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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 08:16 GMT 
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movin_after_midnight wrote:
One listen and I'm convinced this is a KILLER song. The arc of the lyrics goes something like this:

Verse 1: Roman Kings were an early gang, probably in New York, tough S.O.B.'s who ruled the place. Don't mess with them.
.


There's also the clear reference to the 19th century rail barons, driving their workers into early graves, in the race to connect East to West:

drivin' the spikes in
raisin' the rails
nailin' the coffins
in top hats and tails


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 08:26 GMT 
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Jonnie Falafel wrote:
Well the bawdiness & double entendre continue in the same vein as the previous 3 albums. There's a lot of "recycling the same old thoughts" .... I mean, how many variations of "all the women... " doing something can there be! Dragging down to hell too... There's not a whole lot of writing skill in this lyric at all, but it's fun. Does anyone else think it doesn't sound like TTL? Let's hope this is a minor song and that somewhere on this album there'll be something of the grandeur of Mississippi or Nettie Moore or even Forgetful Heart. The titles sounded interesting and Early Roman Kings is just not as interesting as its title!


I agree. Hopefully there will be some more interesting songs on the album.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 08:31 GMT 
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DO any of you who have issues with the glorification of violence in 'Joey' like the lyrics of 'Early Roman Kings'?

Check your hypocrisy at the door.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 08:36 GMT 

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Rick7348 wrote:
all the early roman kings
in the early early morn
comin' down the mountain
distributing the corn


I am still undecided if I find is funny and (thus) appealing or just plain stupid. :?
Anyway, all in all the lyrics are more interesting than most of TTL IMO - I guess that's a good omen.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 08:42 GMT 
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And the ModBob lyric-taker, he blows a feudal horn.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 11:01 GMT 
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goodnitesteve wrote:
All the early Roman kings
In their sharkskin suits
Bow ties and buttons
High top boots
Drivin’ the spikes in
Blazin’ the rails
Nailed in their coffins
In top hats and tails
Fly away, little bird
Fly away, flap your wings
Fly by night
Like the early Roman kings

all the early roman kings
in the early early morn
coming down the mountain
distributing the corn
speeding through the forest
racing down the track
you try to get away
they drag you back
Tomorrow is friday
we’ll see what it brings
everybody’s talking
bout the early roman kings

They’re peddlers and they’re meddlers
They buy and they sell
They destroyed your city
They’ll destroy you as well
They’re lecherous and treacherous
Hell-bent for leather
Each of ‘em bigger
than all them put together
Sluggers and muggers
Wearing fancy gold rings
All the women goin’ crazy
For the early Roman kings

I can dress up your wounds
with a blood-clotted rag
I aint afraid to make love
to a bitch or a hag
if you see me comin’
and you’re standing there
wave your handkerchief
in the air
I ain’t dead yet
my bell still rings
I keep my fingers crossed
like them early roman kings

i can strip you of life
strip you of breath
ship you down
to the house of death
one day
you will ask for me
there’ll be no one else
that you’ll wanna see
bring down my fiddle
tune up my strings
I’m gonna break it wide open
like the early roman kings

i was up on black mountain
the day Detroit fell
they killed ‘em all off
and they sent ‘em to hell
ding dong daddy
you’re coming up short
gonna put you on trial
in a sicilian court
i’ve had my fun
i’ve had my flings
gonna shake em all down
like the early roman kings

I think that's correct, I went through and corrected some of the phrasing errors and a spelling error.


:shock: :D
Just listened for the first time ! It's a masterpiece . One hell of a song . I'm thrilled . How does he still do it ?
Benny , that bitch or hag line is classic Dylan to me , i didn't think you'd be so puritan. :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 11:17 GMT 
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Tragos114 wrote:
It's a masterpiece


Is it possible you're being a wee bit over the top?


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 11:18 GMT 
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smoke wrote:
Tragos114 wrote:
It's a masterpiece


Is it possible you're being a wee bit over the top?



No it's not . I adore it . I don't care what you say , that's ModBob poetry ! :)


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 11:21 GMT 
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I can see the violence but I don´t see any glorification of it...


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 11:23 GMT 
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hana wrote:
I can see the violence but I don´t see any glorification of it...


Um, ok!

Really? I must have missed him singing "only kidding" at the end of each line.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 11:26 GMT 
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Tragos114 wrote:
smoke wrote:

Is it possible you're being a wee bit over the top?



No it's not . I adore it . I don't care what you say , that's ModBob poetry ! :)





:D Well, I'm glad you feel that way :D

I like it fine...if it were a TTL outtake I'd argue it should be on the album.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 11:34 GMT 
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What - you think it's better than 'Jolene'?

Only kidding.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 11:35 GMT 
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I'm very excited right now , smoke , so i'm obviously exaggerating :mrgreen: . But i really love the song . I like TTL a lot and i think this sounds better than TTL. It's probably no MT or L&T but who cares ? :wink:
Can't wait for the album ..




Bennyboy wrote:
What - you think it's better than 'Jolene'?

Only kidding.


Well , i guess it is :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 12:27 GMT 
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Bennyboy wrote:
hana wrote:
I can see the violence but I don´t see any glorification of it...


Um, ok!

Really? I must have missed him singing "only kidding" at the end of each line.


BennyBoy's questions as to whether there is increasing violence in ModBob (as he calls the post TOOM era) and its relation to earlier songs like Joey are tough for me to answer. But I think he is on to something. I am not sure where I stand ultimately on it, but he's made me think it through a bit. Here's a stab at an answer:

This is just a first pass. I've got a simple answer and a less simple one.

Simple answer: yes, recent songs are more directly, person to person violent (sexually and otherwise). I think that's tied to his rejection of the importance and value of social powers and institutions. You might call it feudal, I'd agree but only if you meant something like: a veneer of order and legitimacy masking brute power as the only real foundation for authority and a general chaotic violence that is never really subdued (despite all the talk of the King's Peace). It may be better to call it primordial or primitive. I think his world view is much, much starker now than it has been. Men are inherently and ineradicably evil and violent (women are evil and treacherous and violent when possible). Systems and institutions are really just instruments of someone's evil and violent desires. Contrast that with the way violence get's explained in the early 60s (Only A Pawn, e.g.). Violence is systemic and in some sense abstract. Even Hattie Carroll is a symbol as is the killer. And there is always a kind of possibility of confronting and stopping that violence. Masters of War is the counter example to this -- like when it ceases to be 'Society' at fault and it's a bunch of guys Dylan wants to personally see dead. But even then, its not a guy named Mike that he's going to kill himself.

Longer answer:
There is no doubt that there is some kind of affinity for violence in his work since L&T. Keep in mind that I am nowhere near as engaged with Dylan's work as BennyBoy and others here are, and so I don't know in any really systematic and comprehensive way how that violence compares to the albums that preceded L&T. But, I have listened to them all (I think).

First, to clear up 'affinity' -- there's plenty of violence in his work going all the way back: murders, assassinations, wars and battles. But often, especially early on, he is in some meaningful sense decrying the violence. There are songs that seem to include his/narrator's battle cry ("your days are numbered" from When the Ship Comes In), but they feel symbolic and anyway not bloody, not vicious.

Joey: I think people are embarrassed by it. I know I think it's ridiculous. It feels naive; it's hero worship for the good-hearted bad guy. I read the the Folsom book called The Mad Ones about Gallo and he is sympathetic but not a saint. But it doesn't so much glorify violence as try to paint over it. Joey comes off as a rough guy from a rough place that never really meant nobody no harm. As the early 60s, he's a product of an environment. It's not his fault.

But in the later works (maybe starting in GAIBTY), the stories are bloodier, the characters are menacing, and there is senseless killing that is not being protested (even Delia is not a protest against the cuckolded killer, just his lament), nor is the violence being whitewashed. The violence is described plainly, in its brutality. And it seems far more focused on ineradicable evil and violence in the heart of all men (women are evil and treacherous -- hooking up with Don Pasquale while he's home?). So, the evil and violence are in each individual and only in that sense universal. It's not systemic violence. It's not dispersed through societies or conditions. He is now writing about person to person violence (and something like rape appears much more often... a kind of pre-70s macho "take a woman" thing). So, in L&T and MT (TTL too, but it's so weak that it isn't affecting), the narrators are not just describing killing, they're threatening to kill or actually killing (Lonesome Day Blues, High Water, Thunder On the Mountain even).

I think this whole thing is rooted in Dylan's religiosity -- a wicked heart that is essentially sinful and weak and craven. That's the world -- it feels like that's the optic, the magnification at which Dylan is operating. A bunch of sick and sinful men, some of whom may be trying very hard to be good, but never that far away from doing something terrible (trying to stay out of a life of perpetual crime, I pretty sure she'll make me kill some one). And so, all these killers and rapists (more or less) and thieves and brutes are the real face of humanity. Got to keep them in front of you. Can't forget. That's what's real.

And I think that brings him around and has him facing off against the whole self-critique of traditional masculinity that has as its apotheosis Kurt Cobain. No one was ever more aware of violence and a craven soul than him in pop music, but he loathed that about himself and saw those impulses as despicable but somehow belonging to the past. That's the key: the fraternity boy who gets in fights and date rapes or actually rapes women is an anachronism to him. He has disowned that part of himself. He feels better than that. Thus his comments about having the wrong fans, attacking misinterpretations of Polly, and feminizing his personality. Violence is social and can be quelled. It can be criticized away. That is what it means to be educated (school or no), white (colonial/post-colonial) and liberal (in the sense of believing in social causes and solutions to problems). The whole leading edge of 80s and 90s white pop sensibility was one of attacking masculinity. Everywhere except in Hip Hop (and dumb arena rock, which Cobain-ites see as anachronistic).

If a certain leading-edge white masculinity was in a meaningful sense self-loathing and self-effacing (out of an optimism about fixing itself, it must be noted), that was not a thing in Hip Hop. The opposite attitude seemed to reign in the mainstream. That is certainly not universal, and even someone as marginally engaged with hip hop and rap in the 80s and 90s as me can name counter-examples. And, I should note recently there seem, to my even more marginal ears, to be more prominent aspects of hip hop that go against my claim. Still, mainstream rap and hip hop in the 80s and 90s (though that seems to continue and even get more radical in the following decades) presented more macho, a more traditionally masculine attitudes toward violence. The bravado and aggressiveness of rap lyrics (including in the political, or 'conscious') ran counter to the anti-masculine-as-macho ideal of 'alternative' or leading-edge rock. In part, I thought that the relative difference in positions of power could help explain that divergence -- I don't know.. Perhaps there could be a opposition: the self-critique of the historically colonial, racist, paternalistic and misogynist position vs. the struggle to assert oneself against those who operated and benefited from the systems of oppression. The aggressive and violent narrator that hasn't disarmed, hasn't eschewed violence.

Dylan operates in neither of these 80s and 90s modes of expression of masculinity.

As for 'am I troubled by it vis a vis Joey?': Only as much and insofar as I am troubled by his vision of sin (in RIck's terms).

I don't see things the way Dylan does. Not in his terms.

And I alternate between feeling as though those times when the narrator says 'I' will shoot, kill, x, fight etc I am (a) confronted with the ridiculous boasts of an old man pretending to a virility he never had, and other times (b) seeing them as kind of mythic statements of human drives, statements that strip all the baroque social structure away from those primordial drives, making them some how revelatory.

In the end: I don't know....


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 12:59 GMT 
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SirDogg wrote:
Ding dong daddy?!


from Dumas, isn't it? Louis Armstrong?


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 13:27 GMT 
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MMD wrote:
hana wrote:
I can see the violence but I don´t see any glorification of it...




BennyBoy's questions as to whether there is increasing violence in ModBob (as he calls the post TOOM era) and its relation to earlier songs like Joey are tough for me to answer. But I think he is on to something. I am not sure where I stand ultimately on it, but he's made me think it through a bit. Here's a stab at an answer:

This is just a first pass. I've got a simple answer and a less simple one.

Simple answer: yes, recent songs are more directly, person to person violent (sexually and otherwise). I think that's tied to his rejection of the importance and value of social powers and institutions. You might call it feudal, I'd agree but only if you meant something like: a veneer of order and legitimacy masking brute power as the only real foundation for authority and a general chaotic violence that is never really subdued (despite all the talk of the King's Peace). It may be better to call it primordial or primitive. I think his world view is much, much starker now than it has been. Men are inherently and ineradicably evil and violent (women are evil and treacherous and violent when possible). Systems and institutions are really just instruments of someone's evil and violent desires. Contrast that with the way violence get's explained in the early 60s (Only A Pawn, e.g.). Violence is systemic and in some sense abstract. Even Hattie Carroll is a symbol as is the killer. And there is always a kind of possibility of confronting and stopping that violence. Masters of War is the counter example to this -- like when it ceases to be 'Society' at fault and it's a bunch of guys Dylan wants to personally see dead. But even then, its not a guy named Mike that he's going to kill himself.

Longer answer:
There is no doubt that there is some kind of affinity for violence in his work since L&T. Keep in mind that I am nowhere near as engaged with Dylan's work as BennyBoy and others here are, and so I don't know in any really systematic and comprehensive way how that violence compares to the albums that preceded L&T. But, I have listened to them all (I think).

First, to clear up 'affinity' -- there's plenty of violence in his work going all the way back: murders, assassinations, wars and battles. But often, especially early on, he is in some meaningful sense decrying the violence. There are songs that seem to include his/narrator's battle cry ("your days are numbered" from When the Ship Comes In), but they feel symbolic and anyway not bloody, not vicious.

Joey: I think people are embarrassed by it. I know I think it's ridiculous. It feels naive; it's hero worship for the good-hearted bad guy. I read the the Folsom book called The Mad Ones about Gallo and he is sympathetic but not a saint. But it doesn't so much glorify violence as try to paint over it. Joey comes off as a rough guy from a rough place that never really meant nobody no harm. As the early 60s, he's a product of an environment. It's not his fault.

But in the later works (maybe starting in GAIBTY), the stories are bloodier, the characters are menacing, and there is senseless killing that is not being protested (even Delia is not a protest against the cuckolded killer, just his lament), nor is the violence being whitewashed. The violence is described plainly, in its brutality. And it seems far more focused on ineradicable evil and violence in the heart of all men (women are evil and treacherous -- hooking up with Don Pasquale while he's home?). So, the evil and violence are in each individual and only in that sense universal. It's not systemic violence. It's not dispersed through societies or conditions. He is now writing about person to person violence (and something like rape appears much more often... a kind of pre-70s macho "take a woman" thing). So, in L&T and MT (TTL too, but it's so weak that it isn't affecting), the narrators are not just describing killing, they're threatening to kill or actually killing (Lonesome Day Blues, High Water, Thunder On the Mountain even).

I think this whole thing is rooted in Dylan's religiosity -- a wicked heart that is essentially sinful and weak and craven. That's the world -- it feels like that's the optic, the magnification at which Dylan is operating. A bunch of sick and sinful men, some of whom may be trying very hard to be good, but never that far away from doing something terrible (trying to stay out of a life of perpetual crime, I pretty sure she'll make me kill some one). And so, all these killers and rapists (more or less) and thieves and brutes are the real face of humanity. Got to keep them in front of you. Can't forget. That's what's real.

And I think that brings him around and has him facing off against the whole self-critique of traditional masculinity that has as its apotheosis Kurt Cobain. No one was ever more aware of violence and a craven soul than him in pop music, but he loathed that about himself and saw those impulses as despicable but somehow belonging to the past. That's the key: the fraternity boy who gets in fights and date rapes or actually rapes women is an anachronism to him. He has disowned that part of himself. He feels better than that. Thus his comments about having the wrong fans, attacking misinterpretations of Polly, and feminizing his personality. Violence is social and can be quelled. It can be criticized away. That is what it means to be educated (school or no), white (colonial/post-colonial) and liberal (in the sense of believing in social causes and solutions to problems). The whole leading edge of 80s and 90s white pop sensibility was one of attacking masculinity. Everywhere except in Hip Hop (and dumb arena rock, which Cobain-ites see as anachronistic).

If a certain leading-edge white masculinity was in a meaningful sense self-loathing and self-effacing (out of an optimism about fixing itself, it must be noted), that was not a thing in Hip Hop. The opposite attitude seemed to reign in the mainstream. That is certainly not universal, and even someone as marginally engaged with hip hop and rap in the 80s and 90s as me can name counter-examples. And, I should note recently there seem, to my even more marginal ears, to be more prominent aspects of hip hop that go against my claim. Still, mainstream rap and hip hop in the 80s and 90s (though that seems to continue and even get more radical in the following decades) presented more macho, a more traditionally masculine attitudes toward violence. The bravado and aggressiveness of rap lyrics (including in the political, or 'conscious') ran counter to the anti-masculine-as-macho ideal of 'alternative' or leading-edge rock. In part, I thought that the relative difference in positions of power could help explain that divergence -- I don't know.. Perhaps there could be a opposition: the self-critique of the historically colonial, racist, paternalistic and misogynist position vs. the struggle to assert oneself against those who operated and benefited from the systems of oppression. The aggressive and violent narrator that hasn't disarmed, hasn't eschewed violence.

Dylan operates in neither of these 80s and 90s modes of expression of masculinity.

As for 'am I troubled by it vis a vis Joey?': Only as much and insofar as I am troubled by his vision of sin (in RIck's terms).

I don't see things the way Dylan does. Not in his terms.

And I alternate between feeling as though those times when the narrator says 'I' will shoot, kill, x, fight etc I am (a) confronted with the ridiculous boasts of an old man pretending to a virility he never had, and other times (b) seeing them as kind of mythic statements of human drives, statements that strip all the baroque social structure away from those primordial drives, making them some how revelatory.

In the end: I don't know....



Great post.

I also wonder about this. The violence existed in earlier songs but while it was gruesome, it was usually presented as something to fight that could hopefully be 'cured' or otherwise dispensed with through a universal understanding and remedying of societal wrongs.

That's gone now. I agree there is a focus on violence as personal, person-to-person interaction and often without any understandable causation (I loved that "she is going to make me kill someone.."). I loved the songs on GIABTY and WGW and perhaps those were an influence and also this may indeed have something to do with the black/white of his apocalyptic Gospel period, where you were damned or saved, nothing in between was possible. This could be an incorporation of that p.o.v. which isn't necessarily about religion anymore, but simply a new understanding of evil as the permanent and driving force affecting all human interactions. Whatever inspired this, I think we are now getting much darker work from Dylan than we ever had before. In his earlier work, hope was always there, no matter how bad things were. Hope has been vanquished in his work now.

This may be a personal trope for Dylan now, or it might be an aesthetic choice to create a mythic and universal landscape he wishes to present as steeped in violence (this reminds me of Cormac McCarthy, who of course is not in favor of violence, but it's the primary color of his palette). Who knows - he might find a whole new audience in aficionados of rap music who respond to the petty level of the violence and the denigration and hostility towards women. I'm not condemning him for this, he's obviously allowed to assume any voice and attitude that he believes suits his work and I don't assume this is 'about' Dylan anymore than "Your Funeral and My Trial" was a reflection of the inner world of Sonny Boy Williamson. But it seems accurate that the past decade has given us a bleaker Dylan who is writing about a more corrosive world than he presented in the past. Perhaps this vision is what is truthful to him now. Or it might be something simpler, like evil and violence being energizing subject matter these days. Can't say whether or not this is only in the service of art or Bob Dylan is 'breaking bad.'


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 13:33 GMT 
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i can dress up your wounds
with a blood clotted rag
i ain't afraid to make love
to a bitch or a hag
if you see me comin'
and your standin' there
wave your hankerchief
in the air
i ain't dead yet
my bell still rings
i keep my fingers crossed
like the early roman kings

i can strip you of life
strip you of breath
ship you down
to the house of death
one day
you will ask for me
they'll be no one else
that you'll wanna see
bring down my fiddle
tune up my strings
i'm gonna break it wide open
like the early roman kings

Dylan as Don Corleone. I have a long answer coming soon to the above questions raised, but the short version is this:

Empathy and compassion have withered in the heart of the songs.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:01 GMT 
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This song sounds like soundtrack fodder to me. The riff would work dropping in and out of an action movie, with a verse here and there. As a standalone listening experience, it doesn't cut the mustard.

The lyrics sound like they refer to a movie, too. (Maybe one that never got made?) It reminds me more of Band of the Hand than Joey.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:05 GMT 
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SirDogg wrote:
Ding dong daddy?!


You're coming up short!


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:09 GMT 
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Bennyboy wrote:
What - you think it's better than 'Jolene'?

Only kidding.


Jolene is a great song*




*to take a nap to on a lazy Sunday afternoon.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:10 GMT 
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A short, incomplete list on people being killed in Dylan's songs before TOOM
And of course it's all about violence.

Willie Rambling, Gambling, Willie
Emmett Till The Death Of Emmett Till
A man Ballad Of Donald White
Young people Masters Of War
Davey Moore Who Killed Davey Moore?
Old Reilley Seven Curses
Seven People Ballad Of Hollis Brown
Indians,
Countless dead
6 million With God On Our Side
Medgar Evers Only A Pawn In Their Game
The Foes When The Ship Comes In
Hattie Carroll The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll
A Hobo Only A Hobo
Four Persons Percy’s Song
St. Augustine I dreamed I Saw St. Augustine
Frankie Lee The Ballad Of Frankie Lee And Judas Priest
George Jackson George Jackson
Mr. Gray Idiot Wind
Big Jim, Lily Lily, Rosemary And The Jack Of Hearts
Three Bodies Hurricane
The Rivals, Joey Joey
Ramon Romance In Durango
Luzifer New Pony
The Innocent,
Nuns and Soldiers The Groom’s Still Waiting At The Altar
Clean Cut Kid Clean Cut Kid
The Gunfighter Brownsville Girl


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:10 GMT 
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Excellent Posts, MMD & Rev - & an excellent question to ponder BBoy!

Welcome back Tragos! I was scared you were fallen during the EuropeanTourBattles.

Great list, RWasser...They Killed Him is conspicuously missing! Don't tell me you don't have Knocked out Loaded!!!


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:22 GMT 
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Troubadour64 wrote:
Excellent Posts, MMD & Rev - & an excellent question to ponder BBoy!

Welcome back Tragos! I was scared you were fallen during the EuropeanTourBattles.

Great list, RWasser...They Killed Him is conspicuously missing! Don't tell me you don't have Knocked out Loaded!!!



My fault, I had no intention to mention Jesus and Gandhi and King slipped my mind. There will be others I forgot, too.


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:29 GMT 
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rwasser wrote:
A short, incomplete list on people being killed in Dylan's songs before TOOM
And of course it's all about violence.

Willie Rambling, Gambling, Willie
Emmett Till The Death Of Emmett Till
A man Ballad Of Donald White
Young people Masters Of War
Davey Moore Who Killed Davey Moore?
Old Reilley Seven Curses
Seven People Ballad Of Hollis Brown
Indians,
Countless dead
6 million With God On Our Side
Medgar Evers Only A Pawn In Their Game
The Foes When The Ship Comes In
Hattie Carroll The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll
A Hobo Only A Hobo
Four Persons Percy’s Song
St. Augustine I dreamed I Saw St. Augustine
Frankie Lee The Ballad Of Frankie Lee And Judas Priest
George Jackson George Jackson
Mr. Gray Idiot Wind
Big Jim, Lily Lily, Rosemary And The Jack Of Hearts
Three Bodies Hurricane
The Rivals, Joey Joey
Ramon Romance In Durango
Luzifer New Pony
The Innocent,
Nuns and Soldiers The Groom’s Still Waiting At The Altar
Clean Cut Kid Clean Cut Kid
The Gunfighter Brownsville Girl



How many of these have first person narrators committing the murders, or threatening violence/mutilation/chinese burns?


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PostPosted: Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:34 GMT 
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rwasser wrote:
A short, incomplete list on people being killed in Dylan's songs before TOOM
And of course it's all about violence.

Willie Rambling, Gambling, Willie
Emmett Till The Death Of Emmett Till
A man Ballad Of Donald White
Young people Masters Of War
Davey Moore Who Killed Davey Moore?
Old Reilley Seven Curses
Seven People Ballad Of Hollis Brown
Indians,
Countless dead
6 million With God On Our Side
Medgar Evers Only A Pawn In Their Game
The Foes When The Ship Comes In
Hattie Carroll The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll
A Hobo Only A Hobo
Four Persons Percy’s Song
St. Augustine I dreamed I Saw St. Augustine
Frankie Lee The Ballad Of Frankie Lee And Judas Priest
George Jackson George Jackson
Mr. Gray Idiot Wind
Big Jim, Lily Lily, Rosemary And The Jack Of Hearts
Three Bodies Hurricane
The Rivals, Joey Joey
Ramon Romance In Durango
Luzifer New Pony
The Innocent,
Nuns and Soldiers The Groom’s Still Waiting At The Altar
Clean Cut Kid Clean Cut Kid
The Gunfighter Brownsville Girl


:wink:
how about them old folk songs he's kin to? like jim jones, arthur mcbride, blood in my eyes. the attempted murder in Candiee i o? hey joe. frankie and johnnie. go stako lee turns out bob invented beer in a bottle. :shock:


Last edited by goombay on Thu August 9th, 2012, 14:37 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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