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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 06:14 GMT 
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Spring tour is behind us. Summer is ahead. the ads are up:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jy2Xdbac ... r_embedded


Time is shrinking to get familiar with Dylan's supporting acts this summer. Here, we'll install a little informational primer for those who are interested in knowing a little more about the bands involved. I'm guessing people want to know a little less about whether they suck or kicka$$, and perhaps would value some information about their history and career arc, and how they might intersect with Bob. So I'd like to invite people who have knowledge about these bands to contribute.

Start Here, on Smoke's "Live Show" thread, where show samples and notable concerts/recordings/performances of the bands will hopefully accumulate.




and Here we will discuss the Beck Hansen - or Beck -
or the man who making is making a Jones Beach cameo.
Image


There are a lot of interesting things about Beck, and a lot of connections to Dylan. Here's a song of his that samples a well known Van Morrison Cover of a well known Bob Dylan song for his well known song, Jackass.

Beck

Van Morrison
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7WJHdE0__I


Two other items I'd like to draw attention to is his extremely interesting website and the recording projects he has going on, and his relationship/handling of the media. He seems hyperconscious of it, like Dylan, and after a bit of research I learned that one or both of his parents where Fluxus artists - so dealing with & questioning spectacle is kind of their thing.

So on his website, he's got this thing called Record Club.
http://www.beck.com/recordclub/
Groups of recording artists will casually get together and re-record a classic or nonclassic album of the group's choice. Jeff Tweedy from Wilco has contributed, and the last one I think people did was a Yanni album. yes, Yanni.
And he's also got this thing where he informally has conversations with other notable folks and has casual conversation and publishes it.

Regarding media/crowds, he seems to have made a move that would make Mr. Dylan happy, for a 2006 tour, instead of putting his band up on the big screens, he had the filming of a professional puppet show, which was also taking place on stage, which was mimicking the activities the band members made on stage, up on the big screens. Clever subversion. http://nymag.com/arts/popmusic/features/22794/

Image

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akHg97X-Fo0

and here are the Beck relevant discussions that have transpired already in these fine halls.
viewtopic.php?f=19&t=73662&hilit=beck
and this interesting one that's a little scary to re-open.
viewtopic.php?f=19&t=29761&hilit=beck,
but has a really nice Letterman performance:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ko08zsqxc2I


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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 06:44 GMT 
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Location: ..right behind the living - just in front of the dead.
.. by request
- hERe ya' go Troub ...

.. "Ah! ..Bech..." .. :arrow:
- i might be thinkin' of somethin' else...
http://www.youtube.com/embed/73J0gTBLI3c

.. oh! L@@k! = A Two-fer...
315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/pceBcOGL7nI

.. and how 'bout this wonder platter!
- 'Stereopathetic Soulmanure' .. 8)


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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 06:52 GMT 
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that's one of his early ones - I haven't heard it, and I can't recall if it was out before he cracked it with Loser or not (which is on Mellow Gold, thanks grumpy). I think it's one the group that was released between Loser and Odelay. Released very close with another album that captured his folk interests. This one captures his noise interests. By Odelay he merged the two sounds together.

Full Album of above:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9mi70JgWtI

The Folk album, One foot in the Grave. Probably an accessible first step for people who around here who have no clue who he is.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IT967fUFuYw


then again, it may not be considered very good by them. these are both early career experimental before he really souped up the studio. listening to Foot in the Grave now and the lyrics are pretty pedestrian...

if listening to the Folk album, bare in mind: this is 1994, roughly 10 years or so before alternative morphed into indie, and well before indie morphed into indie folk


Last edited by Troubadour64 on Sun May 12th, 2013, 07:04 GMT, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 07:03 GMT 
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Location: ..right behind the living - just in front of the dead.
.. i went and borrowed this from our Buddy Al Music -

"Within months of the release of Mellow Gold, Beck released his second album, Stereopathetic Soulmanure,
a schizophrenic collection of lo-fi recordings from between 1988 and 1993. Much of the music on the album
draws from the noisy, experimental post-punk of Sonic Youth and the dirty, primitive junk rock of x Galore;
his absurdist sense of humor surfaces only rarely, and only in the guise of such sophomoric cuts as "Puttin It Down"
and "Satan Gave Me a Taco," while his sense of songcraft is inaudible. Essentially, the record was both a palate cleanser,
one designed to scare away the "Loser" fans, and a bid for indie credibility, since the music on Stereopathetic is equally
as uncompromising and as unlistenable as Sonic Youth or their many imitators at their most extreme."

.. it's = FUN. And that 'One Foot In the Grave' you mentioned is very good also.
- i forgot i had it - i'm goona go put it on right now! .. Cool thread Troub .. 8)


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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 07:07 GMT 
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thank you for filling in the blanks! that's exactly what i read a few weeks ago....

he brought up One Foot in the Grave as one of the ones he likes a lot. the rest he thought were challenging to really represent or capture or present the sound he really had in his head. Where have we heard that before? perhaps his catalogue needs the mono re-issue treatment and everything will be illuminated. :wink:

"Satan gave me a taco" :lol:

I haven't looked at song titles for a long time... I should start again.


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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 19:25 GMT 
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Two Mother's Day songs from Beck for you:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9L2v6qMso0k

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5c67dRq3dVo


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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 20:13 GMT 
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I saw Beck, he opened for The Rolling Stones on their Bigger Bang Tour at Hershey.
Interesting show, I wish I could have seen it in a smaller venue. The size of the place
kind of swamped it, plus most of the crowd milling around not paying attention didn't help.
I suppose it could be that way at Americanarama shows too. Hope not, The dude is worth
a listen, at least, in my book.


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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 21:37 GMT 
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Them - Its All Over Now Baby Blue (as sampled by Beck on Jackass)
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=aZeSsYmstfY


I have Odelay. Time to break it back out. I've always liked Beck.
Never seen him live...too bad.


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PostPosted: Sun May 12th, 2013, 21:49 GMT 
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..Anybody clock in here on occasion? .. :arrow:
- There are some great projects taken place,
and prolly more many to come. ... 8)
.... bECK'S RECORD CLUB ....
http://www.beck.com/recordclub/


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PostPosted: Mon May 13th, 2013, 13:03 GMT 
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oops the picture has been made unavailable, sorry fans, here's what he looks like when he's not a puppet.

Image


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PostPosted: Mon May 13th, 2013, 13:37 GMT 
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Surely one of the more important artists of the last 20-ish years.

His last "album" was issued as sheet music ONLY, with fans posting their versions of his new songs online. Which is pretty cool.

I wish he were on more shows, I'd like to see him live someday.


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PostPosted: Mon May 13th, 2013, 14:15 GMT 
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a wonderful Cageian gesture on his part. There are murmurings of audiophiles at Hoffman's site recording versions of them...

Image

i've been meaning to get it, but the conundrum is that it's rather expensive for a CD, but at the same price point as a new record. On the other had, it is a very economically priced work of Art (which may or may not make it's way to a discounted books website, which is what i'm holding out for).

Here's a little bit about Fluxus Art, which is the context from which I think he's working. Often they would create 'do it yourself' objects that would create an interactive artistic experience. Thus the bridge between visual arts and music. Yoko Ono was associated with Fluxus, and much more highly regarded in such circles than in music circles.

http://fluxmuseum.org/

one of my first 'drawing' experiences occurred in my music theory class i took in high school, during which we had several transposition assignments. I became quite fond of the imagery of the notes and the staffs and the curvature of all the symbols. my teacher said I could do that professionally, but it was before the computer age I think. I remember still looking at blue screens for my wordprocessing assignments.

speaking of palindromes (it's not properly a palindrome i know, more of a Palin-drome maybe). I found out my nephews like Weird Al yesterday. i couldn't find the proper video, but I exposed them to this yesterday.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxYnd-OEXRU


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PostPosted: Tue May 14th, 2013, 15:51 GMT 
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Beck, running out of the barracks...

Beck's entrance into the Pop/post grunge/musical smorgasboard of the nineties that had the nutritional equivalent of a Shakey's Buffet was with this fine album, which can only be considered and appreciated properly I think, about 10 years later. So hear is a description 10 years later about the album Mellow Gold


Image


Released 1994.

It's been exactly ten years since Beck came out of nowhere and hit it big with this Bluesy/Folky/Hip-Hoppish/Noisy Rock album.
While Grunge was at the receiving end of a loaded shotgun. Beck was showing a more unusual yet entertaining and amusing side to depression. This was Beck's first major label album. Made with a mere $200 bucks in his wallet. Produced by himself, Karl Stephenson, Tom Rothrock, and Rob Schnapf. The Album was recorded on a 4-Track Mixer. He Quickly got the attention of Kids around the nation with his huge debut hit single "Loser", in which he also recorded most of the footage for the music video himself; Beck was beginning to feel high.

...Well I guess that's what happens when you're acquainted with Bong Load Records. :amaze:

1. Loser -
This song while containing some of Beck's most negative lyrics, it still has a lot of humor. Consisting of a looped sample of Dr. John's "I Walk On Guilded Splinters". Beck's lyrics through the verses are almost rapped lazily without effort on purpose, moving a song with this 'Slacker' tone that Beck gets away with without sounding too dull. The chorus of this song is in spanglish. ("Soy Un Perdedor..." stands for "I'm A Loser...") The sample "I'm a driver, I'm a winner, things are gonna change, I can feel it" is from Steve Hanft's movie Kill The Moonlight. This song was huge, it was basically one of the songs that defined the 90's. While it may not be his best, it is the song that he is most remembered for. 5/5

2. Pay No Mind (Snoozer) -
Starts off with a friend of Beck's threatening Beck over his answering machine to put this song on the album. This is a very mellow sounding folk type song with yet, more of Beck's humor at it's finest and a nice Harmonica solo. The line "Give the finger to the Rock & Roll singer as he's dancing upon your paycheck" never fails to make me laugh. One of my favorite Beck songs. 4.5/5

3. [b]x' With My Head (Mountain Dew Rock) -
This song reminds me of Creedence Clearwater Revival so much. It's a very nice Rock song, With a brilliant catchy chorus that just x with your head. It's a great song to listen to while having a few beer with your pops or just hanging out. 4.5/5

4. Whiskeyclone, Hotel City 1997 -
This is a very odd track coming from an odd type like Beck. It consists of percussive instruments (Maracas perhaps?) rattling as an old acoustic guitar plays while Beck sings in a very melancholy tone "...She can talk to squirrels." As I said before It's a Bluesy-like odd track that will take more than one listen to actually be able to appreciate.. 4/5#

5. Soul Suckin' Jerk -
One of the first songs I actually enjoyed a lot when I first heard this CD. It has some weird changes in between. Going from Almost hip-hoppish to Heavy, then going into a polka type moment with an accordion playing during a chameleon like Chorus., which then follows a nice drum fill that goes into something more funkier. The lyrics on this song are hilarious with an odd story of getting back at your boss, and getting fired; afterwards witnessing some very strange events. 4.5/5

6. Truck Drivin' Neighbors Downstairs (Yellow Sweat) -
Starts off with a recording of two of Beck's neighbors getting in a fight late one night. The loud noise you hear is of a window being smashed.
The music is two acoustic guitars. While Beck sings with a deep voice, imitating a drunken fat loser. It's a silly song, but it's still good. 4/5

7. Sweet Sunshine -
Starts off with a the sounds of a music box, then goes into a very funked up drum beat, followed by some distorted rock vocals coming from Beck. Filled with noises and effects. This song isn't one of the highlights but it's still a good one that doesn't need to be skipped. 4/5

8. Beercan -
A very hip-hoppish and Bluesy track. This song has a lot of effects. Beck's lyrics are nice but hard to make out at times. The rhythm itself just gives you the urge to want to dance. Great song. 4.5/5

9. Steal My Body Home -
This is my favorite song off this album. It's a very depressing sounding track which, once again, contains more of Beck's humor. This time it shows up later though. Changing the song almost entirely from a bass heavy slow paced song with what sounds like a sitar, to a jangly percussion and noisy piece with almost what sounds like Beck was just banging on random stuff in his kitchen. Giving this mellow beauty an extremely weird ending. This track almost sounds out of place but it's still, IMO, one of the highlights on this album. 5/5

10. Nitemare Hippy Girl -
A very folky acoustic guitar and drum song with some nice (and funny) lyrics about a Nitemare Hippy girl. :p Not much to say about this song. It's just a simple but nice sounding piece. 4/5

11. Mutherfuker -
No that's not a typo. This is the heaviest track on the album. It's a Very Noisy Short Punk-like song with Beck's distorted voice oftenly yelling out "Everyone's out to get you Muthafuker!" over some guitar feedback and a very hyped up punk beat. 4/5

12. Black Hole -
This is the last song on the album. And probably the most serious sounding as well. It contains a Violin in it as well. It's very folky. I'm sure this song will not fail to get caught in your head. Beck's voice fits the melody perfectly. Repeating the first line twice. "Watching..watching..." and so on...
It is a great album closer. And a good way to keep the album on a more 'Mellow' note. 4.5/5

...Don't forget to turn your stereo down for that noise up ahead though. ;)

This album might go a bit overboard on the silliness. But Beck still manages to bring lots of laughs from this album. 10 years later and I still enjoy this album to its fullest.

(sounds like it's the perspective of a committed fan, my apologies to be so 'MSNBC' about it all.)


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PostPosted: Tue May 14th, 2013, 16:52 GMT 
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ragman99 wrote:
I saw Beck, he opened for The Rolling Stones on their Bigger Bang Tour at Hershey.
Interesting show, I wish I could have seen it in a smaller venue. The size of the place
kind of swamped it, plus most of the crowd milling around not paying attention didn't help.
I suppose it could be that way at Americanarama shows too. Hope not, The dude is worth
a listen, at least, in my book.


kinda makes me think of Grateful Dead openers, where fans had the right to ignore to opening acts, but were rewarded if they didn't. And for the most part the band's could surpass that threshold of being ignored. That could be hard in the Stone's scene though, particularly with the distance between those two.


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PostPosted: Wed May 15th, 2013, 16:29 GMT 
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I'll write up a few things I have to say about a couple of my favorite albums, and I will be blatantly reckless about my comparisons to Dylan, just to characterize the statement/issue I am trying to illustrate with respect to Beck's work, even at the expense of the strength of the connection, so please forgive if I overreach. If I say Beck's album 'so and so' is like Bringing it all back home in such and such a way, I am in no way trying to make the case that 'so and so' is of equal or similar value as BIABH. Fair enough?

The albums I'll probably discuss are Midnight Vultures, Sea Change, and either Information or Guero, so if anything has anything to say about the classic Odelay or any of the others, by all means. Modern Guilt is on my to be acquired before the tour list, his last before the songbook, so if anyone has anything to offer about those, by all means.

Image

I like Midnight Vultures and I'm not afraid to say it. I had just come around to Beck at the time - I had been keeping a close eye on him from the radio, and it seems like he was getting on with the kids of my day well enough. Odelay was supposed to be his first real explosive statement, as it resulted from a fine pairing with the Dust Brothers, who are the geniuses behind this fine movie score:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZhmQgw5VEI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTqyTxl8Kao
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuWIhaW_ ... 0BEDACA6DC

they produced Odelay and introduced the artist to a healthy dose of commercial success, the hits are well known off this tremendous album.

Which leads us to Midnight Vultures, the 1999 album that had been panned by his critics as something along the lines of Another Side (but not for the same reasons). Actually, Mutations is known as his stop/gap album and Midnight Vultures was to be his Bringing it All Back Home, and because of some concerted efforts and statements Beck makes (which are more similar to Dylan's bag of tricks in the eighties, calling out the characters and the suits of the music business and the spectacle around it), the album was criticized at the time as having a little too much navel gazing. In retrospect, he wasn't navel gazing, but trying to draw attention to a growing black hole that exists and has expanded in the music business since the innocent days of the late nineties.
whether he did that or not with trite artistic expression is up to the listener to decide.

And that listener can decide nearly on a track by track basis, which is what this listener does:
1. Sexx Laws - catchy, invigorating, simplistic. But lays out the themes of the album pretty appropriately.
2. Nicotine & Gravy - beautiful descent into the sound that enraptures this album. it's, well, enrapturing. There are three communicating tracks on this album that make it seem like a Brian Wilson effort:
Nicotine & Gravy, Peaches & Cream, and Milk & Honey,
which effectively transform the album experience into a play in three acts. One of the reasons I like this song is that it firmly establishes Beck as that singer who can play the game of cat and mouse with his listener professionally and for the duration. Lot's of hooks in this one....musically.
I'll feed you fruit that doesn't exist
I'll leave graffiti where you've never been kissed
I'll do your laundry message your soul
I'll turn you over to the highway patrol

3. Mixed Bizness - fun, studio tricks, with some fun social smirking - along the lines of Cat's in the Well thematically.
4. Get Real Paid - A high point of the album for sure. Sonic bliss. Sophisticated and Prince-like.
5. Hollywood Freaks - I think he was criticized for having an 'affected voice'? funny. There was an effort at the time to discourage white boys from trying to pursue mixing maneuvers and I'm not sure why, but it may have been because of what the Beastie Boys were up to.
6. Peaches & Cream opens with 'don't tell your right hand baby what your left hand do' & closes with 'keep your lamplight trimmed and burning'. words of wisdom and great humor from Beck. sharp and sly he is.
7. Broken Train - i'd call this the quintessential Beck song sound, prior to 2002 at least. Percussive, a few ups and downs, a good ride, no harm done.
8. Milk & Honey - at the time I was thankful for a fine anthem rocker, I was a little too young and self conscious for all the dancing the album made me do previously. Very Blonde on Blah attitude for this one.
9. Beautiful Way - i'd call this the quintessential Beck song sound, prior to 2002 at least. Percussive, a few ups and downs, a good ride, no harm done.
10. Pressure Zone - good for driving, walking, running, or strolling in Van Gogh Park while shrooming. Passes the litmus tests. it may not have aged well, but it precedes the sound more fully realized on Guero & Information.
He's able to socially critique behind a layer of enjoyable sounds - the true test of strength for any folk artist of the late nineties/post 2000s
Cherry Gardens feel like ice
hazard lights from her past
underneath the broken bridge
Hookers hug illegal dads
Masterpieces liquidate in fiertile tears
I could sleep inside her bones
a hundred years
Lizards in the pressure zone
Mother knows it's only a phase

11. Debra - another high point, literally and figuratively. This song is targeted as one that would make a beautiful cover for Jim James to perform live.

Full Album:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-ibPnDzG6Q

Also, side note, while he offers interviews sparingly, he's extremely accessible in how he's been able to portray his 'story' to the press & public.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrWVIs1D3-g
(I think that's his dad & mom sharing the interview with him).

http://www.coverdude.com/covers/beck-mi ... -14279.jpg

he's also a very sticky guy in the art world, songs about readymades, covers of readymades, albums being made into objects, etc:
http://www.kpiatkowski.com/22034/173351 ... e-vultures

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PostPosted: Wed May 15th, 2013, 16:40 GMT 
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Troubadour64 wrote:

Modern Guilt is on my to be acquired before the tour list,


Definately acquire it at once. Not because the cover and title seem to be a clever if subtle play on Dylan's own Modern Times, but because it's really good. I look forward to reading your Midnight Vultures review and hearing the album again via youtube. I got it when it came out, and as his
"proper" follow-up to Odelay it was slightly disappointing (what wouldn't be?) but I do remember liking it quite a bit after repeated listening.


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PostPosted: Wed May 15th, 2013, 16:50 GMT 
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^ oh how awesome, I didn't realize that. The irony is that it was probably Modern Times and Dylans stuff at the time that kept me from pretty much listening to anything else so I missed it. I do remember getting Guero & Information around that time though, because I was behind...I'm quite upset at how hard it is to get his stuff on vinyl. seems intentional. It was given a fine vinyl treatment when it came out as far as I can tell and seems to be pretty scarce. His stuff does sound great on CD as well though.


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PostPosted: Wed May 15th, 2013, 19:27 GMT 
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just found this phenomenal experience. He's taking back your right to hear music, one bandwidth at a time. People should pay him taxes.

Beck Reimagines David Bowie's "Sound and Vision"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnOmrDz ... r_embedded

Image

weird, that image is from a magazine called Death and Taxes
http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/194239/ ... orchestra/

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and for current progress on the Song Reader efforts,
http://www.songreader.net/


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PostPosted: Wed May 15th, 2013, 20:48 GMT 
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not the only guy around here with a basement


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQICFfHnVJk

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PostPosted: Wed May 15th, 2013, 21:00 GMT 
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A little about Odelay, which is too hot to talk about.
If any album had Blonde on Blonde aspirations in the nineties, this may have been the one!

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a contextual overview, with youtube links:
http://www.tgdaily.com/games-and-entert ... cks-odelay


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MeetmeThere!


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PostPosted: Thu May 16th, 2013, 01:54 GMT 
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BECK BREAK #1

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Not really a better place to put this, but I can't think of a better collection to include in your readypack this summer than this fine collection of musicians and songwriters.

All speaking from their heart to a one they love.
Better than Dylan's mismash process years later.
On this one, Beck plays the part of Jack White, and Sheryl Crow plays the role of Nora Jones.
Bob Dylan plays Bob Dylan.
Image

I hadn't realized it was pressed to vinyl or I'd already have it in my collection -
Clocking in at 12.98 on amazon, I'd have to say it looks like a steal!

Plus it adds an enlightening connection to the link between Hank Williams, SeaChange andBloodon the Tracks (see the forthcoming notes on SeaChange if this sounds silly)

{not in order, but here's a great place to start:}
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zrn-OAl3 ... 229B6A24F2

the Beck track is not on the list, but I found it here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtctBc4t-dI

Gram Parsons, Johnny Cash and George Jones have all inspired such current alt-country renegades as Ryan Adams, the Jayhawks and Old 97's. Original country maverick Hank Williams, however, arguably remains the most influential figure for anyone who's ever picked a twangy guitar and cried in his or her beer about sour love and hard times.

Several of Williams' more successful descendants — including Bob Dylan, Keith Richards, Tom Petty and Beck — have recorded tracks for the tribute album Timeless (see "Dylan, Emmylou Harris To Pay Tribute To Hank Williams"), which is scheduled for release September 25, eight days after what would have been Williams' 78th birthday.

Williams died at age 29 following a short yet highly influential life of excess and indulgence. During the four years prior to his death, however, he virtually wrote the country-music handbook, crafting a long string of hits including "Long Gone Lonesome Blues," which is interpreted by Sheryl Crow on Timeless, and "Cold, Cold Heart," which Lucinda Williams covers on the album.

Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris team up for "Lost on the River," Beck covers "Your Cheatin' Heart," Keith Richards plays "You Win Again" and Williams' grandson, Hank Williams III, sings "I'm a Long Gone Daddy." Timeless was produced by Luke Lewis, president of Lost Highway Records, which is releasing the album. In addition to the tribute, the coffee-table book "Hank Williams: Snapshots From the Lost Highway," is scheduled for October publication by Da Capo Press.

The Timeless track list, according to the project's publicist:

Beck - "Your Cheatin' Heart"
Hank Williams III - "I'm a Long Gone Daddy"
Emmylou Harris - "Alone and Forsaken"
Bob Dylan - "I Can't Get You Off of My Mind"
Lucinda Williams - "Cold, Cold Heart"
Sheryl Crow - "Long Gone Lonesome Blues"
Keb' Mo' - "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry"
Keith Richards - "You Win Again"
Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris - "Lost on the River"
Tom Petty - "You're Gonna Change (Or I'm Gonna Leave)"
Johnny Cash - "I Dreamed About Mama Last Night"
Ryan Adams - "Lovesick Blues"


{that's not the order either}

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PostPosted: Tue May 21st, 2013, 19:42 GMT 
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I picked up this CD called War Child presents Heroes: An Album To Benefit Children Affected By War

Opens with Beck doing Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat.

some other interesting stuff on there too.


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PostPosted: Thu June 6th, 2013, 21:27 GMT 
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^ on youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAGx0Lkq8tM

Live:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XjhAzzyPJ0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHSa5XxTxzk

I'm playing Sea Change today and reading about relationships between Beck, Hank & Bob, and perhaps Jack and Johnny.

Quote:
http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/617-sea-change/
It's easy to romanticize Beck as the scruffy wannabe who lived on friends' couches for a year, recording a new song every day on a beat-up four-track; absorbing Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music and old school hip-hop with equal enthusiasm. The aptly titled "Loser", his biggest and most career-defining hit, was recorded in a friend's living room for kicks. His first live performances were on hijacked mics at other peoples' gigs: he'd just step up with a guitar or harmonica between acts and entertain while the often bemused next band set up their drums. On the homemade tapes and scrapped-together compilations that comprised his earliest recorded output, Beck cobbled together all of his influences-- noise, hardcore, country, rap, folk, grunge, R&B;, found sound and classic rock-- and melded it into his own junkyard punk.

Over subsequent releases Beck continued to refine the art of juxtaposing achingly poignant folk songs with lo-fi guitar freakouts, collages of dialogue and noise, and Radio Shack hip-hop. With Odelay he managed to pull all of these disparate elements together in an artful way, blending nimble dobro guitar figures, say, with sample-heavy backbeats, vocal samples, banjo, a loop of Van Morrison covering Bob Dylan-- bottles and cans, or just clap your hands. At live shows, or on Chris Douridas' morning program at KCRW, Beck would often play never-recorded songs he'd likely composed just a few days before playing them, exquisitely voiced and effortlessly brilliant.
What happened to that guy?

Mutations, the genteel quickie Beck recorded on the cheap in 1998, was largely a knee-jerk reaction to the daunting task of ever having to follow up Odelay at all. His label even reneged on a provision that allowed him to release records on independents, and it's little wonder: with Mutations, shit-hot producer Nigel Godrich had crafted a slick, almost clinically glossy record, with clean guitars that never buzzed or hit bum notes. And while "Cold Brains", "Nobody's Fault But My Own", and "Canceled Check" are great songs, lesser tracks like "Lazy Flies" and "We Live Again" were shamelessly gussied-up with tired space-rock bleeps and whooshes-- and I won't even get into the made-for-Starbucks faux-exotica of "Tropicalia". No offense to Pitchfork alum Neil Lieberman, who praised the album mellifluously, but in 2002 we're up to our asses in "futuristic roots albums". Let's call Mutations what it was: a soft-rock One Foot in the Grave made with Pro Tools and a heart of steel.

Perhaps it's telling that his seventh studio album is titled Sea Change-- for rather than the smooth, utterly inoffensive quirks of Mutations, Beck opts for abrupt changes in temperament and lush instrumentation. Recording again with Godrich and his regular band (Smokey Hormel, Roger Manning, Joey Waronker, and Justin Meldal-Johnsen) pounding out a track a day over an intense two-week period, Sea Change rightfully feels like a sequel to Mutations with no alarms and no surprises. In fact, opener, "The Golden Age", would feel right at home on Mutations itself, with its gentle mid-tempo strumming, lonesome wails of pedal steel and predictable space-rock flourishes.

A cloud of mind-numbing melancholy hangs over Sea Change, from the world-weary grandpa-Beck voice he employs on most of the tracks to its unfailingly morose lyrics. "These days I barely get by/ I don't even try," Beck sings in "The Golden Age", and that's just the tip of the jagged iceberg that looms ever larger in Sea Change's periscope. It's obvious just from perusing the song titles-- "Lonesome Tears," "End of the Day," "Already Dead," "Lost Cause"-- that the 2002 model Beck is one sad sack (and it's impossible not to armchair quarterback which of Beck's celebrity girlfriends inspired such gut-wrenching bile). But though the songs are jam-packed with typical Beck imagery (stray dogs, moonlight drives, diamonds as kaleidoscopes) there's very little here that measures up to the eloquence of "She is all, and everything else is small."

It's pretty obvious what Beck is shooting for with Sea Change: that timeless quality that his heroes Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan and Nick Drake seemed to exude with every recording. But here, as on Mutations, he confuses lyrical simplicity and standard-tuning, key-of-C songwriting with the unpretentious directness of his idols. Too often Beck saddles these songs with half-baked cliches and easy rhymes: "sky" always rhymes with "die", "care" always rhymes with "there". He doesn't even sound like himself on many of Sea Change's more paint-by-numbers cuts. On "Guess I'm Doing Fine" Beck emotes in an unnatural croak that's likely the product of a digitally decelerated vocal track, but he mostly just sounds constipated. Likewise with the karaoke-honed Gordon Lightfoot impression Beck turns in on the hoary "End of the Day": "It's nothing that I haven't seen before/ But it still kills me like it did before."

Elsewhere, Beck mines Mutations' folky space-rock vibe with more artful and ear-pleasing results. The chiming guitars and groaning strings of "Lost Cause" creak and sway like the tired masts of a pirate ship; washes of backward sound snake through the melody like restless ghosts. "The Golden Age", with its chorus of tinkling glockenspiels and cavernous echo, is a pleasant diversion in the vein of Mutations' "Cold Brains." An unnecessary remake of 1994's "It's All In Your Mind" is tarted up with the omnipresent synth blips and drums, but some tastefully distant banjo licks and Suzie Katayama's swooning cello lend the song a resigned majesty the original certainly never portended.

But it's Sea Change's most daring tracks that are ultimately its most satisfying. Beck's father, David Campbell, contributes inventive string arrangements to three cuts: "Paper Tiger" is a low-key triumph, with a minimal bed of bass and drums punched up by sudden, deep string attacks-- Beck's "Glass Onion," if you will; the deliciously overwrought "Lonesome Tears" is an uncomfortably raw display of emotion, with an unpredictable melody and unbelievably tortured chorus ("How could this love, ever-turning/ Never turn its eye on me?" Beck questions as the song builds to a cathartic tsunami of violins and ear-splitting noise); the moody, cinematic "Round the Bend" cribs the cadence and nocturnal vibe of Nick Drake's "River Man", augmented by plucky upright bass and Beck's subdued, almost intentionally slurred vocal.


But Cap'n Beck saves his strangest songs for the second half of the album, with the enigmatic "Sunday Sun" bathing odd, disjointed lyrics ("Jealous minds walk in a line, and their faces jade the strain") in a Brian Wilson-inspired glow, with mixed but cosmetically acceptable results. The unsettling sea shanty "Little One" is a return to form, with a fetching minor-chord hook and creepy lyrics ("Cold bones tied together by black ropes we pulled from a swing") intoned in a convincing Kurt Cobain growl.

He knots it all together, sorta, with the anticlimactic closer "Side of the Road", which plods along awkwardly amid busy slide-guitar work and a rambling electric piano. It's a far cry from the back-porch perfection of "Ramshackle", but given what it reveals, it'll do. "Something better than this, someplace I'd like to go," sings Beck in a tremulous voice seemingly decades beyond his 32 years. "To let all I've learned tell me what I know/ About the kind of life I never thought I'd live."

On Sea Change, Beck sounds intentionally world-weary, but it's the songs themselves that sound labored. Is it no longer enough for Beck to write profound, genre-bending tunes that stand on their own? Does he really need the crutch of suffocating overproduction and bold strokes of orchestration to shock us into caring again? Two turntables and a microphone, man!

'Cause there was a time when Beck didn't need Nigel Godrich to space out his white-collar blues. A winter spent in Calvin Johnson's basement, an afternoon spent with a beatbox and a slide guitar in a friend's living room was all he needed to pluck otherworldly songs from the fertile Beckscape of desolated views, crazy towns, lost causes and stolen boats. Given how much soul-searching obviously went into this record, it's distressing how little soul the finished product actually has. If there's anything the self-absorbed murk of Sea Change illustrates with unmistakable clarity, it's that Beck has forgotten how to connect with his inner loser-- and it's nobody's fault but his own.


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PostPosted: Tue July 2nd, 2013, 22:32 GMT 
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Beck, on the Horizon:

yes, I know Beck doesn't play til Jones Beach, but it will be a big day for him,

he's got things in the works...

such as this:
(click to listen, new single on 12 " vinyl. an unavoidable title for a single it seems).

http://www.beckiwontbelong.com

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as well as http://store.beck.com/products/defriended-12 -

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he may be following the Duke Drama.

also a very strange man he his, hiding behind the radar. He seems to be on tour, but then again he doesn't seem to be.
No tour page on his website, but a host of festival and special type performances.
From what I know this guy knows how to deliver. Look for him to do so at Jones Beach,
or any of these places on and off the way.

http://www.songkick.com/artists/430505- ... dar?page=1

you can find this on his website though:

Gary Wilson self recorded “You Think You Really Know Me” in his parent’s basement in the mid 70′s, pressing only 300 copies. I first heard it in the early 90′s from a cassette copy being passed around. Sounding something like Prince starring in a Dario Argento film, the desperation of the voice in songs like Loneliness and 6.4 = Makeout warped through the music, combining the darkly absurd with something elusive—that weirdness underneath the smooth surface of 70′s mellow pop and countless Three’s Company episodes finally articulated. Rumors of Gary Wilson’s whereabouts, that he had been playing in a Holiday Inn lounge, went around for years. He resurfaced later in a series of performances involving mannequins and copious amounts of cellophane, as well as in a documentary.


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PostPosted: Wed July 3rd, 2013, 00:03 GMT 
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I hear that Cheez Whiz sales tend to skyrocket when he comes around.


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