Expecting Rain

Go to main page
It is currently Wed October 17th, 2018, 04:14 GMT

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 259 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 06:11 GMT 

Joined: Wed February 17th, 2010, 21:36 GMT
Posts: 134
Celebrities in attendance:

Kevin Hearn (Barenaked Ladies, Lou Reed)
Ron Sexsmith
Rubin "Hurricance" Carter


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 06:23 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun January 4th, 2009, 08:02 GMT
Posts: 16219
Location: South of the mountains of Madrid.
BostonAreaBobFan wrote:
1. You Ain't Goin Nowhere.
2. Man in the Long Black Coat with Mark Knopfler
3. Things Have Changed w/MK. "Piano is way too loud".
4. Tangled Up in Blue with MK.
5. Early Roman Kings
6. Joey
7. Rollin' & Tumblin'
8. Visions of Johanna
9. Highway 61 Revisited
10. Sugar Baby
11. Thunder on the Mountain
12. Ballad of a Thin Man
13. Like a Rolling Stone

Band Intros - "Thank You, Friends"

14. All Along the Watchtower
15. Blowin' in the Wind


:D 8) thanks BABF and to all involved


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 06:25 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun December 24th, 2006, 18:12 GMT
Posts: 1849
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Lou Reed wrote:
Ron Sexsmith


Nice guy. Had a few beers with him at the Magic Stick in Detroit some years back and talked at length about Shot Of Love. Good writer as well, still puts on a good show.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 06:34 GMT 

Joined: Mon May 25th, 2009, 06:12 GMT
Posts: 2310
Location: swimming across the pond...
Back from the show. Stood outside after for what seemed like forever..it was about an hour.. bobs busses were there n marks.. marks bus left after a while and bobs two busses were still sitting there so we waited..and waited. My daughter patiently waited for me to say ive had enough..and headed for the subway station. I could have easily waved or called a thank you to them as no one was left near the busses. Maybe they were having a happy hour or maybe they were counting pennies... im sure there were a lot of pennies..the place was really packed.
I was second row and behind the speakers. I could sometimes see the top of bobs head but if he sat at his piano i couldnt see him at all. The show began so awesome that my prayers for some tempest tunes felt more of a possibility.. and yes.. Early Roman Kings..... awesome!! A big woohooo moment.. Joey was the next one..and Sugar Baby was so sweetly done. and VISIONS TOO~~!! :o It never seemed to lose momentum~~
Bob was into dancing but something was spilled next to his mic stand.. dont know if some idiot tossed a drink up there or what but bob wasnt going near it. He instead danced a little bit behind his mark.. but when he did Ballad of a Thin Man he came out and around it a bit. He really got into the harp for it.. and everyone went crazy. It was a great show ..
I wish they wouldnt allow alcohol at the seats.. i saw some really messed up drunk people that were so annoying and of course lets not forget Bubbles, the guy beside me that nearly dry humped my leg during the encore. Honestly... get a grip. My daughter in row 20 had a massively tall man in front of her..and smokers smoking behind her..not even the good stuff.. plus had a gal rip her shirt off in front of her..and waved it in the air. :lol:
Overall though..im glad i was able to get my youngest with me to a concert... she said bob may not sing like he did but he sure can play.. and loved the band. My year has been a good one. i feel like it was probably the best year ever. I thank you all for being a part of this with me.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 06:42 GMT 
Titanium Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue March 27th, 2007, 20:24 GMT
Posts: 7834
BostonAreaBobFan wrote:
Frankie's probably asleep. :lol:

Bingo!


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 06:47 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun December 24th, 2006, 18:12 GMT
Posts: 1849
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Glad you had a good time queen. Wish I could've been there to say hi and show you the sites in the Big Smoke. Maybe next time!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 11:15 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri July 15th, 2011, 02:23 GMT
Posts: 22853
Great to hear frompigwithoutawig and Queen. Sounds like another Dylan pleaser of a show!
Thanks!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 12:45 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue June 3rd, 2008, 11:01 GMT
Posts: 4165
Wow! Coat, ERK, Joey, Visions, Sugar... love it. He really gets it going towards the end of the tour now.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 13:35 GMT 

Joined: Mon May 25th, 2009, 06:12 GMT
Posts: 2310
Location: swimming across the pond...
i still wish with all my heart that he would switch up the last 5 songs in the list.. and put them somewhere else. Make us guess if its the last song or the encore or what.. because it is SUCH a downer to have Thunder come on.. (even though its played with enthusiasm) because you know what the next songs are going to be..and..its...over.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 13:40 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Mon September 10th, 2012, 23:07 GMT
Posts: 80
Great show with superb attendance I'd guess at least 12,000 or more. Bob was on and MK was just boring as f$ck.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 14:11 GMT 
Titanium Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue June 30th, 2009, 05:06 GMT
Posts: 8848
Location: you try to get away...they drag you back
queen of love wrote:
i still wish with all my heart that he would switch up the last 5 songs in the list.. and put them somewhere else. Make us guess if its the last song or the encore or what.. because it is SUCH a downer to have Thunder come on.. (even though its played with enthusiasm) because you know what the next songs are going to be..and..its...over.


AMEN to that - an people are still mesmerized by Thin man that's impressive i suppose!

Looks like i quit the road early this tour. really would have been nice to hear a tempest debut. In Canada, no less, who knew??


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 14:58 GMT 

Joined: Wed February 17th, 2010, 21:36 GMT
Posts: 134
http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/mu ... frustrated

Bob Dylan has sufficiently abused his audience over the years that you’d think by now even diehard fans would approach the purchase of a ticket to one of his shows with a certain degree of masochistic wariness.

There they were at the Air Canada Centre on Wednesday night, though: disgusted patrons of an age that clearly should have known better, shaking their heads and emitting disapproving clucks as they made for the exits early in a steady trickle begun before Dylan and his band had even reached the halfway mark of their 100-minute set. The vast tracts of empty seats shrouded in grey canvas on the ACC’s upper level and the roomy conditions in the rest of the bowl had seemed to suggest going in that most of the “fairweathers” were long ago weeded out by several decades’ worth of Dylan tours that have infamously waffled between uneven and outright awful, so what these frustrated individuals were expecting from the night is anybody’s guess. Whatever it was, though, they didn’t get it.

Did anybody get what they wanted from Dylan on Wednesday? Tough to say. I’m betting the old hippie dude excitedly belting out ’60s folk tunes on an acoustic guitar in the smoking area after former Dire Straits frontman Mark Knopfler’s opening set did, as probably did the scattered folks who occasionally broke the subdued mood in the stands with delighted whoops and whistles and cries of “Dylaaaaaaan!” as the night wore (wearingly) on, too.

The inebriated chap at the urinal next to me mid-set who sighed, “It would be nice if I could figure out what f------ song he’s playing” might have put forth a more representative point of view, not least because his buddy then incorrectly identified “Tangled Up In Blue” — which had already been heard a half-hour previous — as the song Dylan was at that moment playing. And not least again because none of us within earshot in the men’s washroom could be completely certain what song we were actually hearing at that moment.

Generally speaking, then, this was a crowd that never demonstrably roused itself to much more than a mild simmer of half-baffled collective bemusement, and with good reason. This was a performance that didn’t invite much more than a mild simmer of half-baffled bemusement.

For the most part, in fact, the performance itself was conducted at a mild simmer. The 71-year-old Dylan spent the bulk of it seated behind a piano at stage right, barking, braying and hoarking unintelligible linguistic formations into the microphone and banging out ill-disciplined boogie-woogie licks on the keys while his understatedly ace band — guitarists Stu Kimball and Charlie Sexton, lap- and pedal-steel guitarist Donnie Herron, bassist Tony Garnier and drummer George Receli — observed a controlled, choogling country-blues burn through such mutilated classics as “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere,” “Visions of Johanna” and “Tangled Up In Blue,” along with similarly juke-joint-worthy latter-years entries like the Oscar-winning Wonder Boys soundtrack jam “Things Have Changed” and the snarling “Early Roman Kings” from this year’s Tempest album. Knopfler came onstage to grace a few numbers with his unmistakably smooooooth guitar tones at the beginning of the set, but you’d never know it; his presence was never officially acknowledged.

Nor was the audience’s presence ever officially acknowledged, really, until Dylan coughed up a round of band introductions during a surprisingly generous stretch of hits to close out the night: “Like a Rolling Stone,” “All Along the Watchtower” and “Blowin’ In the Wind.” They weren’t exactly done by the numbers, of course, but you could discern enough recognizable patterns in Dylan’s guttural honks and bleats (“Wuzzaponnatimedrezzofine / Threwabumzadimeinnaprime / Diiin’uuu?”) to identify the source material, and the band’s stormy, storming assault on “All Along the Watchtower” was the only moment besides a raucous “Highway 61 Revisited” where the band had a chance to smash its way out of the old-timey blues box and genuinely flex some musical muscle. There you felt the same fire in the song that Jimi Hendrix must surely have felt when he covered it in 1968 and wondered where the hell it had been all night.

Maybe it’s just that the old fire finds its expression in much more subtle, convoluted and camouflaged ways through the Bob Dylan of 2012. Who knows? The man’s a bona fide enigma, and to be admired for his ability to consistently fascinate, confound and infuriate after all these years. Maybe he’s beyond pandering to audience enjoyment, even if his audience still very much longs to enjoy him.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 15:00 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Mon September 10th, 2012, 23:07 GMT
Posts: 80
He posted an article the day of the concert warning that his review would be nasty. He apparently was at a different show than the rest of us.


Last edited by Caribbean Wind on Thu November 15th, 2012, 15:28 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 15:21 GMT 

Joined: Tue October 13th, 2009, 20:44 GMT
Posts: 94
Anyone know the last it Bob played "Joey" live?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 15:27 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun January 4th, 2009, 08:02 GMT
Posts: 16219
Location: South of the mountains of Madrid.
Denny wrote:
Anyone know the last it Bob played "Joey" live?


:shock:

try here http://hisbobness.info/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 16:28 GMT 

Joined: Wed February 17th, 2010, 21:36 GMT
Posts: 134
http://www.torontosun.com/2012/11/15/dy ... s-than-hit

TORONTO - Toronto is crawling with master singer-songwriters.

And, like most folks, some have clearly aged better than others.

Wednesday night at the Air Canada Centre saw the double bill of folk-rock legend Bob Dylan and former Dire Straits frontman Mark Knopfler, which given their impressive combined back catalogue surprisingly only drew 8,000 fans, while across town Canadian folkie Gordon Lightfoot began his usual fall four-night stand at Massey Hall.

Still to come, more Canadian folk-rock gold in the form of Neil Young and his sometime band Crazy Horse on Monday night at the ACC.

But back to the matter at hand as in the one and only Dylan, 71.

Decked out in a yellow stripe-lined grey-black suit, as far as I could tell due to the dim lighting (Bob doesn’t like photos and Knopfler reportedly sat in on a few songs but I literally couldn’t see him and he wasn’t introduced) - Dylan alternated between playing piano/keyboards or just singing with his microphone and playing harmonica and even attempted a shuffling dance and smile or two.

A notoriously hit and miss performer, he was definitely more miss than hit on this particular night.

And while criticizing Dylan's vocals at this point is a little like shooting ducks in a barrel, if

you don’t want to be seen clearly, it certainly helps if you can be heard clearly.

There was no faulting the actual playing of Dylan and his five crack musicians, but it was definitely a listening challenge as the topnotch lyrics of drastically rearranged versions of such classics as Tangled Up In Blue, Visions of Johanna, Highway 61 Revisited, Like A Rolling Stone, All Along The Watchtower and Blowin’ In The Wind were delivered by Dylan in what can fairly be described as a hoarse mumble.

It was hard to tell most of the time what he was actually singing due to his exaggerated gravel-voiced delivery.

And of the material from his latest 2012 album, Tempest, he just performed Early Roman Kings, while only stopping to talk to introduce his band.

Knoplfer, 63, also went the non-crowd pleasing route but for different reasons that mainly had to due with his choice of material.

His opening hour and 20 minute set was noticeably void of Dire Straits songs except for the encore number, So Far Away.

Instead, the nimble fingered guitarist concentrated on tunes from his latest solo album, 2012’s Privateering, and other solo work in a beautiful-sounding concert soaked soundwise in his Celtic background and players that included a flute player and fiddler.

The six piece band gradually grew to seven to include an accordion player.

“We can’t take too many requests,” said the Glasgow born-Knopfler. “You know those songs you want me to play. I’m not going to play them.

And so he didn’t.

Instead, Privateering songs like Kingdom Of Gold and Marbletown stood out as Knopfler let his fingers fly and the audience finally got in on the action clapping during the latter song’s quietest moments as the fiddler and bassist played softly together.==


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 17:16 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Mon November 1st, 2004, 17:51 GMT
Posts: 1055
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Fun show, Bob's as happy as can be. Joey and Sugar Baby were terrific. Driving home sucked and working today on 3 hours sleep sucks even more. Let's do it again tomorrow!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 18:25 GMT 
Titanium Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue March 27th, 2007, 20:24 GMT
Posts: 7834
You're preachin' to the choir sister. Got home around 2am. I'm just grinding the day out unsteady and sure.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 18:27 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Thu October 11th, 2012, 17:08 GMT
Posts: 235
Location: Moncton N.B. Canada
Change of plans, was going to leave for Montreal today to see Bob but my brother wants me to stay and see Gordon Lightfoot at Massey Hall. So we're going to that and then will leave tomorrow for Montreal. Pretty cool. Got good seats too.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 20:12 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Thu October 11th, 2012, 17:08 GMT
Posts: 235
Location: Moncton N.B. Canada
Lou Reed wrote:
http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/music/article/1288081--bob-dylan-s-unintelligible-performance-at-acc-leaves-fans-critic-frustrated

Bob Dylan has sufficiently abused his audience over the years that you’d think by now even diehard fans would approach the purchase of a ticket to one of his shows with a certain degree of masochistic wariness.

There they were at the Air Canada Centre on Wednesday night, though: disgusted patrons of an age that clearly should have known better, shaking their heads and emitting disapproving clucks as they made for the exits early in a steady trickle begun before Dylan and his band had even reached the halfway mark of their 100-minute set. The vast tracts of empty seats shrouded in grey canvas on the ACC’s upper level and the roomy conditions in the rest of the bowl had seemed to suggest going in that most of the “fairweathers” were long ago weeded out by several decades’ worth of Dylan tours that have infamously waffled between uneven and outright awful, so what these frustrated individuals were expecting from the night is anybody’s guess. Whatever it was, though, they didn’t get it.

Did anybody get what they wanted from Dylan on Wednesday? Tough to say. I’m betting the old hippie dude excitedly belting out ’60s folk tunes on an acoustic guitar in the smoking area after former Dire Straits frontman Mark Knopfler’s opening set did, as probably did the scattered folks who occasionally broke the subdued mood in the stands with delighted whoops and whistles and cries of “Dylaaaaaaan!” as the night wore (wearingly) on, too.

The inebriated chap at the urinal next to me mid-set who sighed, “It would be nice if I could figure out what f------ song he’s playing” might have put forth a more representative point of view, not least because his buddy then incorrectly identified “Tangled Up In Blue” — which had already been heard a half-hour previous — as the song Dylan was at that moment playing. And not least again because none of us within earshot in the men’s washroom could be completely certain what song we were actually hearing at that moment.

Generally speaking, then, this was a crowd that never demonstrably roused itself to much more than a mild simmer of half-baffled collective bemusement, and with good reason. This was a performance that didn’t invite much more than a mild simmer of half-baffled bemusement.

For the most part, in fact, the performance itself was conducted at a mild simmer. The 71-year-old Dylan spent the bulk of it seated behind a piano at stage right, barking, braying and hoarking unintelligible linguistic formations into the microphone and banging out ill-disciplined boogie-woogie licks on the keys while his understatedly ace band — guitarists Stu Kimball and Charlie Sexton, lap- and pedal-steel guitarist Donnie Herron, bassist Tony Garnier and drummer George Receli — observed a controlled, choogling country-blues burn through such mutilated classics as “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere,” “Visions of Johanna” and “Tangled Up In Blue,” along with similarly juke-joint-worthy latter-years entries like the Oscar-winning Wonder Boys soundtrack jam “Things Have Changed” and the snarling “Early Roman Kings” from this year’s Tempest album. Knopfler came onstage to grace a few numbers with his unmistakably smooooooth guitar tones at the beginning of the set, but you’d never know it; his presence was never officially acknowledged.

Nor was the audience’s presence ever officially acknowledged, really, until Dylan coughed up a round of band introductions during a surprisingly generous stretch of hits to close out the night: “Like a Rolling Stone,” “All Along the Watchtower” and “Blowin’ In the Wind.” They weren’t exactly done by the numbers, of course, but you could discern enough recognizable patterns in Dylan’s guttural honks and bleats (“Wuzzaponnatimedrezzofine / Threwabumzadimeinnaprime / Diiin’uuu?”) to identify the source material, and the band’s stormy, storming assault on “All Along the Watchtower” was the only moment besides a raucous “Highway 61 Revisited” where the band had a chance to smash its way out of the old-timey blues box and genuinely flex some musical muscle. There you felt the same fire in the song that Jimi Hendrix must surely have felt when he covered it in 1968 and wondered where the hell it had been all night.

Maybe it’s just that the old fire finds its expression in much more subtle, convoluted and camouflaged ways through the Bob Dylan of 2012. Who knows? The man’s a bona fide enigma, and to be admired for his ability to consistently fascinate, confound and infuriate after all these years. Maybe he’s beyond pandering to audience enjoyment, even if his audience still very much longs to enjoy him.

TO PUT THIS IN PERSPECTIVE, HE WROTE THIS BEFORE THE SHOW!!! Every music critic’s got a few black spots, so a confession: Bob Dylan is one of mine.

Get a head start on drafting your angry “letters to the editor” about whatever purist-infuriating review might come out of the man’s Toronto date at the Air Canada Centre Wednesday night, then, because I’m the uninformed idiot who’ll be writing it. Not from a willfully ignorant or antagonistic point of view, I hasten to add, but from the point of view of a lifelong pop-music scholar — one whose pop scholarship has been conducted for the past 17 years in a “professional” capacity — who just never properly “clicked” with Dylan.

In no way do those statements mean I deny the genius Dylan has infallibly displayed — even and, as some acolytes would no doubt argue, especially through intermittent interludes of popular bafflement — for the past 50 years, nor that I diminish the epochal role he and his forward-thinking songwriting played in ushering every single musical contemporary they touched, not to mention rock ’n’ roll in general, towards prototypical artistic “maturity” during the 1960s because that would be tantamount to denying that our sun is the closest star to the earth.

When I say I’ve never clicked with Dylan, it just means that I was 6 months old when Blood on the Tracks came out and was subsequently too far gone in other directions when, 10 years later, someone put the Jesus and Mary Chain’s Psychocandy, Love and Rockets’ Seventh Dream of Teenage Heaven and C.S. Angels’ Chasing Shadows in my hands at far too early an age and propelled me into realms of taste far beyond my dad’s Bruce Springsteen and Chris DeBurgh LPs, let alone Empire Burlesque or Knocked Out Loaded or whatever weirdness our man Bob was up to at the time. There was a lot of diligent backtracking afterwards, of course, but for some reason — beyond a very real infatuation with “Talkin’ Bear Mountain Picnic Massacre Blues” and a habit of terrorizing the rummies at the Chateau Lafayette jukebox with as many consecutive jukebox runs at Blonde on Blonde’s 11:23 “Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands” as it took to get the machine unplugged during my time at Carleton University during the early ’90s — I was never compelled to wind the clock back to obsess on, say, Highway 61 Revisited the way I was on Axis: Bold as Love, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn or The Velvet Underground and Nico.

This lack of Dylan-ist knowledge thus seems a bit of a character flaw heading into tonight’s Air Canada Centre show. I do know this, though: a hopelessly unscientific survey of the past five Tempest tour set lists as posted on www.boblinks.com suggests some consistency to the program, which should assist a rank Dylan amateur such as I in papering over some of the gaps in my knowledge. SO KIND OF A POINTLESS REVIEW IN MY OPINION!!!!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 20:15 GMT 

Joined: Wed February 17th, 2010, 21:36 GMT
Posts: 134
http://arts.nationalpost.com/2012/11/15 ... da-centre/

What could possibly compel a person to walk out of a Bob Dylan concert before it was finished? An early morning meeting? A parking meter about to expire? The insatiable desire to nab a plum seat on the GO Train home?

Maybe the crowd who assembled at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre last night was expecting a show along the lines of the ones we get from Dylan’s legendary contemporaries: Paul McCartney’s freakishly perfect health makes him robust enough to sing his way through a note-perfect, three-hour extravaganza featuring almost every Beatles and Wings tune you’d want to hear, while the timid and fragile Brian Wilson relies heavily on a 13-piece backing band to conjure a nightly hit parade of Beach Boys classics.

Any self-respecting rock ‘n’ roll fan should know that pandering has never been Bob Dylan’s style. But after a Celtic-heavy opening set by Mark Knopfler, the Toronto crowd seemed to be expecting something far different than what they got, and their largely nonplussed reaction (and the multitude of premature walkouts) sent a loud and clear message to music’s Most Important Person of the last 100 years: they were not impressed.

On the other hand, maybe the lukewarm reception had nothing to do with the crowd’s expectations, and everything to do with the fact that the now 71-year old icon has essentially lost the ability to sing. His once nasal tones have degenerated into a deep and gravelly cackle, and Dylan is now clearly incapable of making his greatest works, Like A Rolling Stone and Blowin’ In the Wind in particular, sound anything like they would have in 1966.

It was using this gruff cadence, spitting out lyrics like “Johanna!” like gobs of chewing tobacco, that Dylan led his backing band through a reliably bluesy set, the same staunchly traditionalist approach he’s been mining for at least the last ten years. Seemingly puzzled by it all, the crowd reacted to the rambling jam-outs of Rollin’ and Tumblin’ and Highway 61 Revisited as if they were wastes of valuable time. As for what they thought of Early Roman Kings, off Dylan’s acclaimed new record Tempest? Fuhgeddaboudit.

Maybe the lukewarm reception had nothing to do with the crowd’s expectations, and everything to do with the fact that the now 71-year old icon has essentially lost the ability to sing

But these “difficult” moments were tempered by a variety of obvious highlights, mostly when Dylan left his piano to stalk his way across the stage with mic in hand. He busted out energetic harmonica solos on Things Have Changed and Tangled Up in Blue, and brilliantly channeled the threatening vibe of Ballad of a Thin Man with an eerie, echoing vocal effect and dramatic, ringing guitars. The show’s most memorable moment was the heartfelt run through the rarely played 1976 gangster ode Joey. Perhaps selected for the way it still fits Dylan’s limited range, the song was a testament to the sheer depths of his catalogue. Few artists can reach deep into the past and grab hold of songs so rich and satisfying.

Today’s nostalgia-fuelled, Live Nation-controlled concert industry has bet its lush profit margins upon the notion that the customer is always right. But that flawed philosophy doesn’t apply to the most enigmatic artist of our time. Still challenging his listeners, even in his advanced age, Bob Dylan refuses to see the world through rose-coloured, ‘60s-inspired glasses.

The Verdict: His voice is in shambles, and his setlist wasn’t chock full of hits. But anyone claiming Bob Dylan didn’t give enough to earn the price of admission displays a disappointing lack of both respect and, more importantly, good taste.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 20:28 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Thu October 11th, 2012, 17:08 GMT
Posts: 235
Location: Moncton N.B. Canada
Lou Reed wrote:
http://arts.nationalpost.com/2012/11/15/concert-review-bob-dylan-gave-it-his-all-though-that-isnt-much-these-days-at-the-air-canada-centre/

What could possibly compel a person to walk out of a Bob Dylan concert before it was finished? An early morning meeting? A parking meter about to expire? The insatiable desire to nab a plum seat on the GO Train home?

Maybe the crowd who assembled at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre last night was expecting a show along the lines of the ones we get from Dylan’s legendary contemporaries: Paul McCartney’s freakishly perfect health makes him robust enough to sing his way through a note-perfect, three-hour extravaganza featuring almost every Beatles and Wings tune you’d want to hear, while the timid and fragile Brian Wilson relies heavily on a 13-piece backing band to conjure a nightly hit parade of Beach Boys classics.

Any self-respecting rock ‘n’ roll fan should know that pandering has never been Bob Dylan’s style. But after a Celtic-heavy opening set by Mark Knopfler, the Toronto crowd seemed to be expecting something far different than what they got, and their largely nonplussed reaction (and the multitude of premature walkouts) sent a loud and clear message to music’s Most Important Person of the last 100 years: they were not impressed.

On the other hand, maybe the lukewarm reception had nothing to do with the crowd’s expectations, and everything to do with the fact that the now 71-year old icon has essentially lost the ability to sing. His once nasal tones have degenerated into a deep and gravelly cackle, and Dylan is now clearly incapable of making his greatest works, Like A Rolling Stone and Blowin’ In the Wind in particular, sound anything like they would have in 1966.

It was using this gruff cadence, spitting out lyrics like “Johanna!” like gobs of chewing tobacco, that Dylan led his backing band through a reliably bluesy set, the same staunchly traditionalist approach he’s been mining for at least the last ten years. Seemingly puzzled by it all, the crowd reacted to the rambling jam-outs of Rollin’ and Tumblin’ and Highway 61 Revisited as if they were wastes of valuable time. As for what they thought of Early Roman Kings, off Dylan’s acclaimed new record Tempest? Fuhgeddaboudit.

Maybe the lukewarm reception had nothing to do with the crowd’s expectations, and everything to do with the fact that the now 71-year old icon has essentially lost the ability to sing

But these “difficult” moments were tempered by a variety of obvious highlights, mostly when Dylan left his piano to stalk his way across the stage with mic in hand. He busted out energetic harmonica solos on Things Have Changed and Tangled Up in Blue, and brilliantly channeled the threatening vibe of Ballad of a Thin Man with an eerie, echoing vocal effect and dramatic, ringing guitars. The show’s most memorable moment was the heartfelt run through the rarely played 1976 gangster ode Joey. Perhaps selected for the way it still fits Dylan’s limited range, the song was a testament to the sheer depths of his catalogue. Few artists can reach deep into the past and grab hold of songs so rich and satisfying.

Today’s nostalgia-fuelled, Live Nation-controlled concert industry has bet its lush profit margins upon the notion that the customer is always right. But that flawed philosophy doesn’t apply to the most enigmatic artist of our time. Still challenging his listeners, even in his advanced age, Bob Dylan refuses to see the world through rose-coloured, ‘60s-inspired glasses.

The Verdict: His voice is in shambles, and his setlist wasn’t chock full of hits. But anyone claiming Bob Dylan didn’t give enough to earn the price of admission displays a disappointing lack of both respect and, more importantly, good taste.
I have to agree with an awful lot of what you say Lou. Also Paul "I'm the Beatles" McCartney does not do 100 shows a year. I thought Bob did fine for his age and I was not disappointed and knew exactly what to expect. It can't be easy to play, blow his harp, and dance around at his age. Roll on Bob.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 21:47 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue June 26th, 2012, 21:00 GMT
Posts: 2088
Does anybody know if Bob changed the words in ERK to "tomorrow is thursday?"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 21:50 GMT 
Titanium Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 18th, 2009, 08:46 GMT
Posts: 5506
Location: Twin Peaks
Yes. He didn't.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu November 15th, 2012, 21:56 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Thu October 11th, 2012, 17:08 GMT
Posts: 235
Location: Moncton N.B. Canada
pigwithoutawig wrote:
Lou Reed wrote:
http://arts.nationalpost.com/2012/11/15/concert-review-bob-dylan-gave-it-his-all-though-that-isnt-much-these-days-at-the-air-canada-centre/

What could possibly compel a person to walk out of a Bob Dylan concert before it was finished? An early morning meeting? A parking meter about to expire? The insatiable desire to nab a plum seat on the GO Train home?

Maybe the crowd who assembled at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre last night was expecting a show along the lines of the ones we get from Dylan’s legendary contemporaries: Paul McCartney’s freakishly perfect health makes him robust enough to sing his way through a note-perfect, three-hour extravaganza featuring almost every Beatles and Wings tune you’d want to hear, while the timid and fragile Brian Wilson relies heavily on a 13-piece backing band to conjure a nightly hit parade of Beach Boys classics.

Any self-respecting rock ‘n’ roll fan should know that pandering has never been Bob Dylan’s style. But after a Celtic-heavy opening set by Mark Knopfler, the Toronto crowd seemed to be expecting something far different than what they got, and their largely nonplussed reaction (and the multitude of premature walkouts) sent a loud and clear message to music’s Most Important Person of the last 100 years: they were not impressed.

On the other hand, maybe the lukewarm reception had nothing to do with the crowd’s expectations, and everything to do with the fact that the now 71-year old icon has essentially lost the ability to sing. His once nasal tones have degenerated into a deep and gravelly cackle, and Dylan is now clearly incapable of making his greatest works, Like A Rolling Stone and Blowin’ In the Wind in particular, sound anything like they would have in 1966.

It was using this gruff cadence, spitting out lyrics like “Johanna!” like gobs of chewing tobacco, that Dylan led his backing band through a reliably bluesy set, the same staunchly traditionalist approach he’s been mining for at least the last ten years. Seemingly puzzled by it all, the crowd reacted to the rambling jam-outs of Rollin’ and Tumblin’ and Highway 61 Revisited as if they were wastes of valuable time. As for what they thought of Early Roman Kings, off Dylan’s acclaimed new record Tempest? Fuhgeddaboudit.

Maybe the lukewarm reception had nothing to do with the crowd’s expectations, and everything to do with the fact that the now 71-year old icon has essentially lost the ability to sing

But these “difficult” moments were tempered by a variety of obvious highlights, mostly when Dylan left his piano to stalk his way across the stage with mic in hand. He busted out energetic harmonica solos on Things Have Changed and Tangled Up in Blue, and brilliantly channeled the threatening vibe of Ballad of a Thin Man with an eerie, echoing vocal effect and dramatic, ringing guitars. The show’s most memorable moment was the heartfelt run through the rarely played 1976 gangster ode Joey. Perhaps selected for the way it still fits Dylan’s limited range, the song was a testament to the sheer depths of his catalogue. Few artists can reach deep into the past and grab hold of songs so rich and satisfying.

Today’s nostalgia-fuelled, Live Nation-controlled concert industry has bet its lush profit margins upon the notion that the customer is always right. But that flawed philosophy doesn’t apply to the most enigmatic artist of our time. Still challenging his listeners, even in his advanced age, Bob Dylan refuses to see the world through rose-coloured, ‘60s-inspired glasses.

The Verdict: His voice is in shambles, and his setlist wasn’t chock full of hits. But anyone claiming Bob Dylan didn’t give enough to earn the price of admission displays a disappointing lack of both respect and, more importantly, good taste.
I have to agree with an awful lot of what you say Lou. Also Paul "I'm the Beatles" McCartney does not do 100 shows a year. I thought Bob did fine for his age and I was not disappointed and knew exactly what to expect. It can't be easy to play, blow his harp, and dance around at his age. Roll on Bob.
Sorry Lou, I didn't realize it was a review from the National Post. But thanks for posting it. I still agree with a lot of it.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 259 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group