Expecting Rain

Go to main page
It is currently Fri November 24th, 2017, 17:00 GMT

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 95 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu October 26th, 2017, 20:30 GMT 

Joined: Fri January 5th, 2007, 23:38 GMT
Posts: 1898
Location: Ireland
chrome horse wrote:
HopE wrote:
He wasn't passin' the hat for donations then, like most of the preachers we see - "Jesus saves, so get out your checkbook for Jesus!".

I was mimicking what preachers say at church - "gimme your money!"

Bob doesn't do that. You are confused. Money spent for a Bob Dylan concert is an investment in historical magic - and money well spent.


Dylan knowingly risked his career for this material and did untold damage to it, but he didn't compromise one jot.

I'd give this stuff a chance, even if just the two-cd version.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu October 26th, 2017, 22:38 GMT 

Joined: Thu October 26th, 2017, 12:22 GMT
Posts: 3
Loved the period from the moment I discovered it. Gospel is a very American and traditional form of music and Bob brought all his passion and belief to the work and produced some time tested magic. Saved is poorly produced but in it he has a ferocious band behind him really rocking out. Slow Train Coming is just a great gospel album (Wexler and Knopfler helped this album immensely). Shot of Love is sort of a mixed bag but still very Dylan. Love this period. Dylan wouldn't be Dylan without it imho.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 01:45 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Fri June 29th, 2012, 14:26 GMT
Posts: 643
Had I been a Dylan fan in 79 I'd have struggled to defend his new direction detesting, as I do, this particular brand of right wing fundamentalist Christianity. Hearing Mid(life crisis)Bob surrender his individualism and humour to some numbing reactionary 'higher power' would have seemed like betrayal of epic if not biblical proportions. The dodgy tarot mysticism of Desire era was bad enough but this?

Thirty eight years on it just seems like another chapter in an unparalleled long career with the attendant highlights and relative lowlights. Unlike many here I see Dylan as the antithesis of a sincere "authentic" Pete Seger type artist. Basically it's all artifice. He tries out, fully inhabits, poses,positions,ideologies and in doing so, amazingly, shines new insight and light on them as no one else can. I just think that "the preacher" guise to a burnt out "rock and roll addict" Little Richard fan like Bob was irresistible. And he could shag the backing singers with a clear conscience because he was on a spiritual quest.

Love the commitment he poured into it. Hate the message of the first two albums. Despise the Grammy winning vocals on the first album. Despair at the patchiness of the near great third album.

But it's mostly clear focussed Dylan committing his talents to a three year project so despite all the above reservations it's still fascinating and often brilliant.

Took me two years to get - Saved was the last of the back catalogue I bought.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 02:06 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 27th, 2005, 01:09 GMT
Posts: 399
As much time as it took me to listen to the tracks


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 06:12 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue August 23rd, 2011, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 1477
Location: Singapore
Its a period much easier to appreciate when you know he came out of it.
I think I'd have struggled at the time, given my total disdain for religion.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 07:37 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sat April 3rd, 2010, 17:44 GMT
Posts: 1106
I never really got to grips with it. I liked the album Slow Train Coming, in fact I thought it was a breath of fresh air after Street Legal and Budokan. At that point I had only seen Bob Dylan in concert once (Blackbushe) but had everything he had released on vinyl.
As I say I really enjoyed Slow Train, when Saved was released I dutifully purchased it but really didn't enjoy it and to have a third religious album a year later was a real turn off for me. I tried to get into Shot of Love but never really got into it. When it was released on CD I bought it again and have attempted to play it all the way through many times but usually six tracks is way enough for me in one session.
So in answer to the question I'm afraid I never did fully appreciate Dylan's Gospel period. I know he had a good band and at least the songs were original but it's just not my thing. Still love Slow train though!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 07:43 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 9th, 2006, 09:01 GMT
Posts: 3059
Location: Manchester UK
I loved Slow Train Coming from the first time I heard it. Knopfler and the rest of the band are splendid, the sound is wonderful, and Dylan's singing is incredibly passionate.

Saved and Shot of Love didn't impress me as much.

And then I heard the bootlegs from the period and I was blown away - still am.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 07:55 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun July 17th, 2005, 18:56 GMT
Posts: 976
Location: Deep South
I went through a 'religious period' myself, in my teens. Lasted from when my sister died, when I guess I was reaching out for a means of understanding and assistance, at age 13, and ended when my dad died, when I was 17, by which time the hypocrisy inherent in many of the people I encountered was enough to make me realise that, while God and spirituality might be one thing, I certainly wanted nothing to do with this man-made thing religion and all its power plays, controlling agendas and lies....

Maybe this experience colours my attitude to this period of Dylan's career, I'm not sure (I wouldn't even become aware of Dylan until a couple of years later, and then certainly not of the chronology of his career or his religious period), but I've never had a problem with it.

I guess it's because, for me, I don't have to agree with every single word an artist utters to be able to identify with a song... I can identify that he's identified a subject that he's passionate about, and that's what I find inspiring. It's always exciting to observe someone doing something that they're passionate about, because you can see passionate manifested in a physical way; doesn't matter if it's musical performance, dance, carpentry, mime, painting, bricklaying... if someone does something with an artistry borne of passion, it's a deeply human thing, and as other humans we can't help but respond to that.

So do I agree with the right-wing fundamentalist views expressed in some of these songs? Of course not, but that's not important - I doubt if Dylan believed in them all, either - it's more about presenting them as a viewpoint, purely to be able to encounter and appraise them.

Dylan might not have been at a vocal peak at this time, after wearing his voice out in the Rolling Thunder era, but it's testament again to the fact that great singing is really 10% voice and 90% expression. If you have a great voice but have no idea how to communicate human experience or emotion, then my mind will wander after a few moments - this is the case with the Michael Buble's of the world.... if you're voice is ravaged and rough but drips with humanity, I'll never stop listening - see Dylan, Tom Waits, Billie Holiday (in her later years) and countless wonderful blues singers throughout the years.

This is why the Gospel years contain great singing... this is why the Great American Songbook standards albums (please, 'Sinatra albums' is such a lazy side-swipe at these records) contain much great singing. You do the best with what you've got at the time. In each of these periods - the Gospel period and the Standards period, Dylan has just done that... which is why these periods fascinate me.

Also, my interest in this era exists at least partly because I'm always more interested in how a particular era fits into an artist's career as a whole, even if it's not my favourite. I also don't understand the need to bash various periods... for me, Dylan is a fascinating musical character - that's clearly why we're all here - so I'm interested in what he does, and what he does next... some aspects might be more successful than others... I might not have chosen for him to do religious albums, or three cover albums of American Standards, but what the hell does it matter what I want? It's not my life he's living. He's living his life and expressing himself in the ways he knows how, and I find that fascinating. This is what makes me want to listen. I've never really understood the demarkation of 'I "like" this' or 'I "don't like" that'.... that's just personal taste, and is always going to vary from person to person. It's only once we get beyond personal taste that things get interesting.

* EDIT - also, 'When He Returns' from Slow Train Coming is one of the greatest performances I've ever heard anyone give, both technically and emotively... so there's that.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 08:30 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Fri June 29th, 2012, 14:26 GMT
Posts: 643
^ Fantastic post - Thankyou for taking the time to write it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 11:21 GMT 

Joined: Sun May 10th, 2009, 09:40 GMT
Posts: 732
I still hate it (If you mean Gospel Period) after all these years. Or better that I completely forgot the man. It needed No Direction Home and Modern Times until I found out that he might have cured, but this Triplicate mess makes me wonder if he really is.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 12:23 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 27th, 2005, 01:09 GMT
Posts: 399
Some of you guys make me laugh. Bob was singing "jesus met a woman at the well", "this train is bound for glory" and "jesus christ" when he was a young kid. He's always had the bedrock of gospel in there. It seems mighty strange to be listening to an artist who's faith is quite obviously well rooted and have a total disdain for belief yourself. "Slow train coming" is but a parallel to "hard rain". John Wesley Harding is rocks first biblical album, he's known to have had an open Bible in the house at the time. "Oh mercy" is littered with references to faith, redemption or forgiveness. It's not always as overt but it's there, even in "sad eyed lady", the muse quite obviously takes on a godliness. There other parts of blonde on blonde that pop out..."six white horses" on sweet marie. The title of "obviously five believers".. The double meaning of stoning on "rainy day women". In 2000 he was doing "pass me not o gentle saviour", "rock of ages" and "waiting for the light to shine". I think it's fantastic that this bootleg is coming out. The material out so far sounds amazing but "gospel period" is a phrase that I can't comprehend. Gospel, rockabilly, country blues and folk are the pillars the world he inhabitants since way back.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 12:45 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue April 4th, 2006, 16:17 GMT
Posts: 2269
Location: Glasgow, on the banks of the clyde
The Bard wrote:
Its a period much easier to appreciate when you know he came out of it.
I think I'd have struggled at the time, given my total disdain for religion.



Same feeling here.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 12:57 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue April 4th, 2006, 16:17 GMT
Posts: 2269
Location: Glasgow, on the banks of the clyde
1981, live version of man.gave names (on a musical retrospective i think) The cow in this song dosent just eat the grass "smokin up so much grasd until he was fill". Even religious bobs a riot.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 15:05 GMT 

Joined: Thu September 19th, 2013, 18:24 GMT
Posts: 208
Rimshottbob wrote:
...the Gospel years contain great singing... [...] the Great American Songbook standards albums (please, 'Sinatra albums' is such a lazy side-swipe at these records) contain much great singing. You do the best with what you've got at the time. In each of these periods - the Gospel period and the Standards period, Dylan has just done that... which is why these periods fascinate me.

Also, my interest in this era exists at least partly because I'm always more interested in how a particular era fits into an artist's career as a whole, even if it's not my favourite. I also don't understand the need to bash various periods... for me, Dylan is a fascinating musical character - that's clearly why we're all here - so I'm interested in what he does, and what he does next... some aspects might be more successful than others... I might not have chosen for him to do religious albums, or three cover albums of American Standards, but what the hell does it matter what I want? It's not my life he's living. He's living his life and expressing himself in the ways he knows how, and I find that fascinating. This is what makes me want to listen. I've never really understood the demarkation of 'I "like" this' or 'I "don't like" that'.... that's just personal taste, and is always going to vary from person to person. It's only once we get beyond personal taste that things get interesting.


I've been mulling over writing something very similar to this. While it did take me a long time to appreciate the Gospel records, that's mainly because I didn't try. I made assumptions about them. But then I went through a particularly Dylan-heavy period, and became suddenly interested in his musical biography (as opposed to personal gossip or details, except insofar as they make legible some of the musical decisions), in a way I never had been before. So now I find I'm simply interested in what he does. I don't like it all equally, but I'm also not interested in whether I think Saved or, later, Knocked Out Loaded are good or bad or not. No, I don't listen to them nearly as often as I do H61 or BOTT, but I can listen to them with interest.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 15:30 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 21st, 2010, 19:28 GMT
Posts: 169
escapeedrifter wrote:
The Bard wrote:
Its a period much easier to appreciate when you know he came out of it.
I think I'd have struggled at the time, given my total disdain for religion.


Same feeling here.


Me too. Totally unreligious non-believer. Had started reading (about the) bible from listening to Bob, but only to know more about things like approaching riders, Judas Iscariot etc. At first I was a bit sceptical (there was no ER, just short newspaper clips about an evangelical album being recorded etc.). Then when it came out I was in the record shop, heard the intro for Gotta Serve and all my sorrows were over. The music was top. And what did I care about who he was personally, that had never been an issue.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 15:49 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue April 4th, 2006, 16:17 GMT
Posts: 2269
Location: Glasgow, on the banks of the clyde
yolacrary wrote:
Rimshottbob wrote:
...the Gospel years contain great singing... [...] the Great American Songbook standards albums (please, 'Sinatra albums' is such a lazy side-swipe at these records) contain much great singing. You do the best with what you've got at the time. In each of these periods - the Gospel period and the Standards period, Dylan has just done that... which is why these periods fascinate me.

Also, my interest in this era exists at least partly because I'm always more interested in how a particular era fits into an artist's career as a whole, even if it's not my favourite. I also don't understand the need to bash various periods... for me, Dylan is a fascinating musical character - that's clearly why we're all here - so I'm interested in what he does, and what he does next... some aspects might be more successful than others... I might not have chosen for him to do religious albums, or three cover albums of American Standards, but what the hell does it matter what I want? It's not my life he's living. He's living his life and expressing himself in the ways he knows how, and I find that fascinating. This is what makes me want to listen. I've never really understood the demarkation of 'I "like" this' or 'I "don't like" that'.... that's just personal taste, and is always going to vary from person to person. It's only once we get beyond personal taste that things get interesting.


I've been mulling over writing something very similar to this. While it did take me a long time to appreciate the Gospel records, that's mainly because I didn't try. I made assumptions about them. But then I went through a particularly Dylan-heavy period, and became suddenly interested in his musical biography (as opposed to personal gossip or details, except insofar as they make legible some of the musical decisions), in a way I never had been before. So now I find I'm simply interested in what he does. I don't like it all equally, but I'm also not interested in whether I think Saved or, later, Knocked Out Loaded are good or bad or not. No, I don't listen to them nearly as often as I do H61 or BOTT, but I can listen to them with interest.


Great posts.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 17:22 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sat April 3rd, 2010, 17:44 GMT
Posts: 1106
Playing Slow Train Coming at this very moment, it's streets ahead of the other two albums imo!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 18:06 GMT 
Titanium Member

Joined: Sun February 28th, 2010, 20:24 GMT
Posts: 8214
Well, I'd already had been a big Bob Dylan fan long before STC came out.
I had grown up "in church" but was yet to become a believer myself.
That said, I loved STC the first time I heard it. It had a warmth, and
passion, all it's own.
I was deeply into the blues at the time. I loved black gospel music too.
I had an uncle, who took me to a black church, man, I loved the music there.
Musically, this was Bob expressing that same vibe. Theologically, I wasn't
there, yet.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 19:11 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun November 13th, 2016, 02:00 GMT
Posts: 264
kaleidosc0pe wrote:
I still don't appreciate it. and I really can't stand the female backvocals . (including Street Legal)

I bought Trouble No More anyway, for my collection and I am curious to watch the movie.


I want to see the movie.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 20:51 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Fri June 29th, 2012, 14:26 GMT
Posts: 643
Brian_Eire wrote:
Some of you guys make me laugh. Bob was singing "jesus met a woman at the well", "this train is bound for glory" and "jesus christ" when he was a young kid. He's always had the bedrock of gospel in there. It seems mighty strange to be listening to an artist who's faith is quite obviously well rooted and have a total disdain for belief yourself. "Slow train coming" is but a parallel to "hard rain". John Wesley Harding is rocks first biblical album, he's known to have had an open Bible in the house at the time. "Oh mercy" is littered with references to faith, redemption or forgiveness. It's not always as overt but it's there, even in "sad eyed lady", the muse quite obviously takes on a godliness. There other parts of blonde on blonde that pop out..."six white horses" on sweet marie. The title of "obviously five believers".. The double meaning of stoning on "rainy day women". In 2000 he was doing "pass me not o gentle saviour", "rock of ages" and "waiting for the light to shine". I think it's fantastic that this bootleg is coming out. The material out so far sounds amazing but "gospel period" is a phrase that I can't comprehend. Gospel, rockabilly, country blues and folk are the pillars the world he inhabitants since way back.


Just no.

Dylan had indeed always covered songs of faith and been influenced by both gospel music and the lexicon and literary legacy of the Bible. But he had never, professionally, shown any evidence of personal religious belief.

On the contrary, his most famous work (everything up to Self Portrait) is no less than a manifesto for a hip secular individualism. It delights in challenging orthodoxy, mocking institutions, power elites and unthinking Mr Jones's. The message is simple, both serious and irreverent - Don't follow leaders and watch your parking meters!

Dylan's place in popular culture is, and always will be the "thinking mans" pop star. The one with a Nobel prize. He's lauded as the person who brought intellectual sophistication and moral authority to a genre seen previously as bubblegum. The early breakthrough songs carry such weight they are almost hymns but they are secular hymns.

So just no ...this guy getting religion and talking about rock and rolling down to the pit and surrendering his own highly individualistic views to those of the Vineyard fukcing Fellowship and banging on about gays and preaching fire and brimstone and saying anyone with a different view would burn and buying it hook line and sinker was not the same as singing This Train in Bound for Glory with his mates.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 21:19 GMT 

Joined: Fri January 5th, 2007, 23:38 GMT
Posts: 1898
Location: Ireland
man in the moon wrote:
Brian_Eire wrote:
Some of you guys make me laugh. Bob was singing "jesus met a woman at the well", "this train is bound for glory" and "jesus christ" when he was a young kid. He's always had the bedrock of gospel in there. It seems mighty strange to be listening to an artist who's faith is quite obviously well rooted and have a total disdain for belief yourself. "Slow train coming" is but a parallel to "hard rain". John Wesley Harding is rocks first biblical album, he's known to have had an open Bible in the house at the time. "Oh mercy" is littered with references to faith, redemption or forgiveness. It's not always as overt but it's there, even in "sad eyed lady", the muse quite obviously takes on a godliness. There other parts of blonde on blonde that pop out..."six white horses" on sweet marie. The title of "obviously five believers".. The double meaning of stoning on "rainy day women". In 2000 he was doing "pass me not o gentle saviour", "rock of ages" and "waiting for the light to shine". I think it's fantastic that this bootleg is coming out. The material out so far sounds amazing but "gospel period" is a phrase that I can't comprehend. Gospel, rockabilly, country blues and folk are the pillars the world he inhabitants since way back.


Just no.

Dylan had indeed always covered songs of faith and been influenced by both gospel music and the lexicon and literary legacy of the Bible. But he had never, professionally, shown any evidence of personal religious belief.

On the contrary, his most famous work (everything up to Self Portrait) is no less than a manifesto for a hip secular individualism. It delights in challenging orthodoxy, mocking institutions, power elites and unthinking Mr Jones's. The message is simple, both serious and irreverent - Don't follow leaders and watch your parking meters!

Dylan's place in popular culture is, and always will be the "thinking mans" pop star. The one with a Nobel prize. He's lauded as the person who brought intellectual sophistication and moral authority to a genre seen previously as bubblegum. The early breakthrough songs carry such weight they are almost hymns but they are secular hymns.

So just no ...this guy getting religion and talking about rock and rolling down to the pit and surrendering his own highly individualistic views to those of the Vineyard fukcing Fellowship and banging on about gays and preaching fire and brimstone and saying anyone with a different view would burn and buying it hook line and sinker was not the same as singing This Train in Bound for Glory with his mates.


I'm with Brian on this.

Thinking and intellectual 'sophistication' (whatever that amounts to) are not incompatible with religious faith. Neither is being 'hip', which anyway is ultimately merely an inconsequential fad.

My take is that Dylan was a believing Jew in his early career. His early songs carried mainly themes of justice, but there were some that touched on metaphysical themes such as Chimes of Freedom and Gates of Eden. He did seem to refer to Christ quite frequently in his earlier work, but really first showed substantial interest with Sign On The Cross. Many of the other Basement songs featured religious themes to varying degrees.

When Dylan finally took his leap, I'd be confident he had put plenty of deep thinking into it. For him personally it had to have been very difficult. His family seem to have been mostly practicing Jews and many of his friends, acquaintances and business associates were Jewish. Becoming a Christian would have put great strain on these relationships. But for his background, I think he would have made the move earlier. There had been hints throughout the seventies, but the decision wasn't unthought out.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 21:39 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Fri April 1st, 2011, 19:41 GMT
Posts: 449
Tragos114 wrote:
Although technically these are rock songs, pulling off a stunt like that was far from conventional. If anything, he was being radical as ever during the gospel years. Which is why he was practically forced to add some classic songs to the setlists in 1981.


edit: Just to clarify, i'm not mad about that period either and ideologically i couldn't feel more distant to what he was doing. I just think it's unfair to call it conventional.


Thanks Tragos. I don't want to demean what Bob was doing and sorry if I was unfair. I was deep into Dylan when the Christian conversion happened. And it did feel 'conventional' after his magnificent earlier work. The fundamentalist Christian propaganda and strict adherence to musical genre felt like a letdown. There was a horrible sense of Bob trying too hard. Being Dylan of course, he gradually recovered his own landscape :-)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri October 27th, 2017, 23:49 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Tue August 23rd, 2011, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 1477
Location: Singapore
man in the moon wrote:

Just no.

Dylan had indeed always covered songs of faith and been influenced by both gospel music and the lexicon and literary legacy of the Bible. But he had never, professionally, shown any evidence of personal religious belief.

On the contrary, his most famous work (everything up to Self Portrait) is no less than a manifesto for a hip secular individualism. It delights in challenging orthodoxy, mocking institutions, power elites and unthinking Mr Jones's. The message is simple, both serious and irreverent - Don't follow leaders and watch your parking meters!

Dylan's place in popular culture is, and always will be the "thinking mans" pop star. The one with a Nobel prize. He's lauded as the person who brought intellectual sophistication and moral authority to a genre seen previously as bubblegum. The early breakthrough songs carry such weight they are almost hymns but they are secular hymns.

So just no ...this guy getting religion and talking about rock and rolling down to the pit and surrendering his own highly individualistic views to those of the Vineyard fukcing Fellowship and banging on about gays and preaching fire and brimstone and saying anyone with a different view would burn and buying it hook line and sinker was not the same as singing This Train in Bound for Glory with his mates.


Thank you for taking the time to write what I was thinking.
And I still love the "Gospel Period" music btw.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat October 28th, 2017, 00:39 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Fri June 29th, 2012, 14:26 GMT
Posts: 643
Mickvet wrote:

I'm with Brian on this.

Thinking and intellectual 'sophistication' (whatever that amounts to) are not incompatible with religious faith. Neither is being 'hip', which anyway is ultimately merely an inconsequential fad.

My take is that Dylan was a believing Jew in his early career. His early songs carried mainly themes of justice, but there were some that touched on metaphysical themes such as Chimes of Freedom and Gates of Eden. He did seem to refer to Christ quite frequently in his earlier work, but really first showed substantial interest with Sign On The Cross. Many of the other Basement songs featured religious themes to varying degrees.

When Dylan finally took his leap, I'd be confident he had put plenty of deep thinking into it. For him personally it had to have been very difficult. His family seem to have been mostly practicing Jews and many of his friends, acquaintances and business associates were Jewish. Becoming a Christian would have put great strain on these relationships. But for his background, I think he would have made the move earlier. There had been hints throughout the seventies, but the decision wasn't unthought out.


Agree that none of those things are incompatible and have no view or real knowledge of Bobs pre born again individual faith.

Just saying that Dylan is a hugely important 20th century figure. Like it or not the things he is commonly known for representing; "the cutting edge" "voice of a generation" with an unmatched influence on not just music but mainstream thought and popular culture have nothing to do with religion.

To then say it's mighty strange for non believers to like that artist is disingenuous. It's a false equivalency to compare works like John Wesley Hardin and Oh Mercy which use biblical imagery and allegory to express a highly personal truth to works like Slow Train Coming and Saved which evangelise prescripted dogma.

I'm not knocking it or putting it down, just saying that what he represents to most is very different to the views he expressed between 79 and 81.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat October 28th, 2017, 01:50 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu January 24th, 2008, 15:14 GMT
Posts: 17876
Location: Where the swift don't win the race
Loved it from the first time I heard it, something I can't say about anything previous except Before the Flood or At Budakon. I learned to like the other 70s stuff over time... But it did take time.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 95 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: TOOM


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group