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 Post subject: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 12:47 GMT 
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Location: The mystic garden, outside the chelsea hotel, near Montague Street...
For me, his best harp work he's ever done is on John Wesley Harding, unbelievable harp playing.
Then i would say Blonde On Blonde

don't know after that. His playing the Bootleg series vol 4 1966, the acoustic side is amazing. the electric side is too :)


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 13:18 GMT 
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Great harp on You're A Big Girl Now - think that's what edges it over the Biograph outtake.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 13:44 GMT 
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Every grain of sand album version


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 13:45 GMT 
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What Can I Do For You studio version. Harp playing from the depths of his soul.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 13:57 GMT 
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I agree that he sounded good on Oh Mercy. But I think the best ever performance of a single song is "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" at Manchester in 1966. That playing sends chills up my spine.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 14:23 GMT 
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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 14:25 GMT 
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Mr Tambourine Man, Sheffield, 1966.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 15:12 GMT 
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John B. Stetson wrote:
Mr Tambourine Man, Sheffield, 1966.


Agreed. One of my favorites too.

Also, there's a scene in 'don't look back' when he's on a train and a live version of "don't think twice" is playing, there's an amazing harp solo in that, just incredible.

And then there's the "what can i do for you?" from Toronto 1980.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 15:59 GMT 

Joined: Sun March 29th, 2009, 04:38 GMT
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What's interesting and somewhat odd about Bob's harmonica playing is that in the first few albums, he does some really wonderful blues harmonica work, cross-harp style, (think of the very first song off the first album, in fact) - and he seems to have abandoned that sound after the first few albums, largely. THe harmonica playing in 65-66 is evocative and intoxicating in its own way, but not nearly as technically accomplished as that early work. And he's done some nice harp playing since (I saw 'what can i do for you' in '80 in person, in Albany, and it was fantastic) but it's still too bad he hasn't gone back to that cross-harp stuff he did so well way back when...

(cross-harp, by the way, is when you play, for example, a harmonica in the key of A while playing a song in the key of E- those bluesy notes , flatted thirds and sevenths, are emphasized)


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 16:00 GMT 
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What Can I Do for You? from Slow Train...


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 16:33 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
What Can I Do for You? from Slow Train...


Slow Train Coming doesn't have any harp (or indeed that song!) I don't think, but that's a very heartfelt solo.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 16:54 GMT 
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Trev wrote:
Untrodden Path wrote:
What Can I Do for You? from Slow Train...


Slow Train Coming doesn't have any harp (or indeed that song!) I don't think, but that's a very heartfelt solo.
:oops:

Make that Saved...


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 20:24 GMT 
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John B. Stetson wrote:
Mr Tambourine Man, Sheffield, 1966.

Even though I am not really into the '66 tour, I have to agree. Sheffield's "Tambourine Man" contains his best harp work! Absolutely brilliant!


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 20:29 GMT 
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mikesnyc wrote:
What's interesting and somewhat odd about Bob's harmonica playing is that in the first few albums, he does some really wonderful blues harmonica work, cross-harp style, (think of the very first song off the first album, in fact) - and he seems to have abandoned that sound after the first few albums, largely. THe harmonica playing in 65-66 is evocative and intoxicating in its own way, but not nearly as technically accomplished as that early work. And he's done some nice harp playing since (I saw 'what can i do for you' in '80 in person, in Albany, and it was fantastic) but it's still too bad he hasn't gone back to that cross-harp stuff he did so well way back when...

(cross-harp, by the way, is when you play, for example, a harmonica in the key of A while playing a song in the key of E- those bluesy notes , flatted thirds and sevenths, are emphasized)


nice observation - that technique could be really useful i think for anything post infidels. would like to have seen it in TOOM.

i was curious about that point, so i found this interesting reference:
http://dylanchords.info/harp/harpkeys.htm


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sat March 10th, 2012, 21:55 GMT 
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I think his center stage harp work from the last few years is his best.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sun March 11th, 2012, 17:06 GMT 
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Hm... 'What Can I Do For You,' live or in the studio, is probably my favorite Dylan harp work. Alternately, the playing on Tangled Up in Blue, on LP or in 2011, is pretty spectacular.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sun March 11th, 2012, 17:36 GMT 
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Isis_ wrote:
For me, his best harp work he's ever done is on John Wesley Harding, unbelievable harp playing.
Then i would say Blonde On Blonde

don't know after that. His playing the Bootleg series vol 4 1966, the acoustic side is amazing. the electric side is too :)


to me his best harp work is on the outtakes to Harry Belafonte's Midnight Special song... freaking awesome


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sun March 11th, 2012, 17:44 GMT 
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I'm not saying it's the 'best' - but the return of the harmonica to prominence for those final phrases after the guitar at the end of Spirit on the Water always gives me a twinge of joy.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sun March 11th, 2012, 20:15 GMT 
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speaking of harps and harmonicas --- how is it these terms are both used so frequently? was harp a colloquial term similar to the fiddle/violin relationship? or was there a period in time that the harmonica was called a harp so it just stuck? or is harmonica a modern term?


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Sun March 11th, 2012, 20:59 GMT 
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Troubadour64 wrote:
speaking of harps and harmonicas --- how is it these terms are both used so frequently? was harp a colloquial term similar to the fiddle/violin relationship? or was there a period in time that the harmonica was called a harp so it just stuck? or is harmonica a modern term?


Here's the etymology for those two words:

harmonica (n.); 1762, coined by Ben Franklin as the name for a glass harmonica, from L. fem. of harmonicus (see harmonic); modern sense of "mouth organ" is 1873, Amer.Eng., earlier harmonicon (1825).

harp (n.): Old English. hearpe, from P.Gmc. *kharpon- (cf. O.S. harpa "instrument of torture;" O.N. harpa, Du. harp, O.H.G. harpfa, Ger. Harfe "harp"). Late Latin harpa, source of words in some Romanic languages, is a borrowing from Germanic. Meaning "harmonica" is from 1887, short for mouth-harp. The harp seal (1784) is so called for the harp-shaped markings on its back.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Mon March 12th, 2012, 14:13 GMT 
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ahh....so h-a-r-m-o-n-i-c-a is american shorthand for mouth harp. what is wrong with us? :lol: :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Mon March 12th, 2012, 20:34 GMT 

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The first break in One Too Many Mornings always sends shivers down my spine.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Mon March 12th, 2012, 23:21 GMT 
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XRaylroad wrote:
John B. Stetson wrote:
Mr Tambourine Man, Sheffield, 1966.

Even though I am not really into the '66 tour, I have to agree. Sheffield's "Tambourine Man" contains his best harp work! Absolutely brilliant!


I'm going to call out the harp solo in Mr. Tambourine Man on the officially released Live 1966: The "Royal Albert Hall" at Manchester's Free Trade Hall. It is glorious!


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Mon March 12th, 2012, 23:26 GMT 
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I'm going to disagree...Sheffield rules the roost.


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 Post subject: Re: Best harp work
PostPosted: Mon March 12th, 2012, 23:32 GMT 
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smoke wrote:
I'm going to disagree...Sheffield rules the roost.


I Will have to check out Sheffield! thanks


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