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PostPosted: Sat December 6th, 2014, 13:41 GMT 

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DylanEgo wrote:
Just one thing about Duke. From what I saw on the video, his playing did not blend into Bob's performance as well as Charlies playing did. Duke's playing seemed to prominent and distracting.



"Duke's playing seemed to prominent and distracting"

Very observant Mr. Ego - and exactly what is meant by "upstaging"- and exactly why he was shown the door. Some people simply don't get it, but you have nailed it.


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PostPosted: Sat December 6th, 2014, 13:44 GMT 
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chrome horse wrote:
DylanEgo wrote:
Just one thing about Duke. From what I saw on the video, his playing did not blend into Bob's performance as well as Charlies playing did. Duke's playing seemed to prominent and distracting.



"Duke's playing seemed to prominent and distracting"

Very observant Mr. Ego - and exactly what is meant by "upstaging"- and exactly why he was shown the door. Some people simply don't get it, but you have nailed it.

Thank you Chrome horse. As a guitar playing I can sense these things pretty easily. I wonder if Charlie insisted on a raise before he returned?


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PostPosted: Sat December 6th, 2014, 13:47 GMT 
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DylanEgo wrote:
When did Larry Campbell start playing with Bob Dylan?


Larry came on board in March of 1997. There's a story somewhere that Dylan invited him to join up and J.J. Jackson was not aware that his gig was up until he showed up and Larry was there. Don't know if its true but I can imagine that would be an uncomfortable moment for everyone there.

He's the consummate professional. He's one you can count on to do whatever needs to be done. He can play about any stringed instrument, he can drive the rhythm or handle the lead, he can back the vocals and provide harmony as needed, and can handle just about any musical style.

As with most everyone that's toured with Dylan, he's never really said much aside from acknowledging he toured with Bob. I suppose he left because he was ready to have his own life back. Touring for seven years with Dylan kept him on the road for nearly nine months a year. A home life and personal life are hard to manage like that. He's performed with numerous artists since then and has put a lot of effort into supporting his wife's career and seems to be enjoying that.


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PostPosted: Sat December 6th, 2014, 13:59 GMT 

Joined: Wed February 16th, 2005, 21:50 GMT
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DylanEgo wrote:
Thank you Chrome horse. As a guitar playing I can sense these things pretty easily. I wonder if Charlie insisted on a raise before he returned?


For Robillard, playing with Bob Dylan was undoubtedly the pinnacle of his career, and the temptation to head over the top with his guitar was obviously a temptation he couldn't suppress. When I saw him in Lowell, and he did the outstanding acoustic lead in the middle of Tangled, it took my breath away, and everyone elses in the room.

Years ago, I had a brief stint managing a jazz fusion band - The Brubeck Brothers. They were the sons of jazz legend Dave Brubeck.
They had coined their own word for musicians who overstepped their bounds and tried to steal the limelight with their own wizardry.
They would say "Yeah, he was really "hoiging" it up out there!".

People who think musicians, even Bob Dylan, don't have fragile ego's are living in a dream world. The history of rock is littered with bruised ego's and former band members who will never play together again or even talk to each other - Plant/Page, Slash/Rose, Halen/Roth etc. etc.


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PostPosted: Sat December 6th, 2014, 14:05 GMT 
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chrome horse wrote:
DylanEgo wrote:
Thank you Chrome horse. As a guitar playing I can sense these things pretty easily. I wonder if Charlie insisted on a raise before he returned?


For Robillard, playing with Bob Dylan was undoubtedly the pinnacle of his career, and the temptation to head over the top with his guitar was obviously a temptation he couldn't suppress. When I saw him in Lowell, and he did the outstanding acoustic lead in the middle of Tangled, it took my breath away, and everyone elses in the room.

Years ago, I had a brief stint managing a jazz fusion band - The Brubeck Brothers. They were the sons of jazz legend Dave Brubeck.
They had coined their own word for musicians who overstepped their bounds and tried to steal the limelight with their own wizardry.
They would say "Yeah, he was really "hoiging" it up out there!".

People who think musicians, even Bob Dylan, don't have fragile ego's are living in a dream world. The history of rock is littered with bruised ego's and former band members who will never play together again or even talk to each other - Plant/Page, Slash/Rose, Halen/Roth etc. etc.


I saw The Brubecks when they played Ronnie Scotts in September. Outstanding musicians.


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PostPosted: Sat December 6th, 2014, 20:02 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
Touring for seven years with Dylan kept him on the road for nearly nine months a year.


This is why I believe he left. Larry Campbell is extraordinarily talented and his tenure with Dylan is my favorite NET lineup. In many cases, time is more valuable than money and there is very little time for other areas of life when you're on the road as much as Dylan.


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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 02:39 GMT 

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You know, that thing with Duke, Duke is playing exactly how Duke Robillard plays, on a rockabilly / blues jam, his forte. I mean what you hire the guy for if you don't like that stuff?

Also kind of answers a question that's popped into my head on several occasions, I wonder sometimes when Bob's playing his two note solo's whether he's kind of expecting the lead players to play off of that, rather than just laying back and letting him take the front. I'd always suspected that he doesn't intend that his stuff is the lead part, but more of a counterpoint thing. It's tremendously effective when it is that and his lead players are stepping all over him, and it's been horrible ever since I first heard it in 1998 when he plays his two note solo thing and it's the actual solo. I guess I should have known that if he wanted his lead players to play over him then that's what they would be doing.

Apart from that jam with Duke going on too long, I thought Duke was playing real nice stuff against Bob's piano. Weird. I guess Bob seriously thinks he's a keyboard player?


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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 03:42 GMT 
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davidotas wrote:
You know, that thing with Duke, Duke is playing exactly how Duke Robillard plays, on a rockabilly / blues jam, his forte. I mean what you hire the guy for if you don't like that stuff?

Also kind of answers a question that's popped into my head on several occasions, I wonder sometimes when Bob's playing his two note solo's whether he's kind of expecting the lead players to play off of that, rather than just laying back and letting him take the front. I'd always suspected that he doesn't intend that his stuff is the lead part, but more of a counterpoint thing. It's tremendously effective when it is that and his lead players are stepping all over him, and it's been horrible ever since I first heard it in 1998 when he plays his two note solo thing and it's the actual solo. I guess I should have known that if he wanted his lead players to play over him then that's what they would be doing.

Apart from that jam with Duke going on too long, I thought Duke was playing real nice stuff against Bob's piano. Weird. I guess Bob seriously thinks he's a keyboard player?


I wondered the same exact thing about Bob expecting a counterpoint layer on top of his notes. I know when I would lay down a simple track solo on my home recorder and recorded a new track over the simpler track, it made for a much richer sound when I played more elaborate notes on top of the simpler notes.


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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 11:30 GMT 

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Here's another take on the Robillard upstaging, where a reviewer saw one thing, but missed what was really going on -

"What I loved about this gig, was that Tony Garnier played precision bass, and augmented Duke's guitar playing. At one point, Dylan just leaned on his piano and watched the masterful Robillard shred the fretboard. It reminded me of gigs I saw of Duke with "Roomful of Blues," at the Knickerbocker in Westerly and the old Lupos in downtown Providence back in my hell raising days. Dylan really let this horse out of the barn, and the Duke put the spurs to her. Garnier nailed his rhythm shots, and showcased Robillard's blusey brilliance. This, was my favorite moment of the gig; musicianship at it's best. The giving and taking of a good bass player and a sharp guitar player, without upstaging each other, is about as professional as it gets."


Bob "stopped" playing and just watched Duke - never seen anything like that before.

http://block-island.villagesoup.com/p/ataboy-bobby-dylan-tony-garnier-duke-robillard-et-al/986198


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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 11:43 GMT 
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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 11:51 GMT 
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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 12:03 GMT 
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Sorry to swerve things further of course but I just never got the praise heaped on Duke. I mean he kind of reminded me of a slightly less versatile Denny. When he was playing lead, he was playing 'lead' and lead only. Soloing and riffing over everything. The 2013 tour was an amazing change of pace by Charlie's return (at least by the European tour) created a much better sound.


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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 13:57 GMT 
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michael curtius wrote:
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That was a really fun day. Lots of cohorts from the soon-to-be-released Masked & Anonymous crew were up on the side stage checking it out. Miss Larry!


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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 15:20 GMT 
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chrome horse wrote:
Here's another take on the Robillard upstaging, where a reviewer saw one thing, but missed what was really going on -

"What I loved about this gig, was that Tony Garnier played precision bass, and augmented Duke's guitar playing. At one point, Dylan just leaned on his piano and watched the masterful Robillard shred the fretboard. It reminded me of gigs I saw of Duke with "Roomful of Blues," at the Knickerbocker in Westerly and the old Lupos in downtown Providence back in my hell raising days. Dylan really let this horse out of the barn, and the Duke put the spurs to her. Garnier nailed his rhythm shots, and showcased Robillard's blusey brilliance. This, was my favorite moment of the gig; musicianship at it's best. The giving and taking of a good bass player and a sharp guitar player, without upstaging each other, is about as professional as it gets."


Bob "stopped" playing and just watched Duke - never seen anything like that before.

http://block-island.villagesoup.com/p/ataboy-bobby-dylan-tony-garnier-duke-robillard-et-al/986198

This reviewer sees it the way I do. Nothing about that clip suggests a pissed off Bob to me, but hey, I wasn't there. Looks like he's having a fine old time, nodding along and enjoying his great band, possibly thinking 'what a shame Duke's handed in his notice, I'll miss his playing.'

Maybe I'm missing 'what was really going on' too, how could anybody really know?


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PostPosted: Sun December 7th, 2014, 15:57 GMT 
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PostPosted: Mon December 8th, 2014, 23:05 GMT 

Joined: Tue May 24th, 2011, 01:37 GMT
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DylanEgo wrote:
davidotas wrote:
You know, that thing with Duke, Duke is playing exactly how Duke Robillard plays, on a rockabilly / blues jam, his forte. I mean what you hire the guy for if you don't like that stuff?

Also kind of answers a question that's popped into my head on several occasions, I wonder sometimes when Bob's playing his two note solo's whether he's kind of expecting the lead players to play off of that, rather than just laying back and letting him take the front. I'd always suspected that he doesn't intend that his stuff is the lead part, but more of a counterpoint thing. It's tremendously effective when it is that and his lead players are stepping all over him, and it's been horrible ever since I first heard it in 1998 when he plays his two note solo thing and it's the actual solo. I guess I should have known that if he wanted his lead players to play over him then that's what they would be doing.

Apart from that jam with Duke going on too long, I thought Duke was playing real nice stuff against Bob's piano. Weird. I guess Bob seriously thinks he's a keyboard player?


I wondered the same exact thing about Bob expecting a counterpoint layer on top of his notes. I know when I would lay down a simple track solo on my home recorder and recorded a new track over the simpler track, it made for a much richer sound when I played more elaborate notes on top of the simpler notes.


When I first saw Bob, Larry Campbell was playing lead guitar with Bucky still in the group, and he got one solo the entire night, and even my non Dylan fan brother and friend and even a reviewer who clearly wasn't a Dylan fan all noted "what's with the two note guitar solo's?".

A couple of years later, I heard Charlie and Larry stepping all over Bob's "rhythm lead" playing, and it was golden, I figured Charlie was the reason. It's weird, because Bob's a huge Grateful Dead fan, and he's doing something very similar to what they do, where you have a counterpoint player or two just edging the main melody player into higher heights and counterracting off of that, and multiple lead parts playing at once, and it's fantastic, and Dylan's done it ever since he toured with the Dead, rather than the 'get out of the way it's solo time' method of rock/swing 101.

But for some reason even when I saw him playing a few months ago, he again seemed to be dominating with his piano. Even weirder, I remember thinking as far back as 1995 that his harmonica playing had also gone to this two note thing. It's very effective when there are other guys bringing up the rear, maybe he just doesn't understand the magic trick he's going for.


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PostPosted: Tue December 9th, 2014, 02:34 GMT 

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At the end of Larry's last show with Bob, Bob introduced him as "the golfer of the group." "Every time he goes out to play he wears two pairs of pants, in case he gets a hole in one." It's a silly joke, but he wouldn't have said it if he and Larry were on bad terms at the end. To last 8 years with Bob is a huge achievement and a credit to his character. He always seemed so serene and calm onstage. In my opinion, Larry's the most technically versatile musician to ever tour with Bob. He was something else.

How true is that joke? Extremely true. How many Watchtowers were saved by Larry's steady hand? First solo misses, second solo (Larry) makes up for it and excels. I saw that kind of thing a lot. He was very, very professional onstage. Never interrupted Bob and always came in perfectly with just a nod or a gesture. To do that for 8 years is commendable. Bob's joke there at the end shows that he recognized that.


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