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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 11:25 GMT 
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MMD wrote:
chrome horse wrote:
This is exactly where I fall in this debate.... For me, and as you have so clearly shown here, it only further intensifies the "wow factor" of this unbelievably gifted individual.


Thanks for the kind words chrome horse and raging_glory.

Raging and Darwin, am I right that there have long been rumors (I can't recall if any had good sources) that Dylan kept a box of passages from texts? I remember a story (again, no sense of source) that Dylan arrived at a meeting with someone with this box (or boxes) to start writing -- maybe it was Masked and Anonymous.

I don't have boxes, myself. I have notebooks. Lots of them. Full of copied passages and notes. But, if it were a box of merely good-sounding, but unorganized lines and passages, this would be hard to do much with besides to kind of slapdash plug in, cut up thing that many do accuse Dylan of. But if Dylan did what most writers do, and had interests in themes and ideas, and he kept those notes organized, then because the themes would be recurring (as they are in his work) quite a bit could be done by looking through the categories of notes.

As for Chronicles and memory -- just a little point: I was originally incredulous about the seeming absolute recall Dylan was implying he had about his conversations and impressions from as far back as 1961 (the account of reading in the friends apartment at which he slept, and the conversation with MacLeish are the two I remember noting first). But, of course, it has turned out that many of these seemingly photographically recalled scenes and conversations were constructed from outside sources -- in the case of MacLeish, from his own poem (and accidentally, it is claimed, Sandburgs introduction to the poems).

Finally, wouldn't co-writers (especially recent ones) be important for answering raging's question?

Good night all.


There's this recent interview with Larry Charles in the Star tribune : http://www.startribune.com/entertainmen ... 14935.html

"If you can believe it he was actually interested initially in doing a TV series, like an HBO series. He wanted it to be a comedy, so I went to a meeting with him. I thought, I'll have one meeting with him and I can tell all my friends I had a meeting with Bob Dylan, how cool would that be? I thought that would be the end of it but instead we totally hit it off right off the bat.

"The first thing he did, and this gives an illustration of how his mind works, he had this box on the table. He opened it and dumped out the box. It was all these little scraps of paper, stationery from all around the world. And on each scrap of paper was an aphorism or a line or a name of somebody. He dumped it out and said, 'I don't know what to do with all this.'

"I started looking and I said, 'This can be a line of dialog. And this could be the person's name who says the dialog.' He was like, 'You can do that?' I said, 'Yeah.' And I realized that's how he writes songs. He has all these fragments and he weaves the fragments until they become poetry. It's kind of automatic writing or the cut-up technique William Burroughs used. That's how we started to write that script actually. It was a very organic, very stream of consciousness process."


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 11:44 GMT 
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I was thinking that I had read the bit about the box of notes here in this interview with Larry Charles but apparently not. It is however, a very insightful interview:
http://trevgibbfilmmusic.blogspot.com/2 ... arles.html

Yeah, the ‘Confessions of a Yakuza’… Yeah, well a couple of things about Bob: First of all, he is like one of the last of the well-read people, you know what I mean? He’s so well read and well read in the sense that he can quote anything. He can quote the Bible, he can quote Rimbaud, he can quote Yeats, he can quote whatever it is and he has just a really innate knowledge of literature, no matter what the source, in many different languages also. By the same token, he is constantly… he has these fragments, these bits rolling round in his head all the time and he’s constantly – almost like a roulette wheel – trying different bits together and seeing what happens and so when people say, “Oh this is from ‘Confessions of a Yakuza’, I think he laughs, because he’s taken a totally non-poetic sentence, perhaps out of the middle of a paragraph of ‘Confessions of a Yakuza’ and turned it into art


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 11:49 GMT 

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I think Scott does great work. His contributions are always worth reading.

That said, I think the phenomenon of Dylan's rich sources and the way he uses them to cobble together his own narrative is largely misinterpreted. I think "vast, encoded subtext" vs. "he just liked the way it sounded" is a false choice.

I think that so much of Bob's work can be understood in reference to what kind of person he is and his relationship to words. Words are everything for people like Bob--they have a natural aptitude for and inclination toward them--but when it comes to actual conversation/writing/etc., they tend to produce a soup of quanta which are drawn from things they have previously heard or read. Now, I wouldn't suggest that Bob is unaware of his being this type of person. I think that, as far as these people go, Bob has a reasonable amount of self-awareness, and I assume that he's fully aware of his inborn M.O. and (especially later in his career) purposefully aligns himself with this personal Logos in order to produce stuff like Love and Theft, Chronicles, etc.

That said, I think there are only two "levels" to any given quanta: what it means in the context Bob's using it in (face value) and the interesting/funny/clever twist that the source gives. For instance, the bit about his guitar playing style and the "charlatan" sourcing. To anyone who has actually heard Bob solo on guitar, it's obvious that he basically fakes it, his "style" being a crude, abrasive noodling that may or may not be in the same key the rest of the band is playing in (although in recent years it seems like his occasional turns on guitar are a little more "put together" or planned...this wasn't the case at the time Chronicles was written/released, though).

The Lonnie Johnson stuff is quite obviously nonsense, although it passes as a New Agey, "put the bong down" description of Bob's guitar soloing. But when you consider the "charlatan" source, it becomes a simple gnostic, two-level structure where you're in on the joke or not. And this is where I think Scott provides an outstanding service. But to then build higher, more general levels of meaning between this quanta and that...that I think is a plainly fruitless endeavor, unless you're interested in writing fiction.

I think it all kinda hangs together nicely--Rome, Civil War, Carnivals, religious symbolism, shady characters, etc. because it all reflects the interests of a single person. Bob's a cool, interesting guy who's into cool, interesting stuff. Of course he's alluding to Rome...Rome is, like, one of the most interesting things ever. Does he draw connections between the quanta--does he sit there and think about how his referencing the Civil War in a certain way relates to his referencing Christ elsewhere? Probably. But, while parsing out the sources (and that second, "gnostic" level I mentioned) is in many cases a practically scientific endeavor with testable results, parsing out higher levels of interconnectedness...well, it might make for some interesting writing, but I for one have no interest in it. I would no sooner read "fanfics" based on a comic book or TV show I liked. You may as well sit down and write an original essay wholly unrelated to Bob.


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 13:02 GMT 
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raging_glory wrote:
Wonderful post MMD!

I have a question that I guess no one can really answer but I have been thinking about this for a while. I can't imagine anyone writing a cohesive song, much less a memoir while sitting with books open and referencing texts. Is it possible then, that this multitude of passages are culled from memory?

Whatever may be going on, I feel like I am witnessing something very important.

I think it may well be a combination of both . I remember from my essay writing days I would make my notes from references and my own opinions then when I was completing the essay I would do a combination of writing from memory and consulting my sources to check on accuracy.
While Dylan is not writing an essay he may well need to check out things as he writes.


Last edited by oldmanemu on Wed June 20th, 2012, 13:18 GMT, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 13:07 GMT 

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oldmanemu wrote:
raging_glory wrote:
Wonderful post MMD!

I have a question that I guess no one can really answer but I have been thinking about this for a while. I can't imagine anyone writing a cohesive song, much less a memoir while sitting with books open and referencing texts. Is it possible then, that this multitude of passages are culled from memory?

Whatever may be going on, I feel like I am witnessing something very important.

I think it may well be a combination of both . I remember from my essay writing days I would make my notes from references and my own opinions then when I was completing the essay I would do a combination of writing from memerory and cosulting my sources to check on accuracy.
While Dylan is not writing an essay he may well need to check out things as he writed.


If the way he edited Eat the document and Renaldo & Clara is an indication, he used multiple labels for "topics", and has a way for cross-checking them. It's not that difficult to do.
I am still very busy wrapping up some work, but the topic is great and I'll try to contribute ASAP.


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 17:51 GMT 
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MMD wrote:
My point is that it would be crazy, amazing, and shocking because while he is beloved as an American musician -- certainly by American and global musicians, but also by a very large fan base across the world -- and while he is seen as among the most literate of song-writers, whenever he is mentioned in the context of the Noble for lit., it is usually said that he is not a real, sufficiently sophisticated artist. He is just a poetic pop-song writer. Big fish, little pond.

If Dylan has constructed these intricate songs and texts, then he becomes a whole different kind of artist.

That's why it's worth pursuing. Just in case, Dylan has quietly become a this kind of artist -- or has been for a while. That's worth checking out, I think,

Very interesting thought.... and then another question is: If he is doing this, has it always been there, or when did it start....???

From very early on he was known to take subjects from newspaper articles..... and then just before BOTT he learned to do consciously what he had done un-consciously before.....in other words intentionally.... Add to that another 40 years of the little magpie picking up ideas and words along the way.... I do think that he knows that someone will follow things back to the sources..... to think that he really believes no one will notice is just silly.... (we notice when he changes his way of walking across the stage :lol: ).... But to think that for years now he has been planting things in songs and his books is just really amazing.... not that I am not ready to totally believe it to be true! But it certainly would raise things to another level. As to the co-writer question.... wouldn't it just be a co-writer in person instead of in print so to speak.... another source of possibilities...

To MMD: hitting them out of the park.... keep it up!


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 17:53 GMT 
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Does anyone know if scottw has found anything from Cicero in Dylan's work?


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 20:46 GMT 

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For my part, I try to see what is a complex and fascinating technique (or project, if we hold that much in it is absolutely intentional and has long-term consequences) as a way to create a connection that simultaneously affects the image of "America" that Dylan is trying to build, and the image of "Bob Dylan" himself (call it a star-image, an artistic reputation, or a performance persona). References and dialogic incorporation, intertextuality, are fundamental pillars in the pursuing of these projects, remaking the musical vision of America through the recreation of Dylan's own image as an artist.

For those of us who attended Dylan's shows in the early 1990s (gee! It was 20 years ago) we were often forced to see an artist who had lost his track, glimpses of greatness appearing every now and then, but nothing compared to what was going to resurface by the end of the 1990s. I think that this is a crucial point to understand the problem of incorporation, of a new style of songwriting, and of the prominence it has acquired in Dylan's late career.

At some point, mostly in performance and during the NET (and that is one of the reasons why I am so fascinated by it) Dylan started to rebuild his presentation as an artist moving from the periphery of what "Bob Dylan" was supposed to be for his audience, critics, and the press. New arrangements, the logic of the NET, which meant disappearing from the world of tours as rock "events", the engagement with tradition (GAIBTY and WGW, the covers), were all means to work in and around representations that had very little to do with Bob Dylan's established image. This was refreshing, as Dylan really started to get his groove back (intertextual reference: David Yaffe) from 1994 onwards. Just a few years before Time Out of Mind, which was a real turning point.

This allowed Dylan to achieve a major objective, to avoid nostalgia while being able to rely on the (somewhat) progressive narrative that had been constructed around him, according to which he was always "moving forward". Having avoided nostalgia, the pressure to sound as in the past, the expectations coming from the audience, Dylan was relatively free to exploit narratives and projects that had been present all his life (except for a brief period in the mid-1960s), namely the reworking and the reconfiguration of the whole landscape of American popular music. As such this is a project that predates "rock" and in some respect goes against it. It is as if, with music, Dylan tried to show the audience the whole foundations upon which contemporary American music stood.

This is the double "memory project" to which I refer. By being involved in this project of reconfiguration of Americana, Dylan had to move from the periphery, in some ways de-centering the representation of the artist and bringing peripheries in, the periphery of American vernacular music, but also the periphery of Bob Dylan.

I take incorporations (textual incorporations) as being a part of this wider process. So, I cannot see in them an endogenous game (leaving clues for a message whose author, in the end, is still Dylan, who tries to let the illuminati know that there is something below the test), but a sort of reaching out by taking in, integrating in the role of the artist a wider (and burdensome) collective memory.
To me, thus, finding the source - as much as I enjoy doing it sometimes, and as much as I admire those who do it - is less an end in itself, than a way to reconstruct the nuances and the concrete operations that make this memory-work possible.
For example, while I know (as a listener or a reader), that there is that verse in Lonesome Day Blues about teaching peace to the conquered and taming the proud, I also know that whenever I listen to "Love and Theft", somewhere I hear the line "I am going to establish my rule through civil war". The point is, what civil war am I thinking about? One in which there is a choice to spare the defeated? and what resonances does this juxtaposition create when one has the impression that what the singer seems to sing about is in the end an idea of "America"?

To me, then, finding or discussing these sources is less an end in itself, a more a confirmation of this ongoing discourse about culture (and especially vernacular culture).


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 21:06 GMT 

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andrea75 wrote:
This allowed Dylan to achieve a major objective, to avoid nostalgia while being able to rely on the (somewhat) progressive narrative that had been constructed around him, according to which he was always "moving forward".


I don't know. That is what I call gobbelygook. It's the sound of a pseudo intellectual trying to sound informed about a subject in very flowery words - but not really saying anything. Good effort though. Or maybe I'm just stupid and don't get it?


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 22:20 GMT 

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chrome horse wrote:
andrea75 wrote:
This allowed Dylan to achieve a major objective, to avoid nostalgia while being able to rely on the (somewhat) progressive narrative that had been constructed around him, according to which he was always "moving forward".


I don't know. That is what I call gobbelygook. It's the sound of a pseudo intellectual trying to sound informed about a subject in very flowery words - but not really saying anything. Good effort though. Or maybe I'm just stupid and don't get it?


It's been an interesting thread so far, and everybody has shown respect for other people's opinions. Please keep it like that.


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 23:44 GMT 
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Yes, there are civil ways to disagree, even strongly. And this thing is going to require people putting themselves out there, open to criticism is a pretty serious way if it going to be worth reading at all. So, I have been guilty of being harsh on this site in the past. I've decided that if I'm going to come here, I won't let myself do it anymore.

We're all big boys and girls and have to be willing to take our lumps, but let's do it old-world style and put a a little charm into our criticisms, if we must make them. It's harder to do, and funner.

Not really related, but important:
Finally, there is a language that academics (and of course every field) develops (jargon) that is actually just a short cut. It's a way of saying a lot (a complicated idea) without having to explain it every time, not having to distinguish it from the more common meanings of typically used words (say 'intertextuality' vs 'quoting'). I know that it is useful, and I use it all the time. I received some sage advice about keeping my jargon to a minimum here to avoid making it hard for others (who have their own jargon from their own fields) to follow what I am saying. I will do my best. I promise, that if I get jargony, it's because I got lazy about it or unconsciously left it in. I know I barely understand audiophiles when they talk about formats or equipment, or when doctors, lawyers, mechanics, financiers do it.

I'm working on a song reading. Hope to have it up soon.

Thanks to all for their posts.


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PostPosted: Wed June 20th, 2012, 23:57 GMT 
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MMD wrote:
I received some sage advice about keeping my jargon to a minimum here to avoid making it hard for others (who have their own jargon from their own fields) to follow what I am saying. I will do my best.


You are doing a fine job, MMD - even I have understood what you're saying and continue to be very excited about your future postings - and the input of other ER members on this subject.
Thank you for what you've opened my eyes to and for what I believe will continue in the future.
doomed


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 04:23 GMT 
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MMD wrote:
Yes, there are civil ways to disagree, even strongly. And this thing is going to require people putting themselves out there, open to criticism is a pretty serious way if it going to be worth reading at all. So, I have been guilty of being harsh on this site in the past. I've decided that if I'm going to come here, I won't let myself do it anymore.

We're all big boys and girls and have to be willing to take our lumps, but let's do it old-world style and put a a little charm into our criticisms, if we must make them. It's harder to do, and funner.

Not really related, but important:
Finally, there is a language that academics (and of course every field) develops (jargon) that is actually just a short cut. It's a way of saying a lot (a complicated idea) without having to explain it every time, not having to distinguish it from the more common meanings of typically used words (say 'intertextuality' vs 'quoting'). I know that it is useful, and I use it all the time. I received some sage advice about keeping my jargon to a minimum here to avoid making it hard for others (who have their own jargon from their own fields) to follow what I am saying. I will do my best. I promise, that if I get jargony, it's because I got lazy about it or unconsciously left it in. I know I barely understand audiophiles when they talk about formats or equipment, or when doctors, lawyers, mechanics, financiers do it.

I'm working on a song reading. Hope to have it up soon.

Thanks to all for their posts.


Thanks for everything in this post. I appreciate your thoughts on ettiquete and clarification on some of the terminology uses to discuss this topic.


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 04:38 GMT 
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"the game is the same - it's just on another level"


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 05:06 GMT 
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Just a reference note:
The R F Thomas article "The Streets of Rome" that I linked to at the journal Oral Tradition was published in Reception and the Classics (2012) by Cambridge University Press. http://www.cambridge.org/aus/catalogue/ ... 322&ss=ind if you are interested (Giada).


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 06:55 GMT 
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^
:D
Thanks. It's rather exciting to see Dylan sharing a book with the likes of Joyce and Petrarch.


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 07:39 GMT 
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There is a lot of sense being written in this thread, both on Dylan's creative methods and internet etiquette. I commend all the participants for both.


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 07:57 GMT 
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In a way who can blame Dylan if this is all an intricate game on his part. Many strange theories have emerged about him and his writings , some of which may be dismissed as myths and rumors.
While many interviewers have asked some stupid questions. That can blame some of his strange responses. However when the questions have been worthwhile his responses have good as in The Rome interview.
So I wonder was there a point where Dylan said to himself something like " I will put things there and see if they can find them".
Naturally like all game creators he is currently so far ahead of most of us.
Maybe this thread and the spirit in which we have so far approached it may give some of us an insight.


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 08:08 GMT 
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I have always had a sneaking suspicion that Bob's song Forever Young was about Izzy Young - the noted figure in the world of folk music, both in America and Sweden. Is there any evidence in the files? It's just a feeling I have that the song and the man are connected in some way. Call it a sixth sense if you like. Or in my case a fifth sense, as I lost the ability to smell after a bout against Troy The Surfing Wrestler in Santa Monica in 82.


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 09:44 GMT 
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mmd's post i thought made sense.


is every ER member a psycology major?


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 10:49 GMT 
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OK, this is long.

And it's part 1 of a 3 part assessment of the approaches of two main writers about Dylan's incorporation of other texts -- Warmuth and Thomas.

I thought I would post this as I continue working on actually interpreting a song, that is, trying to interpret the lyrics (for how I wish I was smart enough to think about the music in connection to the lyrics within this broad project).

Part of the my aim in doing this is to provide both a description of existing approaches, and to provide some analysis of them, to evaluate them, to critically assess them.

In the 3 parts, I’ll take two pieces by Warmuth, and then talk about the essay by Thomas I posted earlier.

In this post, I will deal a post from Warmuth's blog which is just a list of apparent incorporations of Jack London’s writing into Chronicles by Dylan. In the next post, I'll write a bit about an example of what Warmuth seems to mean by secret code in Dylan’s writing.

So....

The first: “Dylan Dossier: The Jack London FIle” which was posted on 5/9/2011 at his blog. http://swarmuth.blogspot.com/2011/05/dy ... -file.html

This is precisely the kind of contribution to coming to terms with Dylan’s incorporations that causes annoyance among members of this forum. It is a long, long list (59 entries) of passages from Chronicles with emphasized words, followed by a passage from a work by London with those exact or very similar words emphasized.

What can annoy (and probably what does annoy) people about this type of research is, I would think, two-fold:
(1) that it does not bother to make any kind of evaluation or interpretation about the worth or meaning of the supposed incorporations. On the face of it, submitted as it is, it looks like an indictment. It looks like an evidence file for a charge of plagiarism. It helps not at all that Warmuth titles the post precisely as if it were a criminal file (Overall Dossier on Dylan, File pertaining to activity around London).

(2) That is appears to be possible that some, many, or even all of the supposed borrowing from London could be just coincidental -- that they are just common phrases that occur in both. That is, at the beginning of the reading process, it is easy to think that Warmuth is fishing, that he is probably (somehow...how?) google searching London’s works against Dylan’s and happening to find common phrases and terms that happen to occur in both.

I won’t try to defend Warmuth against the first issue. There is some chance that Warmuth is a lawyer (googling his name turns up a personal-injury lawyer as the first and second results, his blog as the fourth) and it may just be that he is accustomed to making a case in this way. A professional hazard, let’s suppose, and not impute motives right away. But I will note that that tone and style of writing may contribute to the way in which his work is viewed and used as an indictment of Dylan as a plagiarist despite his regular insistence that he appreciates Dylan’s appropriations as a valid and exciting artistic method. It may even explain Wilentz (with whom Warmuth is often at odds in his blog) distancing himself from Warmuth’s work, defending Dylan against a perceived implication of plagiarism by Warmuth (see the closing paragraphs of http://swarmuth.blogspot.com/2011/04/ne ... dandy.html for an example).

As for the second, to dismiss Warmuth’s labors because the findings seem coincidental would be a mistake. I count 59 separate entries in the Jack London File. Each one cites a part of Chronicles and then locates the places in London’s writings where exact or similar phrases, words, or sentences can be found. There are far more that 59 words or phrases, but he’s divided them up into 59 incidents. 59. A few reasons why this can’t be dismissed as a coincidence:
(1) There are some of these passages that are unusual and lengthy enough to be highly likely instances of incorporations without needing to be tested too much further. These need to be treated as the foundation of an argument, a weight on the scale, rather than accepted and ruled out as uncontroversial. That is what we mostly do in an argument — we try to set aside the obvious, uncontroversial points. But in an argument that is based on mounting evidence, which this is, the fact that there are highly probably cases of incorporations is important. It makes the next type more probable.

(2) These are the phrases that while clearly present in both sets of texts, seem just as likely to be just written by Dylan as to be taken from London. They are exact matches, but seemingly common enough phrases. Despite the fact that we all would assume that it was quite certain that a combination of words (it has to be a combination), no matter how peculiar, would occur numerous times (or at least more than twice) in works in English (let’s say that appear in the google-able world), should you try it for yourself, you’ll see that it isn’t so. I tried this with a number of instances of supposed incorporations myself. I chose phrases that seemed common, typed them in, and came up with no other matches than those that Warmuth had. Mostly I found no matches at all, or only Warmuth’s blog.

(3) These two taken together make the instances in which the Chronicles phrase or word is not identical, but only very similar to London’s, far more likely to be cases of incorporation. That is, once Warmuth has proven a pattern of Dylan borrowing from London, he can, rightfully, argue that instances that we might otherwise dismiss on their own, are in fact taken from London.

Still, what is the purpose of this case that Dylan has taken text from London? Warmuth says exactly nothing about it. Except that he opens his post with an epigram from Edward de Bono: “Something may be noticed for the pure sake of noticing. There is no attempt to explain it at once, no attempt to give it an importance. The thing is just noticed. If it gives rise to an idea, then so much the better: if not, there is no attempt to wring an idea from it. Later on it might prove useful.”

That is, "all" Warmuth has done here is pile up evidence for his case, which -- depending on whether you listen to his claims or are swayed by his tone -- is either "for" or "against" Dylan. Clearly, Warmuth intends it to be in support of Dylan as a master puzzler. Later on, it will prove useful — in argumets with those who claim, against all evidence, that Dylan doesn’t incorporate texts from other authors, and hopefully, for future unravelling of the meanings created by those incorporations in Dylan’s texts.

That's up next. If these kinds of posts are not of interest, I will stop now and wait until I have finished the song.


One other thing about Warmuth: Leaving aside his polemical style, we must recognize and appreciate the labor that seems to have gone into running not just these, but countless other incorporations, down — Time Magazine, NY Times Magazine, Life Magazine, etc. Unless he has access to a database with all of these texts digitized as well as a fairly powerful search tool, he has done more than run a search engine to arrive at his massive Dossier of Dylan’s references. He deserves credit and appreciation for his efforts. If it turns out that all of this "evidence" is of real use later -- both for us and future Dylan fans -- that is, if all of these inter-textual connections end up greatly enhancing the meaning of Dylan's work, then he'll have done a tremendous service for Dylan's fans— even if most of them don’t know it yet


Last edited by MMD on Thu June 21st, 2012, 10:58 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 10:51 GMT 
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Sometimes I think that Bob has not changed his working methods -- he's just become impatient with the continued boneheaded misunderstanding of his songs so has become a bit more blatant in his methods.


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 10:54 GMT 

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MMD, as far as I know OUR Warmuth is a DJ.


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 11:02 GMT 
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andrea75 wrote:
MMD, as far as I know OUR Warmuth is a DJ.

Can I just say that he is DJ with the soul of a lawyer, then. And he's a good writer too.


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PostPosted: Thu June 21st, 2012, 11:16 GMT 

Joined: Wed February 16th, 2005, 21:50 GMT
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MMD wrote:

If these kinds of posts are not of interest, I will stop now and wait until I have finished the song.


You're joking, right? You have taken this supremely important subject to new heights! More more more.


My apologies to andrea75 for my earlier comment. I was greatly influenced earlier in life by caustic writing style of the late, great, Hunter Thompson(who was also a huge Bob Dylan fan), but I will try and refrain from using it again. As others have pointed out, and I totally agree, this is a great thread.


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