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PostPosted: Thu November 9th, 2017, 05:59 GMT 
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Another Self Portrait is a masterpiece in its own right. I've never been more pleasently surprised by a Dylan release. While I wouldn't quite put it on par with Tell Tale Signs its probably in the heaviest rotation of any Bootleg Series.


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PostPosted: Thu November 9th, 2017, 06:46 GMT 
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For me, BS 13 is one of the highlights of the whole series.
Great songs, great performances, I really liked the two booklets, the whole packaging.
Of course we could discuss endlessly about the song selection, why was this song included, and that song left out? But there is not one song on this 8 cds that I totally dislike.
BS 13 is up there with BS 1-3, TTS and the Live 1975 release.


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PostPosted: Thu November 9th, 2017, 13:55 GMT 
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As someone who has only bought one de luxe package of the Bootleg Series (The Cutting Edge) I was surprised just how much I enjoyed BS Vol 13 - I enjoyed it much more than Another Self Portrait, The Witmark Demos or The Basement Tapes, No Direction Home also more than Live 1964 and Live 1975.
It doesn't come up to BS Volumes 1 - 3, 4 or Tell Tale Signs though!


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PostPosted: Thu November 9th, 2017, 21:10 GMT 
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Location: Cleland, Scotland
Anr Bjotk wrote:
Mail Train wrote:
You don't like Another Self Portrait, Anr Bjotk?


Does anyone?

compared to the absolute dross thats on this current one?
I love ASP


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PostPosted: Thu November 9th, 2017, 21:23 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 22nd, 2015, 18:33 GMT
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Would liked to have had Lets Keep It Between Us. I cannot for the life of me understand why it was omitted.So many great live
versions to choose from.


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PostPosted: Thu November 9th, 2017, 22:47 GMT 

Joined: Mon August 21st, 2006, 12:20 GMT
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Location: uk
For me it's top 3 of the bootleg series but the finishing touch would have been to include the "Matthew" live version of TUIB from late 78,possibly the first anyone knew he was going to change his way of thinking


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PostPosted: Thu November 9th, 2017, 22:50 GMT 
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greatmate wrote:
Would liked to have had Lets Keep It Between Us. I cannot for the life of me understand why it was omitted.So many great live
versions to choose from.


The songs omission deserves a thread all of its own.
See it's omissions like that make me think Dylan had a small hand
in what was released on this particular bootleg series release.
I can't imagine a compiler missing that one.
So it might have been on instruction ''don't release this one'' by
the man himself.
Another reason makes me feel like Dylan had a hand in this release
was in interview around the time Tempest came out, he'd said he
wanted to do a religious album put couldn't construct a formulated
and themed album, so wrote what was a fine album in any case,
for me anyway, i preferred Tempest to his previous two studio albums.
I just think that god, religion, spirituality might be on his mind,
the older some people get, the more they do think about it.
Then again i'm probably completely wrong and Dylan couldn't care
less what Columbia put out on these bootleg release's, i could see
him wanting nothing to do with The Cutting Edge, but i just get
the feeling he had a hand in this B13 boxset.


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PostPosted: Thu November 9th, 2017, 23:56 GMT 

Joined: Tue December 30th, 2008, 09:05 GMT
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Location: Liverpool
I love this set, but...! Yes, the '79 soundboards are better than the audience tapes but they do sound 'flat' and 'lifeless' as others have commented. Personally I would have preferred one full concert for each year; one of the Toronto concerts would have more than covered 1980, and as they were professionally recorded they are all much better quality than the 1980 sbds that are included. 1981 there is just so much choice and you could have easily released two or three concerts from this year. Also the recording and performances are all much more powerful.
Again, there could have been more studio outtakes included and at least one live rendition of Let's Keep It Between Us and Rise Again should have been.
This is not knocking what was included, and it is a very impressive set. Just personal preferences. It's certainly up there with the best of the Bootleg sets and, apart from the 60's releases, I don't think any period has had this much focus (8 discs) before.


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PostPosted: Fri November 10th, 2017, 13:45 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 5th, 2006, 11:56 GMT
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bobbycat wrote:
Got my Vinyl box Set some days ago and was slightly dissapointed because many of these soundboard recordings sound flat and lifeless to me. Don´t get me wrong, it´s not the music and his singing which is passionate and full of life. It lies in the nature of the recording. Then I got the deluxe set via legal download and the Toronto 80 and London 81 concerts are both sublime on all levels and regarding the fact that there are many more stellar concert recordings from 81 I wish they would have focused more on these (Oslo, New Orleans, Houston..etc.)


Which tracks sound flat? I found most of the 2 CD set sounds pretty good, but when I heard some of the Earl's Court tracks form Disc 7 they sound very flat, at least via headphones.


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PostPosted: Fri November 10th, 2017, 20:13 GMT 
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gerardv wrote:
-Outtakes. I think it's a little below average. There was a lot more
from the SOL sessions that still lies on the cutting room floor. The
emphasis on the gospel material gives the boot focus, but to the
exclusion of a lot of great material. One extra cd could have fixed this.

-Live. Here it's above average. The concerts are passionate and there's
more of a dynamic than in most other periods.

-Artwork & presentation. It's stellar as usual. I treat the Trouble In Mind
book as a companion by extension, which works well. It's so dense, I'm
only 90 pages in.

Still, my expectation is that Bootleg 14 will surpass 13. This may become
the best in the series, considering Scorsese's charted documentary con-
tribution, the BOTT extras and tons of phenomenal concert recordings
with audio resolution superior to most of the the 1979-1981 live work.
Agreed for pretty much all of this, though I'm not huge on the presentation. The artwork is a little uninspired for such inspirational music, but hey.

The outtakes are really where they dropped the ball. There's so much good from those Shot of Love sessions and somehow most of the good stuff got lost in the weeds. My favorite rendition of Caribbean Wind is still yet to be released, as well...


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PostPosted: Sat November 11th, 2017, 04:30 GMT 
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Okay let's do this! I'm gonna rank the one's I can and then explain my two outliers that I just can't find a place for:

1 - Tell Tale Signs (2 Disc Version - disc three is fine but it's an overpriced bonus)

Pros: TTS does what no other release has managed; taken a period of Dylan's that is already wonderful and revealed a completely different - but equally rich - side to the story. As an album it just FLOWS as well as any proper studio release he's put out. The quality of the songs and performances is staggering and the TOOM outtakes in particular hint at an alternate version of a masterpiece that is equally brilliant.

Cons: It's a tad front-loaded. I don't think Disc 2 is in anyway bad but there's no denying that the major moments are on the first disc. The sequencing in and of itself is good but I can't help but feel like spreading out some of the great outtakes across the second disc would have helped. Also I don't believe there's not a better sounding Lonesome Day Blues somewhere in the vaults.

2 - Another Self Portrait (2 Disc Version - Isle of Wight is a great release but it's a bonus)

Pros: If I had to pick my favourite period of vocals for Dylan; when pressed I'd choose the amazing expressiveness on this release. The covers are the best of his career and the alternate approach to New Morning trounces it so thoroughly. On top of everything it is just such a shock to hear such great music from a period that had been completely written off. It's not a 'big' statement like Dylan's other great works but the stunning performances and perfect sequencing means that at the end of the day it is one of the most played albums in my collection.

Cons: Minstrel Boy sticks out like a sore thumb, particularly as it would see release in only a year. The Isle of Wight songs I'm on the fence about. They are a key part of that era's story and mirror the structure of the original Self Portrait but they do stick out a bit and I do think a better song could have been chosen.

3 - The Basement Tapes Raw (The Complete tapes certainly needed a release but its overkill for everyday listen)

Pros: I never liked the Basement Tapes before this release. I found the official release horribly produced and the bootlegs never convinced me. Something about these crisp remasters and choice of material revealed how wonderful the music being maid was. While the period is often remembered for Dylan's speak/singing and novelty songs the very vulnerable vocals on I'm Not There/Sign on The Cross/Wheel's On Fire etc. dominate about half of the album and they're what keep me coming back. Furthermore, while this was a lo-fi endeavour, that definitely does not make it any slouch aurally. This is the last time the band would play a tasteful backing group and not the bombastic superstars they'd become by Planet Waves and the music made is startling.

Cons: Unfortunately there's still a lot of important music missing from Raw but I still find listening to all 5 discs way too much. So while this is a great release in its own right there still is no 'perfect' Basement Tapes release.

4 - Trouble No More

Pros: I love the structure of this release: 4 sets of two-disc collections that each provide something different. It's an extremely thorough rendition of the period without every feeling like a warts-and-all archive dump. The first two discs are the highlight; showcasing a variety of stunning performances that give you the sense Columbia really dug deep to find the best showcase of each song. A true labour of love.

Cons: There's nothing Rosen and co. could have done but this era was archived terribly. So much of it sourced from raw feeds on cassette which really undermines the quality of release. You can obviously get past it eventually but it is a bit flat - and not in the charming lo-fi way of the 66 board recordings. Also Dylan's outtakes of this period aren't as revealing as others.

5 - Live 1975

Pros: Simply put the best live period of Dylan's. There's little to write about other than it being the best singing of his performing career backed by the most fascinating band he ever assembled. The recordings are pristine and perfectly mixed. The best live album he's ever released.

Cons: I take no issue with compiling the release from various concerts; what confuses me is how the sequencing was decided on. Sometimes the tracks flow, sometimes they fade out; the track list kind of mirrors the average setlist but also diverges from it in weird places. The recordings are of uniform quality - why not just make it sound like a single concert? Also if I wanted to really nitpick I'd argue that while the performances are unmatched the setlist choice isn't the best of his career.

6 - The Cutting Edge (5 disc version - the 2 disc feels like cherrypicking and the 18 disc is just overkill)

Pros: It's mid-sixties Dylan... this music is unquestionably gonna be great. The BIABH sessions reveal a very spontaneous and bluesy set of sessions that are the most revealing while there are several cool alternate arrangements from BoB that are pretty interesting. Most importantly we get some essential versions of She's Your Lover Now that cement it as one of his great songs (BS1-3 never convinced me).

Cons: Does anything on the Cutting Edge make you question the final sequencing of any of these albums? Does anything challenge what you thought you knew about this era? The few cuts that challenge the superiority of the album takes are generally the same arrangement and really just a minor quibble while the genuinely different arrangements were abandoned for a reason. Historical significance? Sure. Essential part of the Dylan canon? No. If the great BS releases are like director's cuts that trounce the original film, this is nothing more than a behind the scenes bonus feature.

7 - The Whitmark Demos

Pros: Pretty much every original composition of the early 60s is placed back to back in an amazing cross section of Dylan's development as a songwriter. The performances are certainly no slouch either.

Cons: At the end of the day almost every song here can be found in better sound quality with an identical or superior performance. If you completely divorce yourself from what's available then this is a nice listen... but you can't do that. The inconsistency of the sound quality also ruins what should be the selling point; having all these songs under one umbrella. You can't call it 'bad' - it's just completely superfluous.

8 - Live 1964

Pros: Dylan's clearly excited by his newer compositions; in particular the debut of It's Alright Ma is fascinating. It's also significant to hear him at the height of his popularity and adoration and actually enjoying it and owning it. Probably the most crowd-pleasing and friendliest side of him as performer that would ever be seen.

Cons: It's just not a very good performance. Dylan's vocals on this and Another Side are so brutally nasal that it starts to drag. His 'classics' don't feel like they mean much to him anymore and this probably feautres the worst Baez duets you'll ever here. He's having fun no doubt; but he might be having too much fun.

9 - No Direction Home

Pros: Some cool highlights of Dylan's live performances from his early career can be found. Pre-Cutting Edge, the outtakes on disc 2 were pretty cool if not earth shattering.

Cons: I can't for the life of me work out what the selection criteria was here. It just feels like a sampler of what Columbia has lying around in the vaults. The disc one outtakes are completely minor and the superior live cuts are fleeting. While I never thought that much of this one it has been rendered even more superfluous by subsequent releases, The Cutting Edge, Whitmark Demos and 1966 Recordings make more than half of this album irrelevent and even as a compilation it's inadequate.

The Ones I Can't Rank

Live 1966

I fell in love with this when I first got into Dylan but I played the damn thing to death. I have no idea where I'd put it in this list now because I can't recapture that initial sense of discovery. Furthermore, is it invalidated by the arguably better mix created before release? Did the release of the 1966 recording render it underwhelming? I honestly don't know anymore.

Volume 1-3

The music unearthed here is stunning - I'm not arguing against that but the sequencing is really frustrating. The folk years are given a thorough and revealing illumination but halfway through Disc 2 the choices get more perfunctory and the inconsistent weighting of different periods makes it a really inconsistent listen. Elsewhere borderline-finished versions of unreleased songs are placed aside underwhelming outtakes of classics. With no clear MO as to whats selected and his entire recorded output to choose from, the finished product feels a tad confused. So its an utter revelation but one that feels made to be ransacked for your own playlist. It's great music - but so is The Essential Bob Dylan.


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PostPosted: Sat November 11th, 2017, 08:20 GMT 
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boiledgutsofbirds wrote:
Okay let's do this! I'm gonna rank the one's I can and then explain my two outliers that I just can't find a place for:

Great to read your thoughts on the series so far and I agree with a lot of the points you've made. Tell Tale Signs is probably my favourite if I was ranking them in order and I agree with what you said about CD1, most of the best stuff is indeed collected on that disc - probably because Sony originally released it in three formats - the 1CD format, the standard 2CD format and the 3CD 'package'. I initially bought the 2CD set but when I saw the 1CD format going for £3 in a local supermarket it was a must have!
With The Cutting Edge I also bought the 6CD set as I thought the 2CD set was indeed 'cherry picking' and it is my favourite period. You say the 18 CD set is overkill - I believe you could be right as even a whole disc of Like A Rolling Stone gets to me after a while.
From the comments you and others have made about Another Self Portrait I'm going to have to go back and do a bit of rediscovery. I haven't played it that much so perhaps I need to go back and listen again.
After forking out quite a bit of cash for A Tree With Roots some years ago I couldn't bring myself to fork out for The Basement Tapes Complete so made do with the 2CD set. It's a vast improvement on the set released by Columbia in 1976 but I wouldn't want more.
I still rate Live 1966 very highly, it might have been overtaken by the complete 1966 live set but I love the original for what it is.
The Trouble No More 2CD set is a great listen but as I'm not a great fan of The Gospel Era I wouldn't want the out takes. I am going to try and get a copy of one of the live shows that were included in the set!


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PostPosted: Sat November 11th, 2017, 14:16 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 5th, 2006, 11:56 GMT
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As said above, it's always interesting to hear other people's opinions, and this is a big topic - in fact there's a good book to be written on just the Bootleg Series. I'm guessing you're a fair bit younger than me, and didn't come to the BS releases in the same way, but even so I often find your opinions inexplicable. On the other hand, sometimes I do agree with you and it is good that you take the time to share your thoughts.

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:
Okay let's do this! I'm gonna rank the one's I can and then explain my two outliers that I just can't find a place for:

1 - Tell Tale Signs (2 Disc Version - disc three is fine but it's an overpriced bonus)

Pros: TTS does what no other release has managed; taken a period of Dylan's that is already wonderful and revealed a completely different - but equally rich - side to the story. As an album it just FLOWS as well as any proper studio release he's put out. The quality of the songs and performances is staggering and the TOOM outtakes in particular hint at an alternate version of a masterpiece that is equally brilliant.

Cons: It's a tad front-loaded. I don't think Disc 2 is in anyway bad but there's no denying that the major moments are on the first disc. The sequencing in and of itself is good but I can't help but feel like spreading out some of the great outtakes across the second disc would have helped. Also I don't believe there's not a better sounding Lonesome Day Blues somewhere in the vaults.



Yeah, it is front loaded, and Disc 1 flows; and Disc 3 was a disgrace, pricing wise, the start of the really agressive price gouging.

I don't see it as being as revalatory as you suggest but few could argue its rightful place towards the very top of the BS list.

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

2 - Another Self Portrait (2 Disc Version - Isle of Wight is a great release but it's a bonus)

Pros: If I had to pick my favourite period of vocals for Dylan; when pressed I'd choose the amazing expressiveness on this release. The covers are the best of his career and the alternate approach to New Morning trounces it so thoroughly. On top of everything it is just such a shock to hear such great music from a period that had been completely written off. It's not a 'big' statement like Dylan's other great works but the stunning performances and perfect sequencing means that at the end of the day it is one of the most played albums in my collection.

Cons: Minstrel Boy sticks out like a sore thumb, particularly as it would see release in only a year. The Isle of Wight songs I'm on the fence about. They are a key part of that era's story and mirror the structure of the original Self Portrait but they do stick out a bit and I do think a better song could have been chosen.



This one really was quite revelatory when it came out. I haven't played it as much since, though. Played it a lot at the time and then sort of forgot about it. Just dug it out again today and planning to rediscover it soon. Some great stuff here, and it was a big surprise in terms of rehabilitating the era.

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

3 - The Basement Tapes Raw (The Complete tapes certainly needed a release but its overkill for everyday listen)

Pros: I never liked the Basement Tapes before this release. I found the official release horribly produced and the bootlegs never convinced me. Something about these crisp remasters and choice of material revealed how wonderful the music being maid was. While the period is often remembered for Dylan's speak/singing and novelty songs the very vulnerable vocals on I'm Not There/Sign on The Cross/Wheel's On Fire etc. dominate about half of the album and they're what keep me coming back. Furthermore, while this was a lo-fi endeavour, that definitely does not make it any slouch aurally. This is the last time the band would play a tasteful backing group and not the bombastic superstars they'd become by Planet Waves and the music made is startling.

Cons: Unfortunately there's still a lot of important music missing from Raw but I still find listening to all 5 discs way too much. So while this is a great release in its own right there still is no 'perfect' Basement Tapes release.



Basement Tapes Bob is not among my top 5 Bob eras, by any means. Always found the Basement Tapes (original release) a little over-rated - sacrilige, I know - and although it's good to have the 'raw', and lose the over-production and dreary Band tracks, I still haven't really been inspired to fully explore this one.

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

4 - Trouble No More

Pros: I love the structure of this release: 4 sets of two-disc collections that each provide something different. It's an extremely thorough rendition of the period without every feeling like a warts-and-all archive dump. The first two discs are the highlight; showcasing a variety of stunning performances that give you the sense Columbia really dug deep to find the best showcase of each song. A true labour of love.

Cons: There's nothing Rosen and co. could have done but this era was archived terribly. So much of it sourced from raw feeds on cassette which really undermines the quality of release. You can obviously get past it eventually but it is a bit flat - and not in the charming lo-fi way of the 66 board recordings. Also Dylan's outtakes of this period aren't as revealing as others.



Hate the price tiering with a vengeance. Love Disc 1 and a few tracks on Disc 2. Glad I didn't shell out for the 'deluxe', but there are some good things on the other discs I've heard e.g. Earl's Court. Agree that some of it is a bit flat sounding. The out-takes are not stellar and there are tracks from the era missing. Still, enjoying it more so far than I expected.

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

5 - Live 1975

Pros: Simply put the best live period of Dylan's. There's little to write about other than it being the best singing of his performing career backed by the most fascinating band he ever assembled. The recordings are pristine and perfectly mixed. The best live album he's ever released.

Cons: I take no issue with compiling the release from various concerts; what confuses me is how the sequencing was decided on. Sometimes the tracks flow, sometimes they fade out; the track list kind of mirrors the average setlist but also diverges from it in weird places. The recordings are of uniform quality - why not just make it sound like a single concert? Also if I wanted to really nitpick I'd argue that while the performances are unmatched the setlist choice isn't the best of his career.



No way is this the best live period. Are you serious?! It is good, though, if a bit shouty and over-cooked in places. Again, loved it on release but have not gone back to it as often as I thought. Imagine the size this would be if they released it now, it'd be about 10 discs. Maybe the next BS will?

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

6 - The Cutting Edge (5 disc version - the 2 disc feels like cherrypicking and the 18 disc is just overkill)

Pros: It's mid-sixties Dylan... this music is unquestionably gonna be great. The BIABH sessions reveal a very spontaneous and bluesy set of sessions that are the most revealing while there are several cool alternate arrangements from BoB that are pretty interesting. Most importantly we get some essential versions of She's Your Lover Now that cement it as one of his great songs (BS1-3 never convinced me).

Cons: Does anything on the Cutting Edge make you question the final sequencing of any of these albums? Does anything challenge what you thought you knew about this era? The few cuts that challenge the superiority of the album takes are generally the same arrangement and really just a minor quibble while the genuinely different arrangements were abandoned for a reason. Historical significance? Sure. Essential part of the Dylan canon? No. If the great BS releases are like director's cuts that trounce the original film, this is nothing more than a behind the scenes bonus feature.



Your prespective baffles me. Firstly, why judge BS releases by how 'revelatory' they are, rather than on musical quality? Secondly, this is much more 'revelatory' than you suggest. This is an important release, BS or no BS, and seems to be sorely under-valued around here. Probbaly the best BS release since Vols I to III. Historical significance is only part of it, really it's the unbelievable music that counts: geat, truly valuable alternate version after version, almost too much to assimilate. Someone will one day write a book around this, with or without Live 66.

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

7 - The Whitmark Demos

Pros: Pretty much every original composition of the early 60s is placed back to back in an amazing cross section of Dylan's development as a songwriter. The performances are certainly no slouch either.

Cons: At the end of the day almost every song here can be found in better sound quality with an identical or superior performance. If you completely divorce yourself from what's available then this is a nice listen... but you can't do that. The inconsistency of the sound quality also ruins what should be the selling point; having all these songs under one umbrella. You can't call it 'bad' - it's just completely superfluous.



Agree, in BS terms a bit of a damp squib. Enjoyable in a small way.

Where can you find 'almost every song here' in 'better sound quality with an identical or superior performance', though? (I as genuinely.)

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

8 - Live 1964

Pros: Dylan's clearly excited by his newer compositions; in particular the debut of It's Alright Ma is fascinating. It's also significant to hear him at the height of his popularity and adoration and actually enjoying it and owning it. Probably the most crowd-pleasing and friendliest side of him as performer that would ever be seen.

Cons: It's just not a very good performance. Dylan's vocals on this and Another Side are so brutally nasal that it starts to drag. His 'classics' don't feel like they mean much to him anymore and this probably feautres the worst Baez duets you'll ever here. He's having fun no doubt; but he might be having too much fun.



Similar criticisms were made at the time, I think they were a bit unfair. The voice is a bit nasal, but the performance is very good, I don't know how you can say it's not.

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

9 - No Direction Home

Pros: Some cool highlights of Dylan's live performances from his early career can be found. Pre-Cutting Edge, the outtakes on disc 2 were pretty cool if not earth shattering.

Cons: I can't for the life of me work out what the selection criteria was here. It just feels like a sampler of what Columbia has lying around in the vaults. The disc one outtakes are completely minor and the superior live cuts are fleeting. While I never thought that much of this one it has been rendered even more superfluous by subsequent releases, The Cutting Edge, Whitmark Demos and 1966 Recordings make more than half of this album irrelevent and even as a compilation it's inadequate.



Totally overshadowed by the Scorsese film, a mish mash that has, as you say, become even more superfluous given subsequent releases. Makes you wonder what they were thinking. Basment Tapes aside, my least favourite BS release.

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

The Ones I Can't Rank

Live 1966

I fell in love with this when I first got into Dylan but I played the damn thing to death. I have no idea where I'd put it in this list now because I can't recapture that initial sense of discovery. Furthermore, is it invalidated by the arguably better mix created before release? Did the release of the 1966 recording render it underwhelming? I honestly don't know anymore.



Ansolutely fantastic music, obviously of less value now given Live 66. Why so long between Vols I to III and this? Why so long between this and Vol 5?

boiledgutsofbirds wrote:

Volume 1-3

The music unearthed here is stunning - I'm not arguing against that but the sequencing is really frustrating. The folk years are given a thorough and revealing illumination but halfway through Disc 2 the choices get more perfunctory and the inconsistent weighting of different periods makes it a really inconsistent listen. Elsewhere borderline-finished versions of unreleased songs are placed aside underwhelming outtakes of classics. With no clear MO as to whats selected and his entire recorded output to choose from, the finished product feels a tad confused. So its an utter revelation but one that feels made to be ransacked for your own playlist. It's great music - but so is The Essential Bob Dylan.


[/quote]

The original and best. Still by far the best BS release. Some of your quibbles are hard to understand. Again you are under-rating this significantly. If this was all Dylan had released, just these tracks, it woud be enough to make him one of the most importnat figures in the history of popular music. Maybe you weren't around at the time? This was a big, big event. And age has not withered it, if anything it has grown in stature.

My top 3 BS releases in order:

Vols I to III
Cutting Edge
Tell Tale Signs


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PostPosted: Sat November 11th, 2017, 14:39 GMT 
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FieldingMellish wrote:
As said above, it's always interesting to hear other people's opinions, and this is a big topic - in fact there's a good book to be written on just the Bootleg Series. I'm guessing you're a fair bit younger than me, and didn't come to the BS releases in the same way, but even so I often find your opinions inexplicable. On the other hand, sometimes I do agree with you and it is good that you take the time to share your thoughts.

My top 3 BS releases in order:

Vols I to III
Cutting Edge
Tell Tale Signs


Another great overview of the Series and I have to say that your Top 3 BS releases mirror mine but in a different order. Live 1966 comes next and Trouble No More (2 CD set) comes in after those. I'm going to backtrack and take in Another Self Portrait again, I think some more time has to be devoted to it!


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PostPosted: Sat November 11th, 2017, 19:21 GMT 
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after 2 listens, I'd say:

1-3
66
75
edge
trouble
64
BTapes
signs
direction
portrait
demos


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PostPosted: Sat November 11th, 2017, 20:29 GMT 
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boiledgutsofbirds wrote:
Another Self Portrait is a masterpiece in its own right. I've never been more pleasently surprised by a Dylan release. While I wouldn't quite put it on par with Tell Tale Signs its probably in the heaviest rotation of any Bootleg Series.


Have you all lost your minds?? I'd easily burn the master tapes to SF/ASF. What a load of nonsense. I couldnt pick one song from there I've listenend and enjoyed apart from Quinn from Isle of Wight. Not only does it not sound like Bob; the songs are sub-par and embarrassing. It's like Dylan with the Dylan missing.
Then again, I never got Nashville Skyline so maybe there's something wrong with me.


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PostPosted: Sun November 12th, 2017, 00:30 GMT 
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All but witmark, 1964, and no direction are for me, essential. And fill in the gaps in the story. Trouble no More is right there with all of the others, and not only fills in the gaps in the story, but is the go-to now for this era. God bless the BS series!


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PostPosted: Sun November 12th, 2017, 00:55 GMT 
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Anr Bjotk wrote:

Have you all lost your minds?? ...

...Then again, I never got Nashville Skyline so maybe there's something wrong with me.


In a way, I think I understand how you are feeling regarding this, Anr.
I continue to have a similar, or parallel, experience in reference to the American Standards period discs. Like the feeling of a fish out of water.


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PostPosted: Sun November 12th, 2017, 02:55 GMT 
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Maybe I just wasn't in the mood for it, but I got the 2-CD edition and so far it's my least favorite of the series. I didn't even listen to disc 2 yet. I kept thinking, "Is it close to being over yet?"


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PostPosted: Sun November 12th, 2017, 05:54 GMT 
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John B. Stetson wrote:
All but witmark, 1964, and no direction are for me, essential. And fill in the gaps in the story. Trouble no More is right there with all of the others, and not only fills in the gaps in the story, but is the go-to now for this era. God bless the BS series!


See, I adore No Direction Home. A stupendous colletion of outtakes and highlights. A perfect sampler, really, though not a three course meal.


Still Go Barefoot wrote:
Anr Bjotk wrote:

Have you all lost your minds?? ...

...Then again, I never got Nashville Skyline so maybe there's something wrong with me.


In a way, I think I understand how you are feeling regarding this, Anr.
I continue to have a similar, or parallel, experience in reference to the American Standards period discs. Like the feeling of a fish out of water.


Nobody hates the American Standards more than me. Compared to the Sinatra nonsense, ASF seems like a masterpiece, but it's just a trick of the light.


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PostPosted: Sun November 12th, 2017, 09:24 GMT 
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We can debate the relative merits of the music forever, but for me this volume raises the bar for future Bootleg Series releases.

It's got stunning video, its got 2 (essentially) complete shows, its got curated live performances and its got outtakes, all backed up with great photos and writing.

I'll always love the music contained on TCE above all else but in terms of the overall quality of the release itself, nothing else comes close...yet.


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PostPosted: Sun November 12th, 2017, 09:49 GMT 

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I don't share the love for Another Self Portrait. To me it's ok, nothing more, pretty much like the album it spawned. I love the Basement Tapes but five discs is too much to digest so you have to compile your own version, which I guess is the point of having it all.


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PostPosted: Mon November 13th, 2017, 08:45 GMT 
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Anr Bjotk wrote:
Nobody hates the American Standards more than me. Compared to the Sinatra nonsense, ASF seems like a masterpiece, but it's just a trick of the light.

I think you have quite a few rivals to the first part of your statement but after all the good things said about ASP here I'm more than willing to give it another shot!


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PostPosted: Mon November 13th, 2017, 11:45 GMT 
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ASP is 2 nice discs bumped up to be a Deluxe Edition with a wholly unnecessary re-mastered version of the original (aka turd polishing) and the IOW concert which is pretty poor Bob imo. Nice photos though.

As an overall package it doesn't come close.


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PostPosted: Mon November 13th, 2017, 12:06 GMT 

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I have the two-disc ASP since its release and only first listened to it a few weeks ago. I was pleasantly surprised. There is some very good stuff on it, but my expectations weren't nearly as high as for the latest release.

TNM doesn't exceed my expectations as much as ASP because they were already very high, but it matched them. For that reason, I rate it very highly in absolute terms, moreso than ASP.

In contrast my expectations for TTS were also greatly exceeded but, unlike ASP, it is more than just the contrast in perception-it is very much the real deal.

I don't like ranking all the series, because it's like comparing apples and oranges and various other fruits, but I've always considered No Direction Home a little less worthy than the rest because of, despite some great material, a certain lack of focus.


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