third Wilco show and lucky number 16 for Dylan.

I'll plan to report in if anything changes in the set.

Good mornin' Captain, we really appreciate you telling us about what you observe. Thanks!


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 03:03 GMT 

Joined: Thu December 21st, 2006, 16:44 GMT
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Location: Illinois
I didn't know you were from around here, muleskinner. I'll be there as well. I haven't seen Dylan from since '07--given the good things I've heard about this year, I'm really looking forward to it.


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 03:11 GMT 
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i'll be around here at 3 pm, then I'm paddling over to the show

A Merry Llama wrote:
Jumping ahead to TOMORROW , the venue may have changed, but this brewery remains:

http://www.rhodells.com

should have time to drop by around 3 on the dot...

Image


now, i'm going to do some research on Peoria...


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 04:06 GMT 
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Will it Play in Peoria?

Not if you mean playing ball - we are not at the ball park, and not in the theater, but in the arena of this fair place, under the guidance of unfair people. blah. salty way to start the evening, but the TRAIN will prevail.

Dave Matthews Almanac says this:


No current records of any gigs at this Venue

Image

cool on the outside

Image

not so hot on the inside,

and I've had my fill of hockey and the color red this week here in Chicago,
thank you very much. better not get any more of that down there.

But I'm not bitter, Peoria will prevail. I know there's a charming graveyard, or Civil War memorial, or divey bar that will get me to the place I need to be to enjoy AmericamaramA, like every good American Llama should do.

Did You Know?
The phrase "Will It Play in Peoria?", popularized by movies with Groucho Marx, originated in the early '20s and '30s during the US vaudeville era. At that time, Peoria was one of the country's most important stops for vaudeville acts and if an act did well in Peoria, vaudeville companies knew that it would work throughout the nation.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tecsFnMBikU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3H2DPh_NmA

Hippodrome was a home to vaudeville in Peoria; served as the Rialto Theater from 1931 to 1979
The old Hippodrome was something to see in Downtown Peoria. Built in 1913, the theater could accommodate 1,674 people and featured an interior and exterior that would definitely qualify as ornate. There was also an escalator in the early days that could whisk you all the way to the balcony. This was a vaudeville house built (sturdily) to support live shows such as the Powers Elephants, “The New York Hippodrome sensation,” one of the first week’s opening acts.
In 1931, the place was renamed the Rialto Theater and played movies up until 1979 when the old theate had to make way for the Peoria Civic Center. Architect Les Kenyon, a preservation advocate, argued at the time that the Civic Center should have made use of the old vaudeville theater instead of tearing it down. After all, no sooner had the dust settled from the Rialto’s demolition than a new theater went up in its place. Kenyon made the point that architectural plans could have been altered to accommodate the old theater, placing the Civic Center’s arena and exhibit hall around it. As for a “modern look,” the exterior skin of the Rialto could have been replaced to match the new buildings, said Kenyon.
Longtime Peorians will remember the long lines that attended the showing of “Star Wars” at the Rialto in 1977.
For an inside view of the building, see some of the photos taken by Howard Goldbaum, a former Bradley University professor, that are posted on Facebook.

Image

http://blogs.pjstar.com/mindingbiz/2013 ... 1-to-1979/

yet another river town it seems:

Image

and a final reminder - it's not here:

Image


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 12:29 GMT 
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ain't_talkin' wrote:
I didn't know you were from around here, muleskinner. I'll be there as well. I haven't seen Dylan from since '07--given the good things I've heard about this year, I'm really looking forward to it.


Ya we're a few hours away but my brother lives in Peoria so we're making the drive over. Would normally like to be up front but I'm sick of fighting GA crowds and I think my wife would agree so I think we'll just hang around wherever is comfortable, hope that's not too bad of a view!

If you haven't seen him in that long, you'll love it, I think. I saw two shows in the Spring and it's a much more interesting show then it was in '07, maybe not in setlist surprises here lately but with the piano and center stage, etc. He was singing very well (by 2013 Dylan standards, that is) in the Spring, so I'll be curious to see how he is now after a few months and with Charlie back in the sound.


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 12:31 GMT 
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Still Go Barefoot wrote:
muleskinner_blues wrote:
We'll be there, looking forward to all the acts..first time seeing MMJ and Richard Thompson, my third Wilco show and lucky number 16 for Dylan.

I'll plan to report in if anything changes in the set.

Good mornin' Captain, we really appreciate you telling us about what you observe. Thanks!


Good deal, I should be able to assuming I can get reception and get on here. Hopefully we have something interesting to report!


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 14:04 GMT 
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I'll be at this show too. It will be my first time seeing RT. My first full MMJ show (I've seen partial shows at Bonnaroo in 08 & 11) and my 3rd time seeing Wilco. It will be my 8th Dylan show. I'm camping at Jubilee College State Park with my folks and they are going to drop me off at the civic center sometime between 3:30 & 4. I'm not sure yet if I want to try for the rail or just get a comfortable seat in the lower bowl. I guess it will depend on how many people are in line when I get there. I'm hoping for a good show tonight and my first Hard Rain.


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 14:40 GMT 

Joined: Wed January 28th, 2009, 17:55 GMT
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My buddy just talked to Stu inside the hotel next door. The tour buses are around back. Does Bob usually stay at the same places as the band?


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 17:14 GMT 
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things to try to fit in today or tommorow AM

http://www.peoriahistoricalsociety.org/ ... aspx?ID=18

Grandview Drive
Peoria’s premier scenic drive
dubbed the
"World’s Most Beautiful Drive"
by President Theodore Roosevelt

&

Springdale Cemetery
The oldest chartered cemetery
in the state of Illinois


While winding along Grandview Drive, view the elegant homes of past and present, prosperous merchants, landowners, and professionals. See the Illinois River from the best vantage point in Peoria. The next segment of the tour is Springdale Cemetery, which is the oldest chartered cemetery in the state of Illinois. Hervey Lightner designed this 270-acre tree-studded cemetery with miles of twisting roads in 1855. You will appreciate the serene park-like setting and hear about the founding fathers and mothers of Peoria. A must see!

Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War Tour

Lincoln in Peoria
Learn about
Camp Peoria & Camp Lyon

Hear stories of
Central Illinois Civil War veterans
&
the GAR Hall

http://www.peoriahistoricalsociety.org/ ... aspx?ID=20

This tour tells the story of Lincoln’s visits to Peoria, the Civil War troops, and the camps where they trained. See the markers where the camps once stood. Visit Springdale Cemetery and see the final resting place of many of the Civil War veterans. Pay a short visit to the GAR Hall, built in 1909, and hear the story of Joseph Greenhut, one of the Whiskey Barons who provided much of the funding for the Hall.

Image

http://www.peorian.com/news/1335-breaki ... y-for-2013

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sw7GUwA ... dded#at=23


The Native Americans:

Archaeologists can trace early man in Peoria as far back as 10,000 B.C.E. Artifacts and burial mounds yield evidence of a Native American civilization that was highly organized, ritualistic, and in harmony with nature. By 1650, the Illini Indians, a part of the Algonquin Nation, populated the area. The major tribes of the Illinois Confederacy were the Peoria, Kaskaskia, Michigamea, Cahokia, and Tamaroa.

The Peoria (through French Peouarea, from Peoria Piwarea, 'he comes carrying a pack on his back': a personal name) were one of the principal tribes of the Illinois confederacy. Franquelin, in his map of 1688, locates them and the Tapouaro on a river west of the Mississippi above the mouth of Wisconsin River, probably the upper Iowa River. Early references to the Illinois, which place them on the Mississippi, although some of the tribes were on the Rock and Illinois rivers, must relate to the Peoria and locate them near the mouth of the Wisconsin River. When Marquette and Joliet descended the Mississippi in 1673, they found them and the Moingwena on the west side of the Mississippi, near the mouth of a river supposed to be the Des Moines, though it may have been one farther north. When Marquette returned from the south, he found that the Peoria had removed and were near the lower end of the expansion of the Illinois River, near presentday Peoria. At the close of the war carried on by the Sauk and Foxes and other northern tribes against the Illinois, about 1768, the Kickapoo took possession of this village and made it their principal settlement.

About the same time, a large part of the Peoria crossed over into Missouri, where they remained, building their village on Blackwater fork, until they removed to Kansas. One band, the Utagami, living near the Illinois River, was practically exterminated, probably by the northern tribes, during the Revolutionary War. Utagami, according to Dr. William Jones, may mean the Foxes, who were known to the northern Algonquians as Utugamig, "people of the other shore." The Foxes claim to have annihilated the Peoria for the help they gave the French and other tribes in the wars against them (the Foxes). The main body of the Peoria remained on the east bank of the Illinois River until 1832, when, along with the other tribes of the old Illinois Confederacy, they sold to the United States their claims in Illinois and Missouri; the consolidated tribes, under the names of Peoria and Kaskaskia, were assigned a reservation on the Osage River in Kansas. In 1854, the Wea and Piankashaw united with them, and in 1868, the entire body removed to Indian Territory in Oklahoma, where they remained.

The French:

1673 Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet explored the shores of Peoria. 1680 Robert Cavalier Sieur de LaSalle and Henri de Tonti constructed Fort Crevecoeur on the east bank of the Illinois River. 1691 Old Peorias Fort and Village

Tonti and Francois Daupin de LaForest built Fort St. Louis II (frequently called Fort Pimiteoui), believed to have been located at the foot of Mary and Adams streets. The Immaculate Conception Mission was established here by Jesuit missionaries. A village grew up around the fort. This first European settlement in Illinois had trading posts, a blacksmith shop, a chapel, a winepress, and a windmill.
During the 1760s Jean Baptiste Maillet, a French-Canadian, assumed a leadership role in the village. In 1773 Maillet sold his property to Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable[2], Peoria's most notable black settler, who later founded Chicago.

With British victory in the French & Indian War in 1763, France relinquished the Illinois Territory to Great Britain. However, the British did not effectively take immediate control and the French villagers remained. In 1778 George Rogers Clark captured the Illinois Country for Virginia, and in 1784 Virginia ceded the Territory to the United States.

1778 The New Village:

General Clark appointed Maillet military commander in 1778. Maillet moved 1.5 miles south of the old village and built a fortified house. This settlement later became known as "LaVille de Maillet." It is now the site of downtown Peoria. The New Village had log houses and barns surrounded by gardens, orchards, and roaming farm animals. Carpenter, blacksmith, cobbler, carriage, and trading shops lined the narrow streets. The French villagers had also constructed a large windmill, winepress, an underground wine vault, and a gilt-lettered wilderness chapel.

The War of 1812:

American forces thought the French villagers were supporting Indian skirmishes with the westward-bound pioneers. In October 1812, they massacred the inhabitants of Chief Black Partridge's village. A few weeks later, the Americans burned French Peoria to the ground, took the inhabitants captive, and transported them downriver to Alton. These acts were later condemned and the French villagers were compensated for their losses by an act of the United States Congress. The Native Americans, who for centuries had enjoyed the bounty of the Pimiteoui valley, were forced to abandon it and migrate west.

The Americans:

1813 American soldiers erected Fort Clark where the French village once stood ? now the site of Liberty Park (Liberty Street and Water Street).
1819 Josiah Fulton, Abner Eads, and five other young men came to Peoria by keelboat and horseback. They were the first American pioneers to settle here.
1825 The county was organized and the village name was officially changed from Fort Clark to Peoria. Until 1831 when Cook County was formed, Chicago was part of Peoria County.
1832 A company of local men, led by Abner Eads, fought in the Blackhawk War. In fear of possible Indian threats, Peoria residents started to rebuild Fort Clark.
1835 Peoria was incorporated as a town. Construction began on a courthouse and jail.
1845 Peoria was incorporated as a city.

The Civil War Era:

The citizens of Peoria were sharply divided on the issue of slavery. Many abolition rallies were met with resistance from Southern sympathizers. The Jefferson Street home of Moses Pettengill, a wealthy local merchant, was a station on the Underground Railroad.

1854 Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas gave impassioned speeches on the courthouse steps regarding the issue of slavery. The three-hour speech Lincoln gave is considered a landmark in his career and established the foundation for the principles of self-government and liberty for all people that would carry him to the White House six years later.
1861 The day the Civil War began, Peoria Mayor William Willard led a war recruitment rally for eager volunteers. Camp Lyon, where 7500 Union soldiers were trained, was established at the west gate of Glen Oak Park.
1862 Camp Peoria was organized near Adams and Mary streets.
In all, 536 Peoria County men gave their lives for the preservation of the Union.
The Early 1990s:

Besides being a prominent stop on the Vaudeville tour, Peoria was known as a wide-open town of liquor, entertainment, and sometimes indulged in the more risque side of things. Because of its proximity to river transportation and access to corn for grain-alcohol, Peoria was one of the largest manufacturers of liquor in the United States. Many of the mansions that remain on High Street and Moss Avenue are a direct result of the Peoria Whiskey Baron era.

Peoria Today:

Peoria, Illinois, today, is the largest city on the Illinois River and the county seat of Peoria CountyGR6, Illinois, in the United States. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 112,936. The Greater Peoria Metro area, including suburbs and surrounding, has a population of 370,000.

Peoria has become famous as a representation of the average American city because of its demographics and its perceived mainstream Midwestern culture. On the Vaudeville circuit, it was said that if an act would succeed in Peoria, it would work anywhere. The question "Will it play in Peoria?" has now become a metaphor for whether something appeals to the American mainstream public, and Peoria is often used as a test market for new products, services, and public policy polling.

http://www.historicpeoria.com

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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 19:07 GMT 
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On road, load lightening


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 19:21 GMT 
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J.D. wrote:
My buddy just talked to Stu inside the hotel next door. The tour buses are around back. Does Bob usually stay at the same places as the band?


I think it's a sometimes yes, sometimes no kind of thing. In other words...who knows.


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 19:38 GMT 
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smoke wrote:
J.D. wrote:
My buddy just talked to Stu inside the hotel next door. The tour buses are around back. Does Bob usually stay at the same places as the band?


I think it's a sometimes yes, sometimes no kind of thing. In other words...who knows.


God Knows!


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 20:21 GMT 
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Yes he does and they'll be gone right after the concert.

Something big with WILCO tonight :)


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 22:28 GMT 
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2 $ beer. Very Americana


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 22:44 GMT 
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are you there merry llama?


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 22:53 GMT 
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Peoria, Illinois - birthplace of the great Richard Pryor! Pryor was born and raised in his grandmother's whore house in Peoria, and often referred to Peoria in his standup.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umxCnLzDjUI


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 23:11 GMT 

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Location: Illinois
I'm here. Electric Trio just finished.


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 23:13 GMT 
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bobschool wrote:
are you there merry llama?


Just arrived ground zero. Easy to get a good spot . Young crowd. Missed RT, regrettably, mmj about to take stage.


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 23:24 GMT 
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You're gonna get a good show, Llama!!!


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 23:25 GMT 
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A Merry Llama wrote:
2 $ beer. Very Americana

Miller High Life or Blatts?


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 23:35 GMT 
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Beer was $9 in Cincinnati. They were 24oz cans of Bud Light or Yuengling. There was also a craft beer tent with 12oz cans of a few other brands.


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 23:47 GMT 
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ain't_talkin' wrote:
I'm here. Electric Trio just finished.

How were they?


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PostPosted: Thu July 11th, 2013, 23:49 GMT 
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shitjoy wrote:
You're gonna get a good show, Llama!!!

Shitty is correct. Have an Americanallama of a time!
You too Ain't Talkin'!


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