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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 08:18 GMT 
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http://news.cnet.com/8301-13645_3-20018 ... =mncol;txt


October 6, 2010 11:29 AM PDT
Bob Dylan's mono recordings, 1962-1967
by Steve Guttenberg

"The Original Mono Recordings" box set features Bob Dylan's first eight albums, available on CD and in their original release format, mono LPs (and on MP3, sans box). The set runs from his first album, "Bob Dylan," released in March 1962, to "John Wesley Harding" from late December 1967. At that time most people listened to Dylan's music over mono AM radios in the car, mono portable radios, or mono home hi-fi systems. Sure, stereo Dylan LPs were simultaneously released with the monos, but it's my best guess that Dylan and his production team listened to the mono mixes in the studio. Besides, mono LPs retailed for $2.98 in the early 1960s, and stereo LPs were a buck more, so most kids bought the mono, even if they had a stereo (that would include me). "John Wesley Harding" was the last mono LP from Dylan; after that all subsequent American releases were stereo only. So unless you have original 1960s-era LPs, chances are you've never heard the mono mixes.

I spoke with reissue producer Steve Berkowitz to get more details about how the transfers were done. He assured me the 96/kHz-24-bit resolution digital masters were made from the original analog master tapes, played on vintage mono tape machines, and that the LPs were cut directly from the analog masters. I was relieved to hear that; most, no, nearly all newly recorded or remastered old analog music that comes out on LP is sourced from digital masters. "The Original Mono Recordings" on LP are pure analog discs, with no digital conversions whatsoever in the mastering process. The LPs were cut here in NYC at Sterling Sound by George Marino, a true master of the record-cutting lathe.

Berkowitz stressed the guiding principle for everyone involved, including engineer Mark Wilder and producer Jeff Rosen, was to make the new LPs sound as close to the first generation American LPs as possible. Berkowitz said, "We went back and forth comparing the new mono LPs and CDs with the original LPs. They were the 'masters' we served to replicate."

The stereo versions of Dylan's music sound fine, but as Berkowitz put it, "Up until the Beatles released "Sgt. Pepper," mono was the real production format, and stereo was an idea to comply with." I'm usually a stereo guy, but I have to admit that the single CD advance copy of "The Best of The Original Mono Recordings" convinced me, at least for Dylan, of the mono mixes' superiority. The differences aren't subtle.

The first three albums, "Bob Dylan," "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan," and "The Times They Are A-Changin'" stereo mixes are the worst "offenders" in that Dylan's vocal is centered, his guitar is all the way over on the right, and harmonica on the left. The mono mixes unite the vocal, guitar and harmonica in the center, and tonally sound richer and more natural. When Dylan started working with larger groups of musicians the mono mixes are no less interesting, and I was shocked by how much better "Like A Rolling Stone," from "Highway 61 Revisited" sounded in mono. The drums, bass and guitar in the mono mix are louder, so it sounds more rock and roll in mono. "Tombstone Blues" told the same story; the stereo versions are much thinner and the stereo separation feels disjointed after you hear the mono. The mono mixes aren't all superior; I prefer the stereo version of "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35"; the mono seems a little closed-in and cramped by comparison. All in all, the mono mixes are better, so chances are I'll be putting the stereo versions in retirement.

"The Original Mono Recordings" box sets of 180-gram LPs or CDs are both accompanied by a beautifully illustrated booklet, featuring vintage photographs of Dylan and an essay from my favorite living rock critic, Greil Marcus.

Columbia Records will release Bob Dylan's "The Bootleg Series Volume 9--The Witmark Demos," "Bob Dylan--The Original Mono Recordings," and the single CD "The Best of The Original Mono Recordings" on October 19. Amazon is throwing in (for free) "Bob Dylan: In Concert, Brandeis University, 1963," an extremely rare and newly discovered Bob Dylan live concert CD to customers who preorder "The Bootleg Series Vol. 9" or "The Original Mono Recordings" on CD or vinyl.

Sundazed has offered mono Dylan LPs for years, but I haven't heard them, so I can't comment on which sounds better


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 12:26 GMT 
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Wow! This seems worth the wonga all of a sudden!


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 12:35 GMT 

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Dare I ask what a wonga is?

Cockney rhyming slang for something like money?


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 13:18 GMT 
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Great link! I'm even more excited about this release now... The main disc I was looking forward to on October 19th (out of all the releases) was the mono Highway 61, and it looks like this reviewer gave it a clear thumbs-up! Good low-end and it sounding more "rock n' roll" are exactly what I'd want. Too bad this guy never listened to the Sundazed as a point of comparison.


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 14:58 GMT 
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I just checked eBay and below is a complete set of original mono vinyl with prices (about half are "Buy it now") to give you a sense of how affordable it is to skip all the reissues that try so hard to sound exactly like the original LPs and go to the source and get the original LPs.

Debut LP $30 http://cgi.ebay.com/BOB-DYLAN-self-titl ... 2a08cad0d2

Freewheelin’ original mono, $5: http://cgi.ebay.com/BOB-DYLAN-LP-Freewh ... 588a3e1ed0

Times mono UK 1st Press $9 http://cgi.ebay.com/BOB-DYLAN-TIMES-CHA ... 20b428f8d9

Another Side $4 http://cgi.ebay.com/Bob-Dylan-Another-S ... 35acef68df

BIABH $14 http://cgi.ebay.com/Bob-DYLAN-Bringing- ... 483cd0161b


H61R $7 http://cgi.ebay.com/BOB-DYLAN-HIGHWAY-6 ... 230a9fa7f3

BOB $10 http://cgi.ebay.com/Bob-Dylan-Blonde-Bl ... 3cb13907c8

Greatest Hits w/poster $7 http://cgi.ebay.com/BOB-DYLANS-GREATEST ... 3cb14fb409

JWH $25 http://cgi.ebay.com/BOB-DYLAN-JOHN-WESL ... 519586b5c1


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 15:10 GMT 
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CD GENERATION


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 15:41 GMT 
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VINYL GENERATION.

However, when the first batch of those SACD hybrid Dylan CDs came out I bought the box set and then sold almost all my original Dylan vinyl because those CDs sound great to me.


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 16:31 GMT 
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How do they get the little hole in the middle of them?


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 18:14 GMT 
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They hire the specialists who drill the holes into the donuts and retrain them in 6-month courses. The donut industry is in series trouble because of the drain on their skilled workforce.


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 19:21 GMT 

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Mister.Jones wrote:
How do they get the little hole in the middle of them?


Image


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 19:31 GMT 

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Long Johnny wrote:
VINYL GENERATION.

However, when the first batch of those SACD hybrid Dylan CDs came out I bought the box set and then sold almost all my original Dylan vinyl because those CDs sound great to me.

Is there some reason to think these ones won't sound great as well?


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PostPosted: Thu October 7th, 2010, 19:42 GMT 
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The Mighty Monkey Of Mim wrote:
Long Johnny wrote:
VINYL GENERATION.

However, when the first batch of those SACD hybrid Dylan CDs came out I bought the box set and then sold almost all my original Dylan vinyl because those CDs sound great to me.

Is there some reason to think these ones won't sound great as well?


No. But there's some reason to suggest that the people who are buying the vinyl mono reissues - Columbia or Sundazed - should buy the original mono LPs instead. Tracking down affordable copies of each Dylan LP takes more time, but buying each one and actually spending some time listening to it before you find your original mono copy of the next one, and then spending time listening to it before you... and so on, has some real merits to it. It also resists the kind of urges that boil up when you start screaming at the computer because it's been a whole twelve seconds and the Youtube video hasn't loaded yet.

Music should be fun. The time spent tracking down original mono copies of the Dylan LPs originally released in mono is fun. Getting obsessed with a specific album -- like my friend JJ's obsession with Freewheelin' -- and slowly acquiring 30, 50, 80 copies of it, is fun for your friends. The first thing my friend John does when he visits is go and count the number of mono Sgt Pepper LPs in the crate by the door (14 right now). When we finally hit 90 and fall over dead it will all feel as if it took about 20 minutes from start to finish so why not have some fun?


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 01:25 GMT 
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The reporter gets access to the mixing team and -- whattaya know! -- gives the project a blowjob. Funny how that works out.


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 06:40 GMT 
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Just wait 'til you hear 'em on Blu-ray!


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 08:28 GMT 
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SquareTotemPole wrote:
Dare I ask what a wonga is?

Cockney rhyming slang for something like money?



Wonga (although it's origin is New Zealand), spondoolicks, folding, AND:

bob shilling [A bob was a money collection where participants put in a shilling each, usually for drinks. The expression then arose "to get your two bob's worth" which meant something was very good value, Aussies being fond of the occasional ale.
grand £1000
monkey £500
pony £25
tanner sixpence. from India - a rupee was about equal to a shilling, and was divided into sixteen annas. so half a rupee was "eight anna" - say it fast. or in Hindi, it's "aat anna". makes you jump when you hear it in India!
tenner £10 [Also known as a Paul McKenna (famous hypnotist).
tilbury sixpence
score £20 (Rhyming slang reference is apple core - see rhyming slang pages)
Oxford 5 shillings or a crown [derived from Oxford Scholar which rhymes with dollar which, pre-war, was just under 5 shillings Also known as Coachwheel]
'alf an Oxford 2 shillings & 6 pence or half a crown
Nicker or Quid £1 [ Also, the rhyming slang Bin Lid is used for quid -
Readies (Nelson Eddy's) Pound note [ Actually I believe "reddies" refers to £50 notes which are of course red. This term can be used to describe any amount of money. A traditional term for cash is "ready money" a term still used on Smithfield market. I would suggest that this is where the term "reddies" comes from. The term Nelsons refers to money generally, so a lot of nelsons is a lot of money]
Ton £100
Century £100 [ the expression C-Note, which he believes is American ]
Skin Diver (or Deep Sea Diver or Sky Diver or Scuba Diver or Pam Shriver) fiver [Lend us a deep sea 'til payday. n]
Sprarsy Anna Tanner (sixpence) [Lend us a sprarsy. . he wonders if Sprarsy might have something to do with the old Indian coin called an "anna". If you have any more info please let me know]
Bullseye £50
Wicker Basket £15. Neal says he's not sure of the origin although it has been suggested that it has something to do with flower sellers and Jack the Ripper (?).
Lady Godiva £5 (fiver). [Usage - 'ere, can you spare a lady?" ]
Ayrton Senna £10 (tenner). Also known as Louise Wener. See the rhyming slang tables. [Thanks to Jon Lord. Tom Good reports that he's also heard the phrase "Dead Brazilian" used, as in "I pulled a dead Brazilian out of me sky rocket"]
Plenty £20
Thrifty £50 [
One-er £100 [Pronounced "wunner". ]
Mother Hen £10
Archer £2000 [Based on the (alleged) amount Lord Jeffery Archer handed a prostitute, can't remember why but there was (again, allegedly) something dodgy about it. ]
Nugget £1 [Apparently because it's golden coloured. Thanks to Oliver Campion. Also known as Canary or Yellow-Boy. a yellow-boy, which is slang for guinea, is actually worth one pound, one shilling. I should note that when the guinea was originally struck in 1663 it was actually worth one pound - it wasn't until 1717 that the value was raised.]
Plum £100,000
Squid Quid [ commonly used in Reading]
Cock and Hen £10 [ cockle is commonly used, as in "lend us a cockle".]
Wedge Comes from when coins could be split into quarters so exact weights could be measured. The shape of these sections was a wedge.
Bottle £2 or £200 from 'bottle of glue' -> two]
Carpet £3 or £300 [Tprisoners used to get a square of carpet after being locked up for three years]
Rofe £4 or £400 (supposedly four backwards)
Jacks Alive £5
Tom Mix £6
Nevis £7 (Seven backwards)
Poorly Fish Six quid (sick squid) [- sounds like more of a bad pun than slang but ... Tom reports that the reference he knows is "dead octopus" as in "I've only been here 5 minutes and I've done a dead octopus". the expression "dodgy octopus" is also used.]
Pavarotti (tenor) Tenner - £10 [ Also referred to as a Lucy, ]
Rocket £5 - from the picture of George Stevenson's rocket on the five pound note -
Commodore £15 - how odd...this one derives from the fact that the Commodores sang "Three Times a Lady" (Lady Godiva - fiver)
Nifty £50 [Nifty - Fifty. ]
Bag of Sand £1000 (grand) [
Bernie £1,000,000 [Refers to Bernie Ecclestone of Formula One fame who donated one million pounds to the Labour election campaign - t
Jackson £5 [From the Jackson Five - t]
Long 'un £100 [Thanks to Dean Willingham]
Bag (of sand) £1000 [Bag of Sand -> Grand.
Dirty £30 [Thanks to Stuart McHugh]
Ching £5 [From the Spanish cinco perhaps.
Maggie One pound coin - As in Maggie Thatcher (under whose premiership they were introduced, I believe), because "They're brassy and think they're a sovereign."
McGiver £5 [From the popular TV series -
Melvin £5 [From Howard Melvin and the Bluenotes -
Browny £10
Edge Pence 20p [From the shape of the coin - ]
McGarret £50 [From the Hawaii-50 television series. the expression 'Jack Lord' is also used.]
Bar £1,000,000 [ it's commonly used in the money markets and thinks the origin might have originated with the value of a bar of gold - uncertain. Ben Morton offers: I suggest it's because there's a bar on top of the "M" in its roman numeral equivalent. William Foot believes it should be £10,000,000.00. I]
Alan £1 [From Alan Wicker - ]
Spanner 50p [Source might be due to the shape of the 50p - Thanks to Lee Newman. Chris offers the following "supporting evidence": Why does a fifty pence piece have flat sides? So you can use a spanner to get 'em out of a Scotsman's/ Aberdonian's/Yorkshireman's hand.]
Bobby Moore Score (i.e. £20) [Thanks to Paul Island]
Beer Token £2 coin [Andy M says that when they first appeared, a bear cost about £2]
Hampden Roar (Score) £20 [Thanks to Gary Robertson]
Cenny (century) £100 [Thanks to Gary Robertson]
Elsie Sixpence [from Coronation Streets Elsie Tanner - thanks to Carol]
Flag £5 [Thanks to Sparky James and Brian Spencer - Brian notes that £5 notes were at one time very large - this might explain the reference]
Garden Gate £8 [Thanks to Ian Crossley]
Taxi Driver Fiver - £5 {Thanks to David]
Joey Please look on the Questions page (link at the top of this page).
Shrapnel Refers to loose change [Thanks to Bruce Richardson]
Sheets General term for paper money [Thanks to Pete Orme]
Yard £1,000,000,000. [Thanks to George McLean who explains that each '000' is a foot, three feet equal one yard. Similarly, it could be a yard of yen or any other currency. Richard Stanton points out that yard is probably short for milliard, meaning 1 billion]
Dosh Any sort of money [Thanks to Lisl]
Double Nugget £2 coin [Thanks to Richard Sisson]
Bluey £5 [Because of the bills colour. Thanks to Stuart Bassett]
Charred £5 [He says that the ink on the notes often get burnt during manufacture. Thanks to Stuart Bassett]
Bertie £30 [Thanks to Stuart Bassett. Gerry Gavigan says this comes from the musical hall song "Burlington Bertie" (a tramp living in Burlington arcade in Knightsbridge) I'm Burlington Bertie I rise at ten thirty"]
Huckleberry Hound £1 [Thanks to Willie Mackay]
Bender Sixpence. I believe it got its name because real ones had a certain silver content and bending them was a way of proving this. It also led to the phrase 'going on a bender' which was a good night out drinking a whole sixpence worth! [Thanks to Peter Gazeley]
Grubby Hand £1,000 (grand) [Thanks to Jim Knight whose granddad says this expression was used in East London from Victorian times to the 1940's or 1950's.
Drinking Voucher Any denomination, the value determined by the colour - a "blue drinking voucher" would be £5 [Thanks to Nick]
Purple £20 [Thanks to Paul Brister]
Bucket of Sand £1,000 (grand) [Thanks to Andrew Tough]
Spot Each pound of a group - a ten spot would be £10, a twenty spot would be £20. [Thanks to John Lines who says this is commonly used - the spot indicates the decimal point]
Jake £5 [Thanks to Talktoi]
In the Green £25 [outer circle of the bull's eye - thanks to John Campbelton]
Heptagonal Bad Boy Another name for a twenty pence piece, used in pubs and bars for things like pool table and table football, though less so now since they usually are more expensive [Thanks to Daniel Dockery]
Spit Roast £25 [Thanks to Will who confusingly notes "because its two ayrtons and a lady"]
Stretch Tenner = 1stretch, 20 = 2 stretch, 50 = 5 stretch, etc. [Thanks to John who heard this on Commercial Road - the reference here is to prison terms]
Edge Pences 50p [Thanks to Paul Madgwick]
Half a Bar 50p [Thanks to Sig]
Sov or Sov's £1 [Short for sovereigns - Thanks to Ray Norgate]
Henry £10 [Russ says a tenner is called a Henry because of the picture on it and that an eighth of marijuana is called a henry because it costs a tenner. Matt completely disagrees with Russ - an eighth of marijuana is called a henry after Henry VIII, not because of the cost.]
Desmond £4 [Desmond Tutu (2 2) - thanks to Jeremy Adam]
String of Ponies Half a monkey (£250) - thanks to Wik
Emperor Ming Money in general [Rhymes with ka-ching (sound of a cash register). Thanks to Michelle Chiles]
Dartboard £2 coin [Because of the concentric circles in its design = Thanks to Rob Jones]
Super Nugget £2 [Origin unknown - Thanks to Martin Tilley]
Maggie £1 coin [From the eighties, of the then new gold-coloured one-pound coin, because, it was said, 'it's brassy, two-faced and thinks it's a sovereign' (the then Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, had a noticeable tendency to mimic some of the more regal characteristics of Her Majesty). Ivor Randle confirms: "As I recall, for a short while the then new pound coin was called a "Maggie" after Prime Minister of the time Margaret Thatcher, because it is "small and brassy, and thinks it's a sovereign"."]
Money that folds In general, all paper money. [Thanks to Tom Mathias]
Joes Thrupenny bit (3p) [Thanks to Toad]
Round Money Generally, coins [Thanks to Edward Williams]
Ten Bob Bit The new 50p coin [Thanks to Steve Bonnage]
Gorilla (Grilla) £1000 [According to Russell Holden, it's called this because it's two monkeys]
Brownie I understand that Ten Shillings (50p) - (Ten Bob) was a 'Brownie' because the old ten shilling note was coloured brown [Thanks to Geoff Richards-Bray]
Cherry £1 - In the '60s I was a craps dealer in London gambling clubs. Cockney 'cabbies' would play at our table, and call bets before the dice rolled. One night one of them handed me a 'fiver' with the words:" A 'Cherry' on the line mate!" I asked what he meant, and he quickly explained that he wanted £1.00 out of the fiver on the 'Win Line' 'Cherry' is short for 'Cherry Picker' which rhymes with 'nicker' which = £1.00! [Thanks to Tony Pirkis]
Groat four pence [There's lots of information at http://www.tclayton.demon.co.uk/fourd.html [Thanks to Nigel Lines]
Point £1 billion [Mark says this is used in the B of E and the European money markets - never really come up in my day to day]
Large £1000 [Thanks to Benjamin Rumble]
Rio £1000 [Thanks to Paul Page who says it comes from the Rio Grande River]
Pinky £50 [Thanks to Scott Hobson. If anyone know the origin of this please let me know.]
Tosheroon Half crown [Thanks to Sue Allen who read this in Sidney Day's London Born]
I was being asked very often where the terms "monkey" and "pony" came from. I've received the following which hopefully clears this question up.

Stephen Cheshire has provided the following: With reference to a 'monkey' for £500. I was once told that it came from soldiers returning from India where the 500 rupee note had a picture of a monkey on it. They used the term monkey for 500 rupees and on returning to England the saying was converted for sterling to mean £500.

This has been confirmed by Jason Beckett who also believes that the 25 rupee note had a picture of a pony on it.

Mathew Jackson confirms this.

Ian Crossley says: Pony comes from the time when five pound notes were white and the cost of horses or ponies and the wedding carriage and the main expenses was approx £25. People used to say "I'll pay for the pony in white", referring to the colour of the money and the wedding. Therefore five white fivers became a pony roughly the cost of a wedding.

On the other hand, Henry Charles believes the references come from diamond mining , where a monkey means 50 carats and pony 100 carats, modified to mean £50 and £100 respectively.


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 09:37 GMT 
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I have the only thing money can't buy - poverty.


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 10:08 GMT 
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Don't worry. Having money only makes being miserable more comfortable.


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 11:55 GMT 
Bennyboy wrote:
I have the only thing money can't buy - poverty.
How can you be in poverty? I gave you a ton and a deep sea dead Brazilian only earlier this week...


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 12:50 GMT 
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Lars1966 wrote:
Bennyboy wrote:
I have the only thing money can't buy - poverty.
How can you be in poverty? I gave you a ton and a deep sea dead Brazilian only earlier this week...


Oh yeah me old china, so you did. But have you seen the price of sarnies in central London? My local Eat and Pret only accept platinum Amex.....


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 16:06 GMT 

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No-one seems to ask/know. What if you have the Sundazed editions? Will it be worthwhile getting these mono CDs or wait for Sony to come out with vinyl? Also, very good needledrops of the Sundazed have been circulated. Will these be any better. (This is only subjective)
I'm only waiting for the price to drop to something nearer reality.


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 18:32 GMT 
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stephenoxford wrote:
SquareTotemPole wrote:
Dare I ask what a wonga is?

Cockney rhyming slang for something like money?



Wonga (although it's origin is New Zealand), spondoolicks, folding, AND:

bob shilling [A bob was a money collection where participants put in a shilling each, usually for drinks. The expression then arose "to get your two bob's worth" which meant something was very good value, Aussies being fond of the occasional ale.
grand £1000
monkey £500
pony £25
tanner sixpence. from India - a rupee was about equal to a shilling, and was divided into sixteen annas. so half a rupee was "eight anna" - say it fast. or in Hindi, it's "aat anna". makes you jump when you hear it in India!
tenner £10 [Also known as a Paul McKenna (famous hypnotist).
tilbury sixpence
score £20 (Rhyming slang reference is apple core - see rhyming slang pages)
Oxford 5 shillings or a crown [derived from Oxford Scholar which rhymes with dollar which, pre-war, was just under 5 shillings Also known as Coachwheel]
'alf an Oxford 2 shillings & 6 pence or half a crown
Nicker or Quid £1 [ Also, the rhyming slang Bin Lid is used for quid -
Readies (Nelson Eddy's) Pound note [ Actually I believe "reddies" refers to £50 notes which are of course red. This term can be used to describe any amount of money. A traditional term for cash is "ready money" a term still used on Smithfield market. I would suggest that this is where the term "reddies" comes from. The term Nelsons refers to money generally, so a lot of nelsons is a lot of money]
Ton £100
Century £100 [ the expression C-Note, which he believes is American ]
Skin Diver (or Deep Sea Diver or Sky Diver or Scuba Diver or Pam Shriver) fiver [Lend us a deep sea 'til payday. n]
Sprarsy Anna Tanner (sixpence) [Lend us a sprarsy. . he wonders if Sprarsy might have something to do with the old Indian coin called an "anna". If you have any more info please let me know]
Bullseye £50
Wicker Basket £15. Neal says he's not sure of the origin although it has been suggested that it has something to do with flower sellers and Jack the Ripper (?).
Lady Godiva £5 (fiver). [Usage - 'ere, can you spare a lady?" ]
Ayrton Senna £10 (tenner). Also known as Louise Wener. See the rhyming slang tables. [Thanks to Jon Lord. Tom Good reports that he's also heard the phrase "Dead Brazilian" used, as in "I pulled a dead Brazilian out of me sky rocket"]
Plenty £20
Thrifty £50 [
One-er £100 [Pronounced "wunner". ]
Mother Hen £10
Archer £2000 [Based on the (alleged) amount Lord Jeffery Archer handed a prostitute, can't remember why but there was (again, allegedly) something dodgy about it. ]
Nugget £1 [Apparently because it's golden coloured. Thanks to Oliver Campion. Also known as Canary or Yellow-Boy. a yellow-boy, which is slang for guinea, is actually worth one pound, one shilling. I should note that when the guinea was originally struck in 1663 it was actually worth one pound - it wasn't until 1717 that the value was raised.]
Plum £100,000
Squid Quid [ commonly used in Reading]
Cock and Hen £10 [ cockle is commonly used, as in "lend us a cockle".]
Wedge Comes from when coins could be split into quarters so exact weights could be measured. The shape of these sections was a wedge.
Bottle £2 or £200 from 'bottle of glue' -> two]
Carpet £3 or £300 [Tprisoners used to get a square of carpet after being locked up for three years]
Rofe £4 or £400 (supposedly four backwards)
Jacks Alive £5
Tom Mix £6
Nevis £7 (Seven backwards)
Poorly Fish Six quid (sick squid) [- sounds like more of a bad pun than slang but ... Tom reports that the reference he knows is "dead octopus" as in "I've only been here 5 minutes and I've done a dead octopus". the expression "dodgy octopus" is also used.]
Pavarotti (tenor) Tenner - £10 [ Also referred to as a Lucy, ]
Rocket £5 - from the picture of George Stevenson's rocket on the five pound note -
Commodore £15 - how odd...this one derives from the fact that the Commodores sang "Three Times a Lady" (Lady Godiva - fiver)
Nifty £50 [Nifty - Fifty. ]
Bag of Sand £1000 (grand) [
Bernie £1,000,000 [Refers to Bernie Ecclestone of Formula One fame who donated one million pounds to the Labour election campaign - t
Jackson £5 [From the Jackson Five - t]
Long 'un £100 [Thanks to Dean Willingham]
Bag (of sand) £1000 [Bag of Sand -> Grand.
Dirty £30 [Thanks to Stuart McHugh]
Ching £5 [From the Spanish cinco perhaps.
Maggie One pound coin - As in Maggie Thatcher (under whose premiership they were introduced, I believe), because "They're brassy and think they're a sovereign."
McGiver £5 [From the popular TV series -
Melvin £5 [From Howard Melvin and the Bluenotes -
Browny £10
Edge Pence 20p [From the shape of the coin - ]
McGarret £50 [From the Hawaii-50 television series. the expression 'Jack Lord' is also used.]
Bar £1,000,000 [ it's commonly used in the money markets and thinks the origin might have originated with the value of a bar of gold - uncertain. Ben Morton offers: I suggest it's because there's a bar on top of the "M" in its roman numeral equivalent. William Foot believes it should be £10,000,000.00. I]
Alan £1 [From Alan Wicker - ]
Spanner 50p [Source might be due to the shape of the 50p - Thanks to Lee Newman. Chris offers the following "supporting evidence": Why does a fifty pence piece have flat sides? So you can use a spanner to get 'em out of a Scotsman's/ Aberdonian's/Yorkshireman's hand.]
Bobby Moore Score (i.e. £20) [Thanks to Paul Island]
Beer Token £2 coin [Andy M says that when they first appeared, a bear cost about £2]
Hampden Roar (Score) £20 [Thanks to Gary Robertson]
Cenny (century) £100 [Thanks to Gary Robertson]
Elsie Sixpence [from Coronation Streets Elsie Tanner - thanks to Carol]
Flag £5 [Thanks to Sparky James and Brian Spencer - Brian notes that £5 notes were at one time very large - this might explain the reference]
Garden Gate £8 [Thanks to Ian Crossley]
Taxi Driver Fiver - £5 {Thanks to David]
Joey Please look on the Questions page (link at the top of this page).
Shrapnel Refers to loose change [Thanks to Bruce Richardson]
Sheets General term for paper money [Thanks to Pete Orme]
Yard £1,000,000,000. [Thanks to George McLean who explains that each '000' is a foot, three feet equal one yard. Similarly, it could be a yard of yen or any other currency. Richard Stanton points out that yard is probably short for milliard, meaning 1 billion]
Dosh Any sort of money [Thanks to Lisl]
Double Nugget £2 coin [Thanks to Richard Sisson]
Bluey £5 [Because of the bills colour. Thanks to Stuart Bassett]
Charred £5 [He says that the ink on the notes often get burnt during manufacture. Thanks to Stuart Bassett]
Bertie £30 [Thanks to Stuart Bassett. Gerry Gavigan says this comes from the musical hall song "Burlington Bertie" (a tramp living in Burlington arcade in Knightsbridge) I'm Burlington Bertie I rise at ten thirty"]
Huckleberry Hound £1 [Thanks to Willie Mackay]
Bender Sixpence. I believe it got its name because real ones had a certain silver content and bending them was a way of proving this. It also led to the phrase 'going on a bender' which was a good night out drinking a whole sixpence worth! [Thanks to Peter Gazeley]
Grubby Hand £1,000 (grand) [Thanks to Jim Knight whose granddad says this expression was used in East London from Victorian times to the 1940's or 1950's.
Drinking Voucher Any denomination, the value determined by the colour - a "blue drinking voucher" would be £5 [Thanks to Nick]
Purple £20 [Thanks to Paul Brister]
Bucket of Sand £1,000 (grand) [Thanks to Andrew Tough]
Spot Each pound of a group - a ten spot would be £10, a twenty spot would be £20. [Thanks to John Lines who says this is commonly used - the spot indicates the decimal point]
Jake £5 [Thanks to Talktoi]
In the Green £25 [outer circle of the bull's eye - thanks to John Campbelton]
Heptagonal Bad Boy Another name for a twenty pence piece, used in pubs and bars for things like pool table and table football, though less so now since they usually are more expensive [Thanks to Daniel Dockery]
Spit Roast £25 [Thanks to Will who confusingly notes "because its two ayrtons and a lady"]
Stretch Tenner = 1stretch, 20 = 2 stretch, 50 = 5 stretch, etc. [Thanks to John who heard this on Commercial Road - the reference here is to prison terms]
Edge Pences 50p [Thanks to Paul Madgwick]
Half a Bar 50p [Thanks to Sig]
Sov or Sov's £1 [Short for sovereigns - Thanks to Ray Norgate]
Henry £10 [Russ says a tenner is called a Henry because of the picture on it and that an eighth of marijuana is called a henry because it costs a tenner. Matt completely disagrees with Russ - an eighth of marijuana is called a henry after Henry VIII, not because of the cost.]
Desmond £4 [Desmond Tutu (2 2) - thanks to Jeremy Adam]
String of Ponies Half a monkey (£250) - thanks to Wik
Emperor Ming Money in general [Rhymes with ka-ching (sound of a cash register). Thanks to Michelle Chiles]
Dartboard £2 coin [Because of the concentric circles in its design = Thanks to Rob Jones]
Super Nugget £2 [Origin unknown - Thanks to Martin Tilley]
Maggie £1 coin [From the eighties, of the then new gold-coloured one-pound coin, because, it was said, 'it's brassy, two-faced and thinks it's a sovereign' (the then Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, had a noticeable tendency to mimic some of the more regal characteristics of Her Majesty). Ivor Randle confirms: "As I recall, for a short while the then new pound coin was called a "Maggie" after Prime Minister of the time Margaret Thatcher, because it is "small and brassy, and thinks it's a sovereign"."]
Money that folds In general, all paper money. [Thanks to Tom Mathias]
Joes Thrupenny bit (3p) [Thanks to Toad]
Round Money Generally, coins [Thanks to Edward Williams]
Ten Bob Bit The new 50p coin [Thanks to Steve Bonnage]
Gorilla (Grilla) £1000 [According to Russell Holden, it's called this because it's two monkeys]
Brownie I understand that Ten Shillings (50p) - (Ten Bob) was a 'Brownie' because the old ten shilling note was coloured brown [Thanks to Geoff Richards-Bray]
Cherry £1 - In the '60s I was a craps dealer in London gambling clubs. Cockney 'cabbies' would play at our table, and call bets before the dice rolled. One night one of them handed me a 'fiver' with the words:" A 'Cherry' on the line mate!" I asked what he meant, and he quickly explained that he wanted £1.00 out of the fiver on the 'Win Line' 'Cherry' is short for 'Cherry Picker' which rhymes with 'nicker' which = £1.00! [Thanks to Tony Pirkis]
Groat four pence [There's lots of information at http://www.tclayton.demon.co.uk/fourd.html [Thanks to Nigel Lines]
Point £1 billion [Mark says this is used in the B of E and the European money markets - never really come up in my day to day]
Large £1000 [Thanks to Benjamin Rumble]
Rio £1000 [Thanks to Paul Page who says it comes from the Rio Grande River]
Pinky £50 [Thanks to Scott Hobson. If anyone know the origin of this please let me know.]
Tosheroon Half crown [Thanks to Sue Allen who read this in Sidney Day's London Born]
I was being asked very often where the terms "monkey" and "pony" came from. I've received the following which hopefully clears this question up.

Stephen Cheshire has provided the following: With reference to a 'monkey' for £500. I was once told that it came from soldiers returning from India where the 500 rupee note had a picture of a monkey on it. They used the term monkey for 500 rupees and on returning to England the saying was converted for sterling to mean £500.

This has been confirmed by Jason Beckett who also believes that the 25 rupee note had a picture of a pony on it.

Mathew Jackson confirms this.

Ian Crossley says: Pony comes from the time when five pound notes were white and the cost of horses or ponies and the wedding carriage and the main expenses was approx £25. People used to say "I'll pay for the pony in white", referring to the colour of the money and the wedding. Therefore five white fivers became a pony roughly the cost of a wedding.

On the other hand, Henry Charles believes the references come from diamond mining , where a monkey means 50 carats and pony 100 carats, modified to mean £50 and £100 respectively.


You left out the Warren.... a useless currency worth nothing and just annoying as all get out.


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PostPosted: Fri October 8th, 2010, 18:37 GMT 
Promethium Member
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Joined: Fri June 27th, 2008, 20:28 GMT
Posts: 17309
Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
arcadian wrote:
No-one seems to ask/know. What if you have the Sundazed editions? Will it be worthwhile getting these mono CDs or wait for Sony to come out with vinyl? Also, very good needledrops of the Sundazed have been circulated. Will these be any better. (This is only subjective)
I'm only waiting for the price to drop to something nearer reality.


If you have the Sundazed reissues then getting these would be silly unless you have to have them because it is a product that Dylan is somehow associated with, which, come to think of it, would be pretty silly too.

The Sundazed used the same masters, are all analog, and are Sony products as well in that Bob Irwin, who owns Sundazed, is a Sony employee who is able to get the vinyl rights for things that Sony doesn't think will be profitable enough for them to mess with. Now that vinyl is making a bit of a comeback at the same time that CDs are in a nosedive it will be less likely that Sundazed will get rights to stuff like Dylan, etc., in the future.


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PostPosted: Sat October 9th, 2010, 21:46 GMT 

Joined: Wed November 25th, 2009, 15:48 GMT
Posts: 11
Long Johnny, there's another side of the coin here.

You had a nice list of ebay options but buying all of those with shipping is about the same cost or more as the new pressings on Columbia (Amazon US $141). Also, the quality of the packaging and vinyl will be suspect.

Plus the new pressings are 180 gram which apparently is of better quality- both sound and longevity.

I've read quite a few complaints with the Sundazed issues. Distortion, harshness, static, flatness (http://www.stevehoffman.tv/forums/archi ... 29753.html).

Of course no one knows how the new pressings will sound, but the cnet story on Columbia's process sounds promising and they may turn out to be the best option as far as sound and packaging goes- not collector value.


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PostPosted: Sat October 9th, 2010, 23:55 GMT 
Mercury Member
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Joined: Thu July 10th, 2008, 15:11 GMT
Posts: 11529
Location: brighton uk
if the object of the exercise is to make accurate replicas of the originals - buy the originals!


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PostPosted: Sun October 10th, 2010, 00:11 GMT 

Joined: Wed November 25th, 2009, 15:48 GMT
Posts: 11
How much $ for a mint condition original and how many actually exist? If you can find all 8 mono albums in that kind of condition for less than $141 let me know.


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