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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 01:10 GMT 

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http://youtu.be/mns9VeRguys

Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like it's gonna sweep my world away
I'm gonna stop in Carbondale and keep on going
That Duquesne train gonna ride me night and day
You say I'm a gambler, you say I'm a pimp
But I ain't neither one
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Sounding like she's on a final run.

Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like she's never blowed before
Blue light blinking, red light blowing
Blowing like she's at my chamber door
You're smiling through the fence at me
Just like you always smiled before
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like she ain't gonna blow no more

Can't you hear that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like the sky is gonna blow apart
You're the only thing alive that keeps me going
You're like a time bomb in my heart
I can hear a sweet voice gently calling
Must be the mother of our Lord
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like my woman's on board

Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like it's gonna blow my blues away
You old rascal, I know exactly where you're going
I'll lead you there myself at the break of day
I wake up every morning with that woman in my bed
Everybody's telling me she's gone to my head
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like it's gonna kill me dead

Can't you hear that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing through another no good town
The lights of my native land are glowing
I wonder if they'll know me next time around
I wondered if that old oak tree's still standing
That old oak tree, the one we used to climb
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like she's blowing right on time


Kicking off Tempest, this song begins with that old-timey train music and once through, kicks into gear and sets us on our way. IMO, Bob's always been best at kicking off his albums and this is no exception. Of course, the train metaphor has been mined a-plenty by our man, but this one is interesting. It seems as if its on its final run, but it has the spirit of a youthful lust. It's nostalgic while being present...and it has a killer bass line:)

Speaking of which, it's been a real joy this past year with Bob on the road, sounding great, and showcasing his newest album. This song was certainly a highlight when I saw him in the summertime. And from the sound of it, it only got better in Europe.

Nearing the end of the tour, they really started to let it rip. Just listen to Tony
on this version from Italy....they transform in one song into a killer jazz combo:)
This is fantastic music here!!!

Padova Italy
November 8 2013
http://www.sendspace.com/file/ggp3n3

Another great one was from Hamburg (though the band was better than Bob here)
But there's some great video here so it all makes it awesome:)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1bus6Tl ... aa3_TaUQNw


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 01:18 GMT 
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Classic Dylan in so many ways... a song that gets better with every spin. Each live performance has been fantastic. The studio release starts with an ancient vibe, as if it were yesterday and the song slowly emerges into the present. Utterly brilliant marriage of tune to lyric and the execution is stunning!


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 01:27 GMT 
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It just started (Stockholm II, Crystal Cat) as I clicked to see this thread. Fate. Jack Fate.

I think Tony enjoys thrumming this one. There was a point in the Spring or Summer where it felt like this would take off up there with the Summer Days millennium jams...but the harness came out in Europe.

It's OK. I'd trade it for Narrow Way in a heartbeat though.

Dusquesne might be a good opener, actually.


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 01:43 GMT 
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What's with Dylan and trains? Did Hibbing have a depot or something?

I like this song, though. It's one of those tunes that makes me happy just to listen to it.


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 02:42 GMT 
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Chief Commander wrote:
What's with Dylan and trains? Did Hibbing have a depot or something?


Hibbing was the intersection of all thought, realization and culture, which is why it's native son is so well recognized.


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 03:02 GMT 
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I love this song. The intro to the recording sets such a perfect mood for the rest of the song.


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 03:25 GMT 

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Loved this track from the outset & the sheer passion continues on...... It makes me "move". The MEZ is a Duquesne Whistle "devotee". Such admiration for this track. MEZ


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 05:30 GMT 
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I'm a big, big fan of this song. Great way to kick off his newest album, and an all around great track.


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 08:18 GMT 
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Gloria Estefan was right. But even she couldn't have predicted that the rhythm was going to get me at the Royal Albert Hall. Duquesne made me jiggle provactively in my seat. Quite the display.


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PostPosted: Thu December 19th, 2013, 09:46 GMT 
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http://www.keesdegraaf.com/index.php/19 ... n-analysis

Bob Dylan's 'Duquesne Whistle' - an analysis-
‘Duquesne Whistle’ – lyric analysis – by Kees de Graaf

‘Duquesne Whistle’ the first song on Dylan’s new album ‘Tempest’- a co-write with Robert Hunter - is yet another masterpiece. This song is really amazing; there are many thoughtful layers in it. When you listen for the first time, the feel the lyrics of the song may evoke comes close to the song ‘Highlands’ from ‘Time out of Mind’. But there is a difference. ‘Highlands’ was a metaphor for heaven. Highlands portrays the mental attitude of the poet towards those Highlands. His heart is in the Highlands. At the same time it is a journey to the Highlands. It is a learning process. At the end of the song it is as if he already reached his destination: ‘I’m already there in my mind’. In this song the poet waits for and focusses on the final whistle which can be blown at any minute; this whistle when it comes proclaims that the end of times has begun and that there is no turning back. This whistle has a warning for us in store, like in the song ‘Sugar Baby’: ‘Look up, look up—seek your Maker—’fore Gabriel blows his horn’ or in this case his whistle. There can be no doubt: death is calling at the poet’s door, he is about to cross the borderline. Sometimes it looks as if he is already on the other side; he is in and out of the train bound for glory. It is a song depicting human mortality and vulnerability, yet hope is close by. Let’s take a more detailed look at the song to see how this works out.
‘Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like it’s gonna sweep my world away
I’m gonna stop at Carbondale, keep on going
That Duquesne train gonna ride me night and day’.
There is a place called Duquesne and Carbondale in Pennsylvania (PA), but the problem is that Dylan speaks of a ‘Duquesne train’ but these two towns appear not to have a train station. There is however a place called Carbondale in the south of Illinois which does have a train station. Carbondale is on the "City of New Orleans" train route which also passes through and stops in a town called DU QUOIN, IL, which is just north of Carbondale. This also raises a question. Dylan spells ‘Duquesne’ instead of ‘Du Quoin’ which is what one might expect here. But there appears to be no Duquesne in the state of Illinois. Although a press report in the New York Times of November 1921 reported from Duquesne (IL) that a train was hit by lightning just south of Pinckneyville, we found no evidence that there is Duquesne in Illinois and certainly not a Duquesne where there is a train station. Therefore, the question why Dylan chose to spell ‘Duquesne’ instead of Du Quoin is still open. Some resolve this issue by stating that ‘Duquesne’’ in Pennsylvania is meant here. The song is supposed to deal with the “Duquesne Works” steel mill, home to “Dorothy Six”, the largest blast furnace in the world. The Works, located in the Pennsylvania steel town of Duquesne, was once part of the Carnegie Steel Company. Dylan seems to have been inspired for this song by an article, “Business & Finance: Whistle”, TIME Magazine (Monday, June 26, 1933):– “Pennsylvania steel town, twelve miles up the Monongahela River from Pittsburgh. For two years its 21,000 inhabitants watched the tires die in the blast furnaces one by one. Then for two more years the furnaces were cold. Duquesne called it Depression. One day last week, Duquesne whistles shrieked, Duquesne bells clanged...”
The poet invites you to ‘Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing’. When you are on a train station, a few seconds before the train starts moving, the station master blows a whistle. Of course there are more occasions and rules for a train whistle to blow. You can find these on: http://www.sdrm.org/faqs/rulebook/signals.html. In this whistle the poet hears that something important and irreversible is about to happen. A whistle is ‘blown’ – air is blown through the whistle and you hear a sound. When you think about air, about wind, your attention is drawn to the Hebrew word ‘ruach’ or the Greek word ‘pneuma’, which means ‘air’ ‘wind’. The Holy Spirit is like a wind, a ‘ruach’ or a ‘pneuma’, a sort of inspiration that pervades everything. In this Duquesne whistle the poet hears a voice from high, the Holy Spirit, calling, blowing, that the end is near, the poet has reached the end of the trail. The Spirit is ‘Blowing like it’s gonna sweep my world away’, when the poet dies, his world will suddenly come to an end, the present world is swept away and the poet is now going to enter an entirely new world.
When the poet says: ‘I’m gonna stop at Carbondale’, this may refer to a story told by an old record store owner who used to live in Carbondale. This record store owner is said to have said that the train which was struck by lightning in 1921 (see the reference to the New York Times above) would have gone through Carbondale, and that train would have brought many great blues and jazz musicians up from the south, who were on their way to Chicago. The train accident and the delay it apparently caused may be the reason why so many great musicians played in Carbondale.
Since the poet is a musician he’s gonna stop at Carbondale, but when at the same time he says ‘ keep on going, that Duquesne train gonna ride me night and day’, in some sort of a way he wants to make it clear that he is already on that train bound for glory, he is not going to leave that slow train which is picking up speed now, he is already on the other side of the fence.
‘You say I’m a gambler, you say I’m a pimp
But I ain’t neither one
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Sound like it's on a final run’.
‘You say I’m a gambler, you say I’m a pimp, but I ain’t neither one’. A gambler is a person who wagers money on the outcome of games or sporting events or someone who risks loss or injury in the hope of gain or excitement. A pimp is someone who procures customers for whores or arranges sexual partners for others. When the poet refutes these accusations by saying that he is neither a gambler nor a pimp, he wants to make it clear that – no matter how evasive he has been at times in expressing how he exactly feels about ‘God and man and law’ - he is not a person who ‘gambles for support’, a person who runs with the hares and hunts with the hounds, who makes the best of both worlds, ‘all those who have eyes and have ears’ might know exactly how he feels. He is not a gambler or a pimp, always ready for a sellout of faith, ideas or convictions. On the contrary, when he urges his audience to ‘Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing, sounds like it's on a final run’, he feels that this time the whistle sounds as if it blows for the very last time. The train will leave and is on a final fun and will not come back; it is high time to get on board and although on other occasions he made it clear that even when you are in that train he ‘has a hard time believing if some people will ever arrive’, he is determined to get on board and to safely reach his destination and the whistle warns you’d better listen to that last whistle blowing before it’s too late.
‘Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like she never blowed before
Blue light blinking, red light glowing
Blowing like she's at my chamber door’.
When he goes on to say ‘Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing, blowing like she never blowed before’ he dwells on the same subject. This time he hears a different way of blowing, a way of blowing he never heard before, as if the whistle says: ‘I know your name, I know who you are,’ I’m gonna call you home to the place where you belong, to heaven’. ‘Blue light blinking’, in railway language a blue signal signifies that workmen are on, under, or between rolling equipment. The cover of the album ‘Slow Train Coming’ may give you a clue as to what this means. Although the train may be on the final run and the work is almost done, the railroad is at the same time still under construction. Time, on the other hand, is running out, because a ‘red light is glowing’, a red light means: STOP your way of living and think about it before it’s too late, all signals are on red, there is not much time left. This is intensified by the words: ‘Blowing like she's at my chamber door’. A chamber is a retired room, esp. an upper room used for sleeping. When the whistle is at his chamber’s door, it means that death will come soon and the poet is ready to meet God and may be called home any minute now.
‘You’re smiling through the fence at me
Just like you always smiled before
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like she ain't gon' blow no more’
The poet is just about to enter the place ‘that’s only one step down from here, it’s called the land of permanent bliss’. ‘You’re smiling through the fence at me just like you always smiled before’ may be God or Jesus welcoming him from the other side of the fence. In this smile there is heavenly peace, serenity and complacency as if God knows who he is and has always known him and that is why it says:’ just like you always smiled before’. Finally he is ready, just like he wrote in ‘Ain’t Talking’, to meet ‘All his loyal and much-loved companions, they approve of me and share my code’. ‘Blowing like she ain't gon' blow no more’ may mean that deep down inside he feels that this is the last time you can hear this whistle blow and he is just about to be called home.
‘Can't you hear that Duquesne whistle blowing?
Blowing like the sky's gonna blow apart
you’re the only thing alive that keeps me going
you’re like a time bomb in my heart’
This stanza takes us again to what will happen on the Latter Day. ‘Blowing like the sky's gonna blow apart’ makes you think of what Dylan wrote in ‘Things have changed’: ‘If the Bible is right the world will explode’. It reflects what is written in 2 Peter 3: 10: ‘But the day of the Lord will come like a thief, and then the heavens will pass away with a loud noise, and the elements will be dissolved with fire, and the earth and the works that are upon it will be burned up’. ‘You’re the only thing alive that keeps me going’ is basically the same thought as expressed in 'This dream of You' from the album ‘Together through Life’: ‘All I have and all I know is this dream of you which keeps me living on’. He knows that when the final whistle blows, Someone will be there to care for him. ‘You’re like a time bomb in my heart’ is a metaphor describing the fact that God has planted His seed in his heart. This time bomb in his heart waits for the final whistle to blow and will suddenly come to an explosion, a sudden change, in the twinkling of an eye. When this time bomb explodes at the set time – when the world explodes, it will be like Dylan wrote in the song: ‘Ye shall be changed’, ‘ye shall be changed, in a twinkling of an eye, when the last trumpet blows, the dead will arise and burst out of their clothes’
‘I can hear a sweet voice gently calling
Must be the mother of our LORD
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like my woman's on board’.
‘‘I can hear a sweet voice gently calling’ echoes ‘A Voice From On High’ which Bob used to sing with the Larry/Charlie band. "I hear a voice calling; it must be the Lord...."
The poet hears a voice gently or ‘steadily’ calling, welcoming him home and he feels and knows for sure that it cannot be anybody else but the mother of our LORD. The mother of our LORD Jesus is called Mary. The sweet voice of holy Virgin Mary, on behalf of Jesus, calls him home like he said in ‘Saving Grace’: ‘Wherever I’m welcome is where I’ll be’. This looks like a trait of Roman Catholicism. In the Roman Catholic tradition, Mary, the mother of our LORD Jesus acts like some sort of a mediatrix, a woman mediator between Jesus, God, and man. Although Dylan is not known to be associated to any church or denomination, we find this same Roman Catholic trait also in ‘Ain’t Talking’ from the album ‘Modern Times’ where it says: “They say prayer has the power to heal, so pray from the mother”. For a more details on this we refer to the analysis of 'Ain't Talking' - the Old Testament revisited' .
‘Blowing like my woman's on board’ seems to express that he has now come to terms with another feature in his works: his ambiguous attitude towards women. The woman, on the one hand the object of his desire and lust, distracting him from the road bound for glory, and on the other hand there is his quest for finding true love and partnership of a god fearing woman. Here on earth this tears him apart, but in eternity this ambiguity is straightened out ‘train, he knows that he will join her soon.
‘Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like it's gonna blow my blues away
You old rascal, I know exactly where you're going
I'll lead you there myself at the break of day’
As he hears the Duquesne whistle blowing, hope is glimmering through: ‘Blowing like it's gonna blow my blues away’, ‘the blues’ his sad melancholy mood is lifted like he expresses in ‘Highlands’’: ‘The sun is beginning to shine on me, but it’s not like the sun that used to be’. This time it is different, ‘the blues’, his sad, melancholy mood will not come back but will be blown away for good. ‘You old rascal, I know exactly where you're going’ seems inspired by an old song, at the intersection of Louis Armstrong and Bob Wills, the Hot Five with Earl Hines ( who was by the way born in Duquesne) and the Texas Playboys, where Louis Armstrong's ‘rascal’ is addressed directly: ‘I know exactly where you're going’. Dylan – as so often - gives the quote a different turn, and uses it for his own purposes in the song. ‘You old rascal’ looks like some sort of self-irony. It may be a sinner’s prayer, as if he is fully aware that his is still a sinner and that he is still in need of ‘saving grace’. It is as if he hears again ‘A Voice From On High’, it must be the voice of our Lord Jesus who addresses him directly: ‘You old rascal, I know exactly where you're going, I'll lead you there myself at the break of day’.The words ‘ I'll lead you there myself at the break of day’ are literally taken from Robert Fagles’ translation of Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’ – page 137. It is as if Jesus says: ‘I know you are a sinner, I know that you’re an old rascal, but I paid in blood for you, this time my own blood, and that is why ‘I know exactly where you’re going’, you’re my property and I’ll lead you there at the break of day, you’ll be with me forever when the dawn is breaking and the night is disappearing, when the deal goes down’’.
‘I wake up every morning with that woman in my bed
Everybody telling me she's gone to my head
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like it's gonna kill me dead’.
After the heavenly reflections of the previous verse, it looks like he is suddenly thrown back to the harsh earthly monotonous reality of everyday life.’ ‘I wake up every morning with that woman in my bed, everybody telling me she's gone to my head’ sounds condescendingly and shows the ambiguous attitude towards women we outlined earlier in this article. The feeling comes close to what Dylan wrote in ‘Rolling and Tumbling’: ‘Well, I did all I know just to keep you off my mind, well, I paid and I paid and my suffering heart is always on the line. I'm flat-out spent, this woman she been driving me to tears’ and shows the wretchedness of his earthly existence which is full of tears and strain, a burden which often seems heavier than he can bear and which sometimes goes to his head. ‘Blowing like it's gonna kill me dead’ is reminiscent of a line in another song on the album ‘Tempest’: ‘Pay in Blood’ where Dylan writes: ‘the more I die, the more I live’. On the one hand he hears in this whistle the agony and the pain of his earthly existence, this feels like ‘it’s gonna kill me dead’, on the other hand, the pain and the agony is at the same time a learning process which will lead to life in abundance.
‘Can't you hear that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing through another no-good town
The lights of my native land are glowing
I wonder if they'll know me next time round’.
This verse connects the past, the present and the future. The running of the train in some sort of a way becomes timeless. In the wheels of time it runs through good and ‘no good towns’ whiles the whistle blows. ‘The lights of my native town are glowing’ are not only the lights of the land where he was born, his native town, the sweet memories of his native land but also the lights of his future land, in the same way as Dylan wrote elsewhere: ‘When what’s lost has been found, what’s to come has already been’. It is a reflection on his native land where he was born but also it looks forward to his actual native land, the future land, heaven, the Highlands, the place where he belongs. When he is still in the flesh, it is hard to believe that he will be welcomed in this land, it may be the reason why he says: ‘I wonder if they’ll know me next time round’. ‘Will they recognize me; accept me for who I am and where I am now that I’m standing on the platform, well dressed, waiting on the last train?’
‘I wonder if that old oak tree's still standing
That old oak tree, the one we used to climb
Listen to that Duquesne whistle blowing
Blowing like she's blowing right on time’.
These final words dwell on the same thought. Sweet memories of his youth, of his boyhood, are connected to the Promised Land in the future. This passage is reminiscent of an old song called: ‘The green green grass of home’:
‘The old home town looks the same as I step down from the train,
The old house is still standing, though the paint is cracked and dry,
and there's that old oak tree that I used to play on’.
All good things will not just be sweet memories of the past, over and done with in the land of oblivion, but everything in this earthly life which is of any value will be purified on the Latter Day and not destroyed and will come back in eternal life, unscathed and freed from tears and pain. There is a time for everything, the whistle is ‘blowing like she’s blowing right on time'.


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PostPosted: Sat December 21st, 2013, 08:09 GMT 

Joined: Fri August 26th, 2011, 12:52 GMT
Posts: 132
For all you fans of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, fans of Mr. Benmont Tench-and, well, everyone else too- y'all be on the lookout for this!!!:

You Should Be So Lucky:
Image
Benmont Tench's first solo record, You Should Be So Lucky will be released On February 18, 2014; and his record is gonna include his cover of DUQUESNE WHISTLE. Way cool!
http://www.bluenote.com/news/benmont-tench-to-release-solo-debut-album-you
8)
(on that Rolling Stone page, you can hear one of Benmont's new songs, "Blonde Girl, Blue Dress". Benmont's voice is sounding as sexy as Bob's voice, I say! Sounds like one real cool hep cat.)

By the way- check out the track listing for Benmont's album on Amazon, and you'll see that Duquesne Whistle is actually going to be final track on his record (that made me chuckle little bit, to think of how Duquesne Whistle was, of course, the opening track on Tempest, but then on Benmont's record it's gonna be the closing song...hehe)
http://www.amazon.com/You-Should-Be-So-Lucky/dp/B00H5D533O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1386876952&sr=8-1&keywords=Benmont+Tench&tag=smarturl-20

I remember reading some tweets from Benmont back around September 2012, where he said how much he dug Tempest. If I recall correctly, he said he loved the way it swung, and/or that Bob's band was 'really swingin'. Yes indeed! Way cool to see that Benmont has now covered Duquesne Whistle! Sweet. Can't wait to hear it! So Exciting! :D

*By the way: "Corrina, Corrina" is also going to be on Benmont's record!! SWEET! :P
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PostPosted: Sat December 21st, 2013, 18:17 GMT 

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It's one of the best things on Tempest, but I only really feel like listening to the first six tracks on that album now.


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PostPosted: Sat April 5th, 2014, 18:05 GMT 
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wow! The Duquesne Whistle from last night up on youtube (The one taken from far away has the best sound) is SO good! Love that harmony style Bob is singing, and the piano sound on it- And all of the Band sound- It just swings and jumps and jives!

(AND the pay in blood voice is Kid Dylan, in lots of ways,
and :lol: re the audience swoon when he turns toward the piano after the harmonica part in Tangled Up In Blue.)

All this was noticeable even though the video was so far away. But Then there are those closer shots from the other person's Youtube, with just clips of the songs... good grief Bob, there ought to be a law...


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PostPosted: Sat April 5th, 2014, 21:08 GMT 
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Good song! Strange video...not really one I could watch every day (the music video- not live, which was pretty cool!).


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PostPosted: Sat April 5th, 2014, 21:17 GMT 
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Sounds like Benmont Tench's album will swing! Can't wait to hear the other songs from Tokyo 4/4 and 4/5. I'm downloading the bit torrent now.


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PostPosted: Tue April 8th, 2014, 17:04 GMT 

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This analysis by Kees de Graaf is excellent but it misses a few things at the end. "My native land" does put the singer in mind of a new Jerusalem, but I think this speaker is a returning Christ. Hence the question "I wonder if they'll know me next time round." Not "Will people let me be myself?" is the question but "This time will they recognize me as King?" This time when I return, will they try to crucify me again?

That question is on the speaker's mind, because look at the closing lines:

I wonder if that old oak tree's still standing
That old oak tree, the one we used to climb --

But it's not kids having fun climbing up through the branches that this memory evokes; it's "the tree" that is a common Christian metaphor for the cross. Is there still a cross up in Jerusalem, the speaker asks. "We" used to climb, i.e. we used to be put up there for a hanging, and I take it the "we" brings us back to the hanging pair in "All Along the Watchtower," the joker and the thief. The thief hanging next to Jesus is the only person whom Jesus tells in all four Gospels that he'll be saved and go to paradise -- not the disciples, none of the fervent believers, none of the virtuous people he encounters. The thief is saved, and the singer in "Duquesne Whistle" is speaking to him again now, recalling the crosses they both hung from.


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PostPosted: Tue April 8th, 2014, 17:08 GMT 
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WHOAH. That was deep, Fleet Foot. My mind is blown. :!:


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PostPosted: Tue April 8th, 2014, 21:59 GMT 

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Fleet Foot wrote:
This analysis by Kees de Graaf is excellent but it misses a few things at the end. "My native land" does put the singer in mind of a new Jerusalem, but I think this speaker is a returning Christ. Hence the question "I wonder if they'll know me next time round." Not "Will people let me be myself?" is the question but "This time will they recognize me as King?" This time when I return, will they try to crucify me again?

That question is on the speaker's mind, because look at the closing lines:

I wonder if that old oak tree's still standing
That old oak tree, the one we used to climb --

But it's not kids having fun climbing up through the branches that this memory evokes; it's "the tree" that is a common Christian metaphor for the cross. Is there still a cross up in Jerusalem, the speaker asks. "We" used to climb, i.e. we used to be put up there for a hanging, and I take it the "we" brings us back to the hanging pair in "All Along the Watchtower," the joker and the thief. The thief hanging next to Jesus is the only person whom Jesus tells in all four Gospels that he'll be saved and go to paradise -- not the disciples, none of the fervent believers, none of the virtuous people he encounters. The thief is saved, and the singer in "Duquesne Whistle" is speaking to him again now, recalling the crosses they both hung from.


Right on the money! Another exemplar from Tempest of a Christ narrative. Dylan may have been on a wind up when he declared this album the replacement for the Gospel one he failed to make.


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PostPosted: Tue April 8th, 2014, 23:49 GMT 
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More and more, I'm convinced Tempest is the "religious album" he intended to make. I think his saying he was going to make "a religious album" but instead released Tempest is a classic case of Dylanesque misdirection. 8)

"I think he always made exactly the music he wanted to make at the exact time he wanted to make it," or however Bob Neuwirth said it exactly in No Direction Home.


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PostPosted: Wed April 9th, 2014, 08:36 GMT 

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"I can hear a sweet voice gently calling
Must be the mother of our Lord":

His Christianity now isn't quite the same as it was in 1979. :)


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PostPosted: Wed April 9th, 2014, 10:23 GMT 

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I completely agree with both of you.


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PostPosted: Wed April 9th, 2014, 16:55 GMT 

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This is one song that doesn't come over great live (for me). The album track is stellar.. So often it's the opposite for me?? MEZ


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PostPosted: Fri May 23rd, 2014, 01:37 GMT 
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I'm very, very fond of this song. I'd even say its one of the best on Tempest. It puts me in a place.


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PostPosted: Fri May 23rd, 2014, 03:00 GMT 
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TangledUpInBlack wrote:
I'm very, very fond of this song. I'd even say its one of the best on Tempest. It puts me in a place.



I feel exactly the same way. It's a happy up-beat song. Here is a related but rather sad tidbit from the wiki page of Duquesne, Pennsylvania. I imagine the Bob Dylan reference is probably false but I really don't know.



Quote:
The borough of Duquesne was settled in 1789[2] and incorporated in 1891.

Duquesne Works, a productive steel mill that was part of Carnegie Steel Corporation and later part of U.S. Steel, was the heart and soul of Duquesne during its brightest moments in the early 20th century. Duquesne was home to the largest blast furnace in the world, named the "Dorothy Six".[3] Bob Dylan´s song Duquesne Whistle (Tempest, 2012) is dedicated to it.

The city's population peaked in 1930, then declined with deindustrialization beginning in the 1960s. Today a stark post-industrial landscape, Duquesne has fewer total residents (5,565 at the 2010 U.S. census) than were the city's mill workers in 1948.[4] According to the McKeesport Daily News, Duquesne has the worst performing schools in the state of Pennsylvania. Duquesne was designated a financially distressed municipality in 1991 by the state.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duquesne,_Pennsylvania


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PostPosted: Sat June 21st, 2014, 14:39 GMT 
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I recently heard this by Lou Monte and couldn't help but think of Duquesne Whistle.

Darktown Strutter's Ball
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWAS9FYqMQ4


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