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PostPosted: Sun October 15th, 2017, 16:38 GMT 

Joined: Sat February 5th, 2005, 18:05 GMT
Posts: 442
I know October 1967 is always listed as the month the acetate first came to be, but I'm just curious if anyone's been able to pinpoint a day where it was either cut, submitted for copyright or officially copyrighted, or just distributed for publishing purposes?


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PostPosted: Mon October 16th, 2017, 04:56 GMT 
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Joined: Mon September 23rd, 2013, 20:25 GMT
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If I may piggyback on your thread :oops: ... I always wondered when the first (more or less) complete bootleg of the Basement Tapes was released.
Great White Wonder came out in 1969 with 24 songs from the Basement Tapes, the official 1975 album has 16 songs with Dylan, whereas A Tree With Roots has more than 100 tracks. So when did the floodgates open?


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PostPosted: Mon October 16th, 2017, 16:58 GMT 

Joined: Mon November 1st, 2004, 16:01 GMT
Posts: 469
my precious time wrote:
If I may piggyback on your thread :oops: ... I always wondered when the first (more or less) complete bootleg of the Basement Tapes was released.
Great White Wonder came out in 1969 with 24 songs from the Basement Tapes, the official 1975 album has 16 songs with Dylan, whereas A Tree With Roots has more than 100 tracks. So when did the floodgates open?


Great White Wonder had exactly seven songs from The Basement Tapes. The rest was very early recordings of folk songs and a couple of outtakes from BIABH and Highway 61, and one song from the Johnny Cash Show appearance.


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PostPosted: Thu October 26th, 2017, 15:37 GMT 

Joined: Sat February 5th, 2005, 18:05 GMT
Posts: 442
I just became aware of Tim Dunn's book "The Bob Dylan Copyright Files 1962-2007." I don't have the actual book, but from the excerpts viewable on Google Books, it looks like we have actual copyright date(s) for those songs.

Apparently the first 10 song demo copyrighted from these sessions was given by the U.S. Copyright Office a date of copyright of October 9, 1967.

And it looks like the next five songs copyrighted from these sessions were given a date of copyright of January 16, 1968. (The John Wesley Harding songs were also given a date of copyright one day earlier on January 15, 1968.)

I'm guessing acetates rather than sheet music were submitted, given their prior practice, but regardless of when they were actually assembled and submitted, there's at least an official date that can be used to pin things down.


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PostPosted: Thu October 26th, 2017, 16:18 GMT 

Joined: Mon November 1st, 2004, 16:01 GMT
Posts: 469
belfast wrote:
I just became aware of Tim Dunn's book "The Bob Dylan Copyright Files 1962-2007." I don't have the actual book, but from the excerpts viewable on Google Books, it looks like we have actual copyright date(s) for those songs.

Apparently the first 10 song demo copyrighted from these sessions was given by the U.S. Copyright Office a date of copyright of October 9, 1967.

And it looks like the next five songs copyrighted from these sessions were given a date of copyright of January 16, 1968. (The John Wesley Harding songs were also given a date of copyright one day earlier on January 15, 1968.)

I'm guessing acetates rather than sheet music were submitted, given their prior practice, but regardless of when they were actually assembled and submitted, there's at least an official date that can be used to pin things down.


Back then it would've been sheet music. The Library of Congress copyright office didn't accept tapes or records for copyrighting songs until sometime in the mid-'80s.


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PostPosted: Thu October 26th, 2017, 18:25 GMT 

Joined: Sat February 5th, 2005, 18:05 GMT
Posts: 442
Gotcha. So would the publishing company have a transcriber who would simply transcribe Dylan's recordings into sheet music? (I'm guessing this must have been common practice considering how many name rock composers were unable to read, much less write, music properly. I think Lennon and McCartney never learned to do this.)

It's interesting to see the dates because I imagine they wouldn't send the songs to anyone until they were properly copyrighted. But then a few major songs on the Band's Music from Big Pink are among those last five copyrighted in January, and it's telling that the cover art painted by Dylan was the next creative work copyrighted after those songs. So perhaps the making of that album spurred things along? It's like the Band thought "hey why don't we record this and this song from those basement sessions last summer?" and then Dylan's camp had to move into action after noticing they weren't copyrighted just yet.


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PostPosted: Thu October 26th, 2017, 19:00 GMT 

Joined: Thu May 7th, 2009, 00:23 GMT
Posts: 246
can't pinpoint dates....i know i got GREAT WHITE WONDER, double vinyl lp, unmarked, white covers, shortly after NASHVILLE SKYLINE was release...only a handful of basement tapes songs...including THIS WHEELS ON FIRE, TOO MUCH OF NOTHING, NOTHING WAS DELIVERED, OPEN THE DOOR RICHARD... a live version of THE MIGHTY QUINN, from Isle of Wight...
about a year or so later, TROUBLE TROUBADOUR, became available, with many more, unknown at the time, basement tape gems...was a Dylans fan paradise.....bootleg music at the time was hard to discover...got the majority of mine via mail order, back of RollingStone mag had some ads...always well worth it


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