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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 06:53 GMT 

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With an elaborate introduction now published and the release date just weeks away,
a bit of discussion & speculation on the book may be right on time.

https://dylantroubleinmind.wordpress.com/introduction/

The book, by Heylin's own account "connects the dots by drawing on a wealth of new
information, much of which has not been in the public domain before".

Mr Heylin's unconventional judgment of Dylan's material is in evidence: he judges 'Heart
of Mine" to be mere filler. Seems like an interesting read though.


Last edited by charlesdarwin on Wed October 4th, 2017, 06:59 GMT, edited 1 time in total.
Corrected thread title.


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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 13:05 GMT 

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I was told my copy was posted last Friday, still waiting.


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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 13:07 GMT 
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gerardv wrote:
With an elaborate introduction now published and the release date just weeks away,
a bit of discussion & speculation on the book may be right on time.

https://dylantroubleinmind.wordpress.com/introduction/

The introduction is excellently written. Hats off to Clinton. Nice work.

Personally, I hung in there with Bob through the "Gospel Years." It was painful at first, but the music was phenomenal. Watching him open with 'Trouble' years later with G.E. Smith in Boston's Combat Zone further solidified that the correct choice was made. It's been way more difficult to survive the 'Covers of Sinatra Covers Years' !!!

Excited about this BS 13.

Here's Clinton's excellent intro:

INTRODUCTION TO TROUBLE IN MIND BY CLINTON HEYLIN

BEFORE THE FLOOD
I never felt like I was searching for anything. I always felt that I’ve stumbled into things or drifted into them. But I’ve never felt like I was out on some kind of prospector hunt, looking for the answers or the truth … I never went to the holy mountain to find the lost soul that is supposed to be a part of me … I don’t feel like a person has to search for anything. I feel like it’s all right in front.

—BOB DYLAN TO DENISE WORRELL, 1985

Caveat emptor: I am an evangelist. That is to say, when it comes to the evangelical part of the Dylan canon – what in mediaspeak has been defined, rather misleadingly, as the gospel years (i.e. 1979-81) – I’m a believer. Not a trace of doubt in my mind.

From the moment I heard a live performance of ‘Covenant Woman’ from the November ’79 Warfield shows at a one-day Dylan convention in Manchester the following month, I knew the man had (re)connected to the wellspring of his art when that ol’ sign on the cross began to worry him.

As I have long argued, in person and in print, the consummate songwriter composed a body of work in the period 1979-81 which more than matches any commensurate era in his long and distinguished career – or, indeed, that of any other twentieth century popular artist.

But unlike that other seminal starburst of inspiration, the one between 1965 and 1967, the afterglow of this cerebral explosion is barely reflected within the grooves of the trilogy of albums CBS released in real time: Slow Train Coming (1979), Saved (1980) and Shot Of Love (1981).

Perhaps it’s because Dylan’s heart really wasn’t in the process of making records at the time. He did, after all, suggest in an interview designed specifically to promote the third album in said trilogy, that his primary interest was playing ‘songs which [a]re gonna relate to the faces that I’m singing to. And I can’t do that if I[‘m] spending a year in the studio, working on a track. It’s not that important to me. No record is that important.’ Said interview appeared on a CBS promo album.

The epicentre of Dylan’s artistry at the cusp of the decades – as it had been in the mid-seventies – was the stage; surely one reason why, starting in November 1979, he took an acetylene torch to the 1978 set list and began afresh. As he said at the time on his one radio interview, quoting 2 Corinthians, ‘All things become new, old things are passed away.’

To howls of protest that couldn’t help but remind one of the folk-rock furore thirteen years earlier, he delivered the same unrelenting Good News/Bad News message night after night, while each night becoming born again as a performing artist in front of the aghast eyes and ears of Dylan apostates.

Just as from September 1965 to May 1966, the shows which ran from November 1979 to the following May saw the gospel gauntlet thrown down nightly. Dylan delivered an unceasing barrage of biblical glossaries set to the soundtrack of a heavenly choir and a band of unbelievers riding the musical tide all the way to New Jerusalem. But this time there was no near-death experience to deflect Dylan from his chosen path. He would continue beating his ecumenical drum most of the time for the next eighteen months.

For much of this period, his was very much a voice in the wilderness. Much of the media, and a large percentage of his hardcore fan base, simply switched off. The North American gospel shows – All Saints’ Day ’79 at the San Francisco Warfield excepted – tended to receive only local reviews, and rarely drew ones interested in reporting the facts.

As for the shows themselves, journalists delighted in reporting that this ‘voice of a generation’ couldn’t even sell out intimate theatres. Even the eight English shows in July 1981 struggled (and failed) to sell out, barely three years after people were camping out for 72 hours just to get a single ticket for six Earls Court shows.

(Those arch-arbiters of fan demand, the bootleggers, were also switching off just as Dylan’s muse was switching on again, deeming demand to be insufficient from a demographic of wavering disciples.)

So, although Dylan played some ninety-eight shows between November 1979 and December 1980, all but a handful of which were still being taped by hardcore collectors, not a single vinyl bootleg was released in real time; and this, from the most bootlegged rock artist of all time. As for official album sales, the cliff Dylan fell off in 1980 with the catastrophic Saved was one it would take him seventeen years to scale again.

So, on the face of it, hardly the sort of period where a thorough revisit would send ripples of excitement through the Dylan world in 2017. And yet, when at the start of the year Dylan’s long-time manager hinted to a Rolling Stone reporter that the next Bootleg Series (lucky thirteen!) would re-examine the gospel years afresh, the fan sites were abuzz with anticipation.

Because, as a Nobel poet once put it, ‘Everything passes, everything changes.’ And three decades on, an official release (or two) of a judicious sample of one or two legendary residencies in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Toronto, Montreal or London ranks high on most Bobcats’ bucket lists.

Ranking higher still for those whose focus is the studio oeuvre is a set that also affords a thorough re-examination of the two dozen songs Dylan wrote in the six months leading up to the Shot Of Love sessions. With 20/20 hindsight, the album bearing that name – even though it has real moments – stands as perhaps the most underwhelming Dylan studio collection of original songs to date, with maybe three performances on the official Shot Of Love worthy of inclusion on the double-album it should have been: the title track itself, a ‘Property Of Jesus’ that aside from a remix could hardly be bettered, and ‘Every Grain Of Sand’.

The good news – praise the Lord of Happenstance – is that the period 1979 to 1981 turns out to be among the best documented eras in Dylan’s six-decade-long career as a recording/ performance artist.

The explanation for this resides in two events dating back to January 1978: the purchase of a brand-new, state-of-the-art, eight-track tape machine made by Otari, the MX-5050, shortly after Dylan had signed a five-year lease on a rehearsal studio in downtown Santa Monica.

These serendipitous twists of fate meant Dylan could begin to record most rehearsals at his newly leased studio; demo songs he wished to copyright; as well as run tapes of all the shows he was to perform during a 115-date world tour. The rehearsal studio, known privately as Rundown, throughout this period would even serve as a sometime-recording studio for the two albums which bookend the Rundown era, Street-Legal and Shot Of Love.

Indeed, Dylan soon grew so comfortable with his Santa Monica ‘home studio’ set-up that he rekindled a work ethic last seen in the happy days spent in the Big Pink basement in West Saugerties, New York, with the last standing band he kept on retainer, the mostly-Canadian Hawks, back in 1967.

Having put together the second standing band of his career in September 1979, it should come as no great surprise that the dividing line between tour rehearsals, album sessions and copyright demos for the next two years would be as fuzzy as one of Fred Tackett’s effect-pedals; or that the aesthetic of the basement tape should be so readily revived by its instigator twelve years on, with a set of musicians no less accomplished than The Band and perhaps even more sympathetic to Dylan’s way of working on the hoof.

In those two years, the body of work Dylan and his band captured at Rundown Studios, between tours (and albums), is in many ways more impressive than the one he and The Band managed from their 1967 country retreat. The breadth of material tackled, if presented in its entirety, would certainly challenge that now available on the official ‘basement tapes’ Bootleg Series.

At least Trouble No More – the next Bootleg Series – more than hints at a Rundown facsimile of the ‘lost’ album Dylan could have recorded in the fall of 1980 – but didn’t! Frustratingly, when Dylan did finally enter the very same rehearsal studio where he demoed an album’s worth of new songs six months earlier, to begin the new album in March 1981, he had already discarded half a dozen strong compositions and begun to bastardize the lyrics to two defining post-conversion masterpieces, ‘Caribbean Wind’ and ‘The Groom’s Still Waiting At The Altar’.

By the time Dylan relocated to Chuck Plotkin’s Clover studio in late April 1981 to begin work on Saved’s successor in earnest, he was well on his way to making an album that was one-third filler (‘Heart Of Mine’, ‘Lenny Bruce’, ‘Trouble’) but just one-third killer. Yet Dylan himself would compare Shot Of Love with 1965’s Bringing It All Back Home, which to his mind once provided a similar ‘breakthrough point’.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the two ensuing tours – a summer tour of Europe and a fall tour of the States – would signal a rerouting of the holy slow train. By second tour’s end, few vestiges of that preternatural commitment to his newly-wrought gospel material remained.

When the second anniversary of his landmark November 1979 West Coast residencies came around, Dylan was still on the road, heading for the Florida swamplands. Yet all that he had embraced when baptised by Vineyard pastor Bill Dwyer was not washed away.

He would soon fuse the sensibilities he was reaching for on Shot Of Love on the no less apocalyptic Infidels (1983). But that is another story, from another time and place. This trenchant tract confines itself to straddling the great divide which separates the smooth-as-silk Slow Train Coming from the bear’s-arse monitor mix that is Shot Of Love, covering all bases between.

It connects the dots by drawing on a wealth of new information, much of which has not been in the public domain before. Hopefully, it will achieve its primary goal: to serve as a testament to the inspiration faith can bring when aligned to genius, making a case for a wholesale re-evaluation of the music Dylan made during his so-called religious period.

With the release of an 8-CD Deluxe Bootleg Series, the three studio albums will no longer be the be-all and end-all of the gospel years, and we are a whole lot closer to knowing what really happened, artistically. As always with Dylan, it turns out that the more we understand, the more we can enjoy…


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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 14:42 GMT 

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"It connects the dots by drawing on a wealth of new information, much of which has not been in the public domain before. Hopefully, it will achieve its primary goal: to serve as a testament to the inspiration faith can bring when aligned to genius, making a case for a wholesale re-evaluation of the music Dylan made during his so-called religious period."

Do we know what this is? The Tulsa archive?


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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 15:38 GMT 
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Take It Easy Fred wrote:
"It connects the dots by drawing on a wealth of new information, much of which has not been in the public domain before. Hopefully, it will achieve its primary goal: to serve as a testament to the inspiration faith can bring when aligned to genius, making a case for a wholesale re-evaluation of the music Dylan made during his so-called religious period."

Do we know what this is? The Tulsa archive?


I'm reading Scott Marshall's "Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life" right now and it's hard to believe Heylin could have more access than what's in there...if so that's great I guess.


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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 16:36 GMT 
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Has anyone read Heylin's previous Bob book? I'm on the fence on which one to buy... 66 is more interesting, but I'd love to hear more about Bob spiritual life.


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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 17:22 GMT 
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That’s a good intro. Was on the fence but I’ll get the book, thanks for posting that.


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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 18:24 GMT 

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Terrible writing. I couldn't finish the introduction, never mind a whole book of this bilge.


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PostPosted: Wed October 4th, 2017, 19:09 GMT 
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Cold Irons Bound wrote:
Take It Easy Fred wrote:
"It connects the dots by drawing on a wealth of new information, much of which has not been in the public domain before. Hopefully, it will achieve its primary goal: to serve as a testament to the inspiration faith can bring when aligned to genius, making a case for a wholesale re-evaluation of the music Dylan made during his so-called religious period."

Do we know what this is? The Tulsa archive?


I'm reading Scott Marshall's "Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life" right now and it's hard to believe Heylin could have more access than what's in there...if so that's great I guess.


Just finished Marshall's book, myself. Very thorough, well researched and replete with supportive references and notes. An excellent primer for the Gospel set.


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PostPosted: Thu October 5th, 2017, 04:37 GMT 
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Anr Bjotk wrote:
Has anyone read Heylin's previous Bob book? I'm on the fence on which one to buy... 66 is more interesting, but I'd love to hear more about Bob spiritual life.


I was disappointed in "Judas" - it was little more than a simple "and then this happened ..." book.
I like my books to offer a bit more than that. Not sure Heylin will do that anymore now that he is on the inside. Doesn't want to jeopardise his position and who could blame him tbqh.

Hopeful on this one.


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PostPosted: Thu October 5th, 2017, 05:27 GMT 
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The Bard wrote:
Anr Bjotk wrote:
Has anyone read Heylin's previous Bob book? I'm on the fence on which one to buy... 66 is more interesting, but I'd love to hear more about Bob spiritual life.


I was disappointed in "Judas" - it was little more than a simple "and then this happened ..." book.
I like my books to offer a bit more than that. Not sure Heylin will do that anymore now that he is on the inside. Doesn't want to jeopardise his position and who could blame him tbqh.

Hopeful on this one.


Hmm... I was worried that was the case. Any interesting or new information in it (Judas)?

And was the book first announced with the title "Trouble no more" or did I misread the title originally?


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PostPosted: Thu October 5th, 2017, 08:32 GMT 
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Anr Bjotk wrote:
And was the book first announced with the title "Trouble no more" or did I misread the title originally?


I recall that it was always called Trouble In Mind.


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PostPosted: Thu October 5th, 2017, 15:03 GMT 
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Somebody Naked wrote:
Anr Bjotk wrote:
And was the book first announced with the title "Trouble no more" or did I misread the title originally?


I recall that it was always called Trouble In Mind.


Right... Guess my mind played tricks on me.


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PostPosted: Thu October 5th, 2017, 16:52 GMT 
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Mickvet wrote:
Just finished Marshall's book, myself. Very thorough, well researched and replete with supportive references and notes. An excellent primer for the Gospel set.


Did you also find it odd how he essentially skipped over Shot of Love? He spent 10-15 pages on Slow Train Coming and Saved, examining almost every single track individually, but there were only brief mentions of Shot of Love. Thought it was a little strange how he glossed over it.


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PostPosted: Thu October 5th, 2017, 17:10 GMT 
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Cold Irons Bound wrote:
Mickvet wrote:
Just finished Marshall's book, myself. Very thorough, well researched and replete with supportive references and notes. An excellent primer for the Gospel set.


Did you also find it odd how he essentially skipped over Shot of Love? He spent 10-15 pages on Slow Train Coming and Saved, examining almost every single track individually, but there were only brief mentions of Shot of Love. Thought it was a little strange how he glossed over it.


True. Song analysis isn't really his strength. I also thought his treatment of Tempest was quite cursory compared to Modern Times. In fairness, he is only interested in Dylan's songs to the degree that they support his primary agenda, Dylan's continued acceptance of Christ as his Messiah. As far as that's concerned, Dylan has more continuously and consistently performed some of the Slow Train and Saved songs in concert than any from SOL, with the possible exception of Every Grain of Sand. The Slow Train/Saved songs, being more overtly and unambiguously Christian could be said to be more confirmative of his case, as well. We can't rule out his own personal taste, either.


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PostPosted: Thu October 5th, 2017, 20:17 GMT 

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When Bob forgot the words to "Serve Somebody"--in 1986 or 1987--and started singing any crap that came into his head, as if it was "Rainy Day Women" or "Everything Is Broken," is when we can say definitively that wasn't a born again Christian anymore. I don't see any point anyway in looking for evidence of some sort of consistent belief system. Bob believes all sorts of things. He can believe as many as six impossible things before breakfast.


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 06:56 GMT 
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mojofilter wrote:
When Bob forgot the words to "Serve Somebody"--in 1986 or 1987--and started singing any crap that came into his head, as if it was "Rainy Day Women" or "Everything Is Broken," is when we can say definitively that wasn't a born again Christian anymore. I don't see any point anyway in looking for evidence of some sort of consistent belief system. Bob believes all sorts of things. He can believe as many as six impossible things before breakfast.


A bit like yourself, then.


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 14:24 GMT 
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Mickvet wrote:
... Dylan's continued acceptance of Christ as his Messiah.


Maybe it's not that simple.

Image

Image

Image


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 15:28 GMT 

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Mickvet wrote:
mojofilter wrote:
When Bob forgot the words to "Serve Somebody"--in 1986 or 1987--and started singing any crap that came into his head, as if it was "Rainy Day Women" or "Everything Is Broken," is when we can say definitively that wasn't a born again Christian anymore. I don't see any point anyway in looking for evidence of some sort of consistent belief system. Bob believes all sorts of things. He can believe as many as six impossible things before breakfast.


A bit like yourself, then.


Thank you!


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 15:47 GMT 
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mojofilter wrote:
When Bob forgot the words to "Serve Somebody"--in 1986 or 1987--and started singing any crap that came into his head, as if it was "Rainy Day Women" or "Everything Is Broken," is when we can say definitively that wasn't a born again Christian anymore.


What? What was this? Was it recorded?


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 16:00 GMT 

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Anr Bjotk wrote:
mojofilter wrote:
When Bob forgot the words to "Serve Somebody"--in 1986 or 1987--and started singing any crap that came into his head, as if it was "Rainy Day Women" or "Everything Is Broken," is when we can say definitively that wasn't a born again Christian anymore.


What? What was this? Was it recorded?


I don't mean he suddenly forgot the words, and there's a concert where you can hear it happen. I mean that since the gospel tours, he's never bothered to get the words to this song right. It's actually a lot like "Rainy Day Women," you know--just a list of stuff in no particular order. Songs like that can be hard to memorize, and obviously, for Bob, it's not worth the trouble. He'd rather wing it. A true believer would take the trouble.


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 16:06 GMT 
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Harry Truman wrote:
Mickvet wrote:
... Dylan's continued acceptance of Christ as his Messiah.


Maybe it's not that simple.

Image

Image

Image


Many Jews who accept Christ maintain their Jewish traditions. Others integrate more completely into the conventional Christian traditions, abandoning their former traditions in the process. The former group tend to describe themselves as 'Messianic Jews' or 'Jews for Jesus'. There is no fundamental incompatibility between Torah Judaism and Christianity. Christ Himself was a practicing Jew, declaring that He did not come to abolish the Law or the Prophets, but to fulfill them.

There's nothing new in all this. The vast majority of the first Christians were Jews, and initially they were inclined to impose their Jewish traditions, including circumcision and dietary laws;and festival celebrations upon Gentile converts. Finally, a Council was called about the matter in Jerusalem, the first such meeting of its kind, about 50AD and a compromise was agreed. With the passage of time and the relative eclipse of the influence of converted Jews due to the enormous influx of Gentiles into the Church, this Jewish culture faded, but the Church still vigorously resisted the Marcion heresy of the second century which was an attempt to obliterate completely the Jewish culture of the Church, including the suppression of the Old Testament.

This is all described much better than my little attempt by convert from Judaism to Catholicism, Roy H. Schoeman, in his 'Salvation is from the Jews'.


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 16:15 GMT 
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mojofilter wrote:
Anr Bjotk wrote:

What? What was this? Was it recorded?


I don't mean he suddenly forgot the words, and there's a concert where you can hear it happen. I mean that since the gospel tours, he's never bothered to get the words to this song right. It's actually a lot like "Rainy Day Women," you know--just a list of stuff in no particular order. Songs like that can be hard to memorize, and obviously, for Bob, it's not worth the trouble. He'd rather wing it. A true believer would take the trouble.


Can you provide some examples? Ones that demonstrate actual incoherence?

And have you considered that 'true believers' are usually far from perfect, and might very well not 'take the trouble' and even be quite careless, but this doesn't necessarily abrogate their beliefs? He may very well have sung Serve Somebody carelessly at times, as it was a song he performed very often at certain periods and for most human beings familiarity can breed contempt. He generally took considerable care with Gospel songs that he performed more occasionally, and particularly that variety of old-time Gospel covers he performed in the late nineties/early noughties. Likewise with his rewritten Gonna Change My Way of Thinking, in more recent times.


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 16:42 GMT 
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mojofilter wrote:
I don't mean he suddenly forgot the words, and there's a concert where you can hear it happen. I mean that since the gospel tours, he's never bothered to get the words to this song right. It's actually a lot like "Rainy Day Women," you know--just a list of stuff in no particular order. Songs like that can be hard to memorize, and obviously, for Bob, it's not worth the trouble. He'd rather wing it. A true believer would take the trouble.


Uhm... Do you have any idea how many shows that man does a year? And how many songs he's written? Of course he'll forget the words sometimes.
Sometimes he plays around with the material. re-arranging verses and mixing it up.
Not to mention so much of what constitutes His Bobness is his unflappable cool (Soy bomb, anyone?) and punk-like (Letterman rehearsals, Grammys 1991, etc) indifference with unintelligible mumbling.
I wont pretend to know what he thinks, but I've always felt he seems to have a very blasé attitude to his own legacy, sometimes seemingly wanting to be anywhere else than on stage.
He's managed to create one hell of an mythological image for himself.

mojofilter wrote:
since the gospel tours, he's never bothered to get the words to this song right..

That's nonsense.
Yes, he sometimes flubs the lyrics, but apart from it being another example of his undeniable coolness, is has no other signigicance. And certainly nothing to with his religion. What, do Christians never forget stuff and never take themselves lightly?


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PostPosted: Fri October 6th, 2017, 16:58 GMT 
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I think mojofilter is specifically referring to 'list songs' like Serve Somebody and Rainy Day Women, where for the last 20 years Bob as just made the lyrics up as he goes along - sometimes with good results, sometimes with disastrous results.


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