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PostPosted: Sun October 22nd, 2017, 16:20 GMT 

Joined: Mon March 16th, 2009, 10:46 GMT
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Not sure how much this has been discussed, but it
surprises me when folks don't realize that Mozambique
is an implied 'message' song, with a satirical message
about the blindness that consumerism induces.

The insurgency war, which last 10 years, had just come
to an end before Desire came out, (the ceasefire was declared
some time in 1974). By some, the newfound stability was seen
as a green light to now re-visit Mozambique for its spectacular
natural beauty. Mozambique had enjoyed a huge tourism profile
in the 1950s and 1960s. As it turned out, the economic upturn
did not happen, but that was difficult to predict in 1975.

I liked that Dylan never felt he had to explain or defend the
finesse of the lyric or the song's intent. But occasionally I get
the idea that some still take the song at face value.


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PostPosted: Sun October 22nd, 2017, 16:26 GMT 
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People hardly even listen to the song, let alone bother trying to understand the words. I wouldn't worry about it.


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PostPosted: Sun October 22nd, 2017, 16:40 GMT 

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The satire and irony was more in evidence in the Hard Rain TV show version.


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PostPosted: Sun October 22nd, 2017, 17:32 GMT 
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Why should Bob write a satirical song about a country that just gained its independence after more than ten years of fighting for it? I don't get it.

It can be seen as kind of ironic maybe that the country was caught in a civil war (that lasted for 16 years) only a few months after Desire was released.


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PostPosted: Sun October 22nd, 2017, 18:55 GMT 
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The song is certainly a satire, but that's not the joke.

When Dylan and Levy were writing Desire, they had the TV on a lot. The Civil War in Mozambique was a regular news story at the time, and Dylan and Levy jokingly competed with each other to see how many rhymes with Mozambique they could come up with to pass the time.

That's how the song was written. It's not a comment on the politics of Mozambique. Bob had no in-depth knowledge of the situation. It's just an in-joke between Dylan and Levy they came up with to kill time.


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PostPosted: Sun October 22nd, 2017, 19:46 GMT 

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gibsona07 wrote:
The song is certainly a satire, but that's not the joke.

When Dylan and Levy were writing Desire, they had the TV on a lot. The Civil War in Mozambique was a regular news story at the time, and Dylan and Levy jokingly competed with each other to see how many rhymes with Mozambique they could come up with to pass the time.

That's how the song was written. It's not a comment on the politics of Mozambique. Bob had no in-depth knowledge of the situation. It's just an in-joke between Dylan and Levy they came up with to kill time.

And they managed admirably with a record breaking Cheek Speak & Peek :o


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PostPosted: Sun October 22nd, 2017, 19:55 GMT 

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WrittenInMySoul wrote:
Why should Bob write a satirical song about a country that just gained its independence after more than ten years of fighting for it? I don't get it.

It can be seen as kind of ironic maybe that the country was caught in a civil war (that lasted for 16 years) only a few months after Desire was released.

The satire concerns itself with Western attitudes about and towards Mozambique; how we think of places exclusively in terms of how they fit in with our expectations and interests, and how this skewed perspective causes us to miss the point entirely.


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PostPosted: Mon October 23rd, 2017, 00:26 GMT 
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gerardv wrote:
The satire concerns itself with Western attitudes about and towards Mozambique; how we think of places exclusively in terms of how they fit in with our expectations and interests, and how this skewed perspective causes us to miss the point entirely.

Or maybe they just wrote some rhymes.


I thought I read somewhere that this song was written with an entirely different country/title in mind, but it was changed at the 11th-hour to 'Mozambique'. Anyone remember this?

I quite like this song, incidentally.


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PostPosted: Mon October 23rd, 2017, 01:26 GMT 
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panther wrote:
I thought I read somewhere that this song was written with an entirely different country/title in mind, but it was changed at the 11th-hour to 'Mozambique'. Anyone remember this?

ER’s Geranium Kiss offered this reference to Bauldie’s book, ‘Wanted Man’ in the track talks thread for Mozambique. That may be where you read it?

geranium_kiss wrote:
The Oppenheim excerpts were published by John Bauldie in an article he wrote. This is the bit about the Marseilles song:

"We lived an adventurous life, without complications. We screwed women. We drank. We ate. Nothing else. At first, Dylan was really surprised at it all, but soon it seemed he liked it. The whole came to mean something to him, especially Marseilles. He even wanted to write a song about the place. I told him not to. Structurally, it couldn't work. As we often slept in the same bed because he was afraid to sleep alone, I could hear him trying to find a rhyme for "Marseilles". I told him to think of something else."

Dylan had arrived at the house of painter David Oppenheim, whose work was used on the back cover of Blood On The Tracks, in early May, 1975, "completely despairing, isolated, lost, confused . . . he was having problems with his wife. She was supposed to have come with him but she hadn't arrived. He phoned her every day." He spent six weeks with Oppenheim, and then he went home, as alone as he'd been the night he arrived, but somehow different, changed, renewed.


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PostPosted: Mon October 23rd, 2017, 03:40 GMT 

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McG wrote:
People hardly even listen to the song, let alone bother trying to understand the words. I wouldn't worry about it.


Amen.


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PostPosted: Mon October 23rd, 2017, 08:43 GMT 
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gerardv wrote:
I liked that Dylan never felt he had to explain or defend the
finesse of the lyric or the song's intent. But occasionally I get
the idea that some still take the song at face value.



If dylan dosent explain the song thats enough for me, theres nothing wrong with taking his songs at face value.


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PostPosted: Mon October 23rd, 2017, 09:05 GMT 
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escapeedrifter wrote:
gerardv wrote:
I liked that Dylan never felt he had to explain or defend the
finesse of the lyric or the song's intent. But occasionally I get
the idea that some still take the song at face value.



If dylan dosent explain the song thats enough for me, theres nothing wrong with taking his songs at face value.


How do you play a song on a tambourine?


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PostPosted: Mon October 23rd, 2017, 09:14 GMT 
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It wouldnt hold my weight. ??


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PostPosted: Mon October 23rd, 2017, 15:56 GMT 
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I admit it. The first hundred times I heard the song I knew nothing about Mozambique. Just figured it was some exotic vacation spot. I was 14-15. I learned that the lyrics were a bit of a ruse from a magazine review of Desire a year or two later .


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 08:09 GMT 

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kinda reminds one of TALKN BEAR MOUNTAIN PICNIC MASSACRE BLUES


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 08:33 GMT 

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I hate this song with a passion. One of the very few Dylan tracks that I always skip.


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 09:02 GMT 
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Wow


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 09:52 GMT 
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I admit I never saw any irony in the lyrics, but even if lyrics were done by Yeats, Byron and Thomas working together at the peak of their genius it wouldnt make me enjoy such a musically dull tune as this


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 09:57 GMT 
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wormington wrote:
I admit I never saw any irony in the lyrics, but even if lyrics were done by Yeats, Byron and Thomas working together at the peak of their genius it wouldnt make me enjoy such a musically dull tune as this

And then there's me -- I think it's one of the best melodies he's written.


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 11:25 GMT 

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TBH, I'm not a fan of Desire at all. Dunno if it's the way Bob sings, the lyrics, or the band arrangements, but I just find there's something mannered and irritating about the whole thing. The only saving grace for me is Black Diamond Bay (the only Desire track that would make my personal Best of Dylan). Broken down, my reactions are something like:

Love: Black Diamond Bay
Quite like: Hurricane, Romance In Durango
Can tolerate: Joey, Isis
Dislike: One More Cup Of Coffee, O Sister
Detest: Mozambique, Sara


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 12:03 GMT 

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O boy the daggers for Desire are coming out. I always thought of Street Legal as a 'love or hate' album, but not Desire.


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 13:38 GMT 
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mjmooney wrote:
TBH, I'm not a fan of Desire at all. Dunno if it's the way Bob sings, the lyrics, or the band arrangements, but I just find there's something mannered and irritating about the whole thing. The only saving grace for me is Black Diamond Bay (the only Desire track that would make my personal Best of Dylan). Broken down, my reactions are something like:

Love: Black Diamond Bay
Quite like: Hurricane, Romance In Durango
Can tolerate: Joey, Isis
Dislike: One More Cup Of Coffee, O Sister
Detest: Mozambique, Sara


:shock:


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 14:44 GMT 

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mjmooney wrote:
TBH, I'm not a fan of Desire at all. Dunno if it's the way Bob sings, the lyrics, or the band arrangements, but I just find there's something mannered and irritating about the whole thing. The only saving grace for me is Black Diamond Bay (the only Desire track that would make my personal Best of Dylan). Broken down, my reactions are something like:

Love: Black Diamond Bay
Quite like: Hurricane, Romance In Durango
Can tolerate: Joey, Isis
Dislike: One More Cup Of Coffee, O Sister
Detest: Mozambique, Sara


Yes, Desire is completely overrated


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 14:47 GMT 
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Mozambique isn't much of a song, but let's not go overboard and discount Desire as a whole.


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PostPosted: Tue October 24th, 2017, 15:49 GMT 
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panther wrote:
wormington wrote:
I admit I never saw any irony in the lyrics, but even if lyrics were done by Yeats, Byron and Thomas working together at the peak of their genius it wouldnt make me enjoy such a musically dull tune as this

And then there's me -- I think it's one of the best melodies he's written.

:shock: Did Dylan write 2 different songs called Mozambique?

mjmooney wrote:
TBH, I'm not a fan of Desire at all. Dunno if it's the way Bob sings, the lyrics, or the band arrangements, but I just find there's something mannered and irritating about the whole thing. The only saving grace for me is Black Diamond Bay (the only Desire track that would make my personal Best of Dylan). Broken down, my reactions are something like:

Love: Black Diamond Bay
Quite like: Hurricane, Romance In Durango
Can tolerate: Joey, Isis
Dislike: One More Cup Of Coffee, O Sister
Detest: Mozambique, Sara

As for myself
Love: Isis, Hurricane, O Sister, One more cuppa coffee, Joey (shut up, I like it)
Like: Black diamond bay
Can tolerate: Romance in Durango, Sara (but I have a problem listening to it. It´s too sad, too intense, too desperate, need to be in the mood)
Dislike: Mozambique


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