Expecting Rain

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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 17:19 GMT 

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What a fantastic song. It's hard for me to discuss individual songs from BOTT, as they all seem to be one long masterpiece, for The MEZ anyway. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6oPS_C1TKg. I'm not crazy about the Hard rain version but it is solid. I'd love to hear others reccommendations of particular dates. discussion - others thoughts? Last played 6-28-08 in Spain. MEZ


Last edited by Mez on Mon January 18th, 2010, 17:23 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 17:22 GMT 
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1995 Prague :D


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 17:32 GMT 
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In 2006 Steve Adey covered the song, slowing it down to funeral pace. Adey's version made the Times top songs of 2006. The Times wrote:

"You’d have to be a fool to cover one of Dylan’s best-loved songs. Either that, or a singer with the presence — and presence of mind — to slow it right down, exposing the beauty of every syllable."

Of course the original is best, but I actually like Adeys cover.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0zvHqxPUTU


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 17:47 GMT 
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This was discussed not too long ago...lots of good versions of this song. One that seems notable for lots of people is Florence 2007, and I have to agree with them, it's wistfully looking back from a unique emotional place which I'm not going to try and put into words. If you like the song you should hear it, great sound too (rare to get both but here it is).

I also have to admit I'm still fond of the skippingly melodic versions in 1991...seriously...Wolftrap is a good example.


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 18:34 GMT 

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Overrated, rinky-dink song. It never really comes together live and is notorious for getting bad arrangements.


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 19:50 GMT 
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CShoe wrote:
Overrated, rinky-dink song. It never really comes together live and is notorious for getting bad arrangements.
This may well be true... but I've never heard a bad one. Apparently, they're never recorded??? :?


One of my favorite is from Foxwoods Resort Casino, Fox Theatre, April 22, 2005 with the lovely and talented Elana Fremmerman (now Elana James) on violin.


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 20:07 GMT 
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^That's my favourite version, too. :)


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 20:46 GMT 
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Mez wrote:
What a fantastic song. It's hard for me to discuss individual songs from BOTT, as they all seem to be one long masterpiece, for The MEZ anyway.
Old Mack agrees !
Mez wrote:
I'm not crazy about the Hard rain version...
Old Mack disagrees !


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 21:11 GMT 

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There were some genuinely lovely versions of the song performed in '05, but the first remains the best. Unfortunately, I no longer have it on my hard drive and can't locate it on YouTube, so I'm not able to share it. It was characterized by a lot of upsinging that was, for once, actually used to brilliant effect. Dylan's voice is startlingly clear and controlled for such a relatively recent performance. The way he sings "sad old men with broken teeth who are stranded without love" is flat-out amazing.

The song itself is obviously one of Dylan's most purely poetic and towers over most other entries in his songbook. A masterpiece.


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 21:25 GMT 
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sphinx wrote:
There were some genuinely lovely versions of the song performed in '05 The way he sings "sad old men with broken teeth who are stranded without love" is flat-out amazing.

The song itself is obviously one of Dylan's most purely poetic and towers over most other entries in his songbook. A masterpiece.


Totally agree.the Brixton version in 05 was brilliant too :D


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 21:26 GMT 

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sphinx wrote:
It was characterized by a lot of upsinging


Sounds awesome.

Seriously though, I have never found any claim of "good upsinging" to be valid after listening to the actual recording. Once in a while, someone will be like, "On this performance, upsinging actually sounds kinda good." Never trust that.


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 21:51 GMT 
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CShoe, I want you to know that if I recommend a song, you can trust it. I will never lie or lead someone astray... never ever... in regards to the NET.

It's just too important.


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 22:53 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
One of my favorite is from Foxwoods Resort Casino, Fox Theatre, April 22, 2005 with the lovely and talented Elana Fremmerman (now Elana James) on violin.
UP, your hard-earned knowledge of the NET is indispensible--when are you coming out with a compilation?


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 23:44 GMT 
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I can't recall a single decent live version, including that one on Hard Rain bludgeoned by ham-handed slide guitar. I love the studio version on Blood on the Tracks. I'm probably overlooking some version--it's such a simple song to play, it seems like he must have done it justice at least a few times.


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PostPosted: Mon January 18th, 2010, 23:52 GMT 
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Love most versions I have heard. The alternate that features at the end of Jerry McGuire is lovely.

I do keep going back to the Hard Rain version. Such a pwerhouse of a performance and I for one love the slide guitar on it.

Only seen it played once in Brixton 2005 and that stopped me in my tracks (pun most definitely intended!)


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PostPosted: Tue January 19th, 2010, 12:08 GMT 
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While we're talking live versions the Budokan version is horrendous. I'm a staunch defender of that album but that particular track is just dreadful. I don't think more then two notes are used for the entire song and the tone stays exactly the same as well.

In general I like the song but I think it's overrated compared to the rest of the album.


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PostPosted: Tue January 19th, 2010, 13:04 GMT 
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AndoDoug wrote:
Untrodden Path wrote:
One of my favorite is from Foxwoods Resort Casino, Fox Theatre, April 22, 2005 with the lovely and talented Elana Fremmerman (now Elana James) on violin.
UP, your hard-earned knowledge of the NET is indispensible--when are you coming out with a compilation?
Posted suggestions for disc one of a 2004 Spring Tour yesterday. Sadly, after three to four months of listening to show after show, individual performance after individual performance, I discovered two significant shows are no longer available on the A-Z thread.

I am working on a disc two for Spring 2004 and hope to have it finished in a week or so. I don't know yet if there will be a disc three. There is a lengthy explanation of my process on the link below for disc one.

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=46576

If you are a fan of Freddy Koella's work in the band, I can pretty well guarantee you will NOT be disappointed. If you dislike Freddy's guitar style, this would probably do little for you. I happen to feel that on this tour the entire band moved to some very innovative, provocative levels. Bob did some unusual and inspiring harp work, and Larry's solos, especially on All Along the Watchtower, went way over the top. But judge for yourself.


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PostPosted: Tue January 19th, 2010, 20:38 GMT 

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It is the centerpiece of the album in my eyes, the song that best captures the style and mood of the album. The song that chronicles the singer's journey away from 'home' and back again.

The song for me is exactly why Blood On The Tracks is so bloody brilliant. It can be heard as an ancient ballad from beginning to end, but for anyone who knows the author, every line holds truths that are so emotionally potent that it all intersects into a work of momentous power.
It's one of the strongest entries into the Dylan as Christ metaphors that runs throughout the rest of his work til now, but here the Christ tale is subverted into something profoundly different. The first five verses trace the journey up until this point he's singing from, the final five paint the present & the future:

Beginning the tale in a time 'when blackness was a virtue', we view the singer as an outlaw or as a martyr of some sort, on the verge of death for his cause. Rescued by a heavenly angel who 'took my crown of thorns' we see this relationship unfold:

'Twas in another lifetime, one of toil and blood
When blackness was a virtue and the road was full of mud
I came in from the wilderness, a creature void of form.
"Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."

And if I pass this way again, you can rest assured
I'll always do my best for her, on that I give my word
In a world of steel-eyed death, and men who are fighting to be warm.
"Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."

Not a word was spoke between us, there was little risk involved
Everything up to that point had been left unresolved.
Try imagining a place where it's always safe and warm.
"Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."

I was burned out from exhaustion, buried in the hail,
Poisoned in the bushes an' blown out on the trail,
Hunted like a crocodile, ravaged in the corn.
"Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."

This is a tale told in retrospect, so of course he can see the inherent problems that followed. He realizes that the shelter provided by the woman was temporal. He realizes that the issues inherent in the relationship inevitably would fester and spill out negatively. In a sense, the story is a justification for taking shelter from the storms of his life, but by the end, the song is also a cautionary tale illustrating his inner turmoil as well. We see that he is still pursued by the same demons, but now he is able to endure, to see clearly with wisdom, for he always has that 'shelter' to provide him that place of peace and serenity:

Well, the deputy walks on hard nails and the preacher rides a mount
But nothing really matters much, it's doom alone that counts
And the one-eyed undertaker, he blows a futile horn.
"Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."

I've heard newborn babies wailin' like a mournin' dove
And old men with broken teeth stranded without love.
Do I understand your question, man, is it hopeless and forlorn?
"Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."

In a little hilltop village, they gambled for my clothes
I bargained for salvation an' they gave me a lethal dose.
I offered up my innocence and got repaid with scorn.
"Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."

Finally, in the final verse, we feel the singer is forever indebted to the woman for this enlightenment, having taken him from the depths of alienation and delivering him into a new unwritten phase, one that now allows him to endure the troubles previous, but also able to see his plight in all those around him, 'old men with broken teeth' and 'newborn babies' alike. His feelings toward the 'shelter' he so needed have moved into the universal. No longer does he need that 'place that is always safe and warm' for he knows that it's as fraught with danger as anything he'd experienced before, but without it he'd never find his way home again...

Well, I'm livin' in a foreign country but I'm bound to cross the line
Beauty walks a razor's edge, someday I'll make it mine.
If I could only turn back the clock to when God and her were born.
"Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."

Just perfect.

Nappy wrote:
Love most versions I have heard. The alternate that features at the end of Jerry McGuire is lovely.

I do keep going back to the Hard Rain version. Such a pwerhouse of a performance and I for one love the slide guitar on it.

Only seen it played once in Brixton 2005 and that stopped me in my tracks (pun most definitely intended!)


We're pretty much in perfect agreement here. I remember seeing Jerry Maguire in the theatre and loving it solely for Cameron Crowe's impeccable use of music, especially there.

Hard Rain's amazing for its cathartic sound, in my top 3 of Dylan performances & albums.

And you Mr. Nappy are a very lucky man to have seen him live at that Brixton show, it slowly becoming one of my favorite concerts of recent years. From the opening Link Wray intro, you must have known were in for a good one. An amazing Hattie Carroll and a ridiculously fun Blue Monday at the end as well. The next night comes very close with those great country songs and of course the awesome yet frustrating London Calling, but for Shelter, the 23rd is the best...
The standout song of that night and week, this Shelter is easily the most epic-sounding I've heard the song played by Bob. From the ominous harp intro in Ab, through the gorgeous sound-scape the band provides; Donnie sounds gorgeous and Stu lovingly fills the song with lively yet simple invention that makes it sound as timeless as the hills.
Bob unfolds the song as I'd never heard, like he's reading a great novel, and his piano playing is just plain fantastic.

November 23 2005
http://www.sendspace.com/file/qxzk1j


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PostPosted: Tue January 19th, 2010, 21:51 GMT 
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One of my favorites


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PostPosted: Tue January 19th, 2010, 22:36 GMT 
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Marker - many thanks indeed for the download of that truly wonderful Brixton performance of surely one of everybody's favourite Dylan songs. The perfect track to convince any non-believer of the man's amazing talent as a unique writer, expressive singer, exceptional musician, and first-rate performer. I've seen a few as good in my life (Jerry Lee, Broooce, the Stones on a good night), but none better.


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PostPosted: Wed January 20th, 2010, 14:34 GMT 
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Nappy wrote:
Love most versions I have heard. The alternate that features at the end of Jerry McGuire is lovely.

I do keep going back to the Hard Rain version. Such a pwerhouse of a performance and I for one love the slide guitar on it.

Only seen it played once in Brixton 2005 and that stopped me in my tracks (pun most definitely intended!)
I am deeply humbled to be in the cyber-presence of anyone who comments on having been at that show... everytime someone mentions it I am in awe... There is no way, even listening to the boot, to know the effect of actually being there was like.

Leaving the auditorium and walking among mere mortals after a show like that had to be some kind of experience. I suspect it was weeks before you could actually feel your feet touch the ground again. 8)


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PostPosted: Wed January 20th, 2010, 14:47 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
Nappy wrote:


Leaving the auditorium and walking among mere mortals after a show like that had to be some kind of experience. I suspect it was weeks before you could actually feel your feet touch the ground again. 8)


Gettng drunk in the Weatherspoons Pub near the Academy is my overiding memory of my after show experience (unless you mean the Hrd Rain Show of course) :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon February 8th, 2010, 15:19 GMT 
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I'm obsessed with the Hard Rain version of this song right now. It totally rocks.

Also, Bobby looks hot as hell singin' it.


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PostPosted: Mon February 8th, 2010, 15:44 GMT 

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whatsittoya wrote:
Marker - many thanks indeed for the download of that truly wonderful Brixton performance of surely one of everybody's favourite Dylan songs. The perfect track to convince any non-believer of the man's amazing talent as a unique writer, expressive singer, exceptional musician, and first-rate performer. I've seen a few as good in my life (Jerry Lee, Broooce, the Stones on a good night), but none better.


I was there! A mighty performance. Entrancing.


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PostPosted: Mon February 8th, 2010, 17:25 GMT 
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6oPS_C1TKg

Un Refugio a tu Dolor.

Sucedió en otra vida, sangre y lucha, la razón
cuando el negro era alegre y en el cielo no había sol.
Vine de una tierra extraña siguiendo una dirección;
y ella dijo:"Pasa, aquí hallarás un refugio a tu dolor".

Y si alguna vez volviese no tengais ningún temor;
prometí cuidar de ella puse en el juego mi honor
en un mundo de promesas, mantendré mi decisión
y ella dijo: "Pasa, aquí hallarás un refugio a tu dolor".
...

A un país lejano con mis huesos fui a parar
La belleza es transparente, no es posible de alcanzar
Retornar a aquellos días, ser de nuevo tú y yo
Ella dijo: "Pasa, aquí hallarás un refugio a tu dolor".


Copyright: jcastro


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