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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 14:37 GMT 
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Anr Bjotk wrote:
What does bobdylan.com charge in postage for the deluxe edition?

to Ireland it is €28.00 EUR


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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 14:41 GMT 
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Excerpt from
http://lostlivedead.blogspot.com/2016/1 ... r.html?m=1

The Fox Warfield and The Warfield Theater, 982 Market Street, San Francisco, CA (Jerry's House)

For fans and scholars of Jerry Garcia and the Grateful Dead, the Warfield Theater in San Francisco has to loom large. The 2300-capacity theater, built in 1922 at 982 Market Street, was first brought to Deadhead attention when the band played an historic 15-date engagement in September and October of 1980. About a decade later, when the Dead had finally outgrown the little theater, it became the home base of the Jerry Garcia Band. In the end, there were a couple of dozen Dead shows, and Garcia played there around 100 times himself, apart from the Dead. Throughout the entire period and right up through today, The Warfield has been a premier music venue in San Francisco, and the list of performers who have played there is like a rock history tutorial. Yet the Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia were fundamental in establishing The Warfield as a rock Signpost in San Francisco.

The Warfield was a premier rock concert venue in San Francisco from late 1979 onwards. It was a beautiful old theater, with wonderful acoustics, and over time more and more rock fans were willing to pay premium prices at the Warfield instead of a lesser price at a giant arena. You could probably write a book about the rock history of the Warfield, and it would be a good overview of late 20th century rock music. Merely from the perspective of the Grateful Dead, after Jerry Garcia moved forward in 1995, the Warfield became the home base of Phil Lesh And Friends, and there were numerous intimate, fantastic performances for those ensembles as well, making the Warfield a Deadhead nexus for 25 years.

In many ways, the Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia were instrumental in making the Warfield a viable venue at the end of the century. In that respect, it was a modern replay of an old 60s story, where the Dead were among the first to try out new venues. The Warfield story is different because the Dead were already established when they first played the Warfield, but it is no less interesting for that. This post will look at the history of Jerry Garcia and the Grateful Dead at the Warfield Theater.

Loew's Warfield

The Warfield was one of the great Market Street movie palaces in San Francisco. It first opened on May 13, 1922. The theater was built by Vaudeville promoter Marcus Loew (1866-1938), and the theater was named after David Warfield, one of his best friends, and an original investor in what would become the MGM-Loews empire (of course, for the complete story, as always, you have to go to JerryGarciasBrokendownPalaces). The Loew's Warfield originally presented Vaudeville along with movies and theatrical productions. There may also have been a speakeasy associated with the theater in the 1930s. When Vaudeville died out, the Warfield mostly showed movies, but live performances returned in the 1940s.

Since there were live performances at the Warfield in the 1940s, they must have hired plenty of musicians. It is at least plausible that saxophonist Jose Garcia, Jerry's father, may have performed at the Warfield. He gave up music after his kids were born--exactly when isn't clear--but he could still have played the Warfield before he gave it up. Nonetheless, at the very least Jose Garcia would have known that the Warfield was one of the principal entertainment venues in San Francisco, and in some alternate Philip K. Dick universe it would have made him proud to know that his son ended up the king of the venue.

The Warfield, under various names, continued as a movie palace. By the 1960s, the theater was known as the Fox-Warfield, a name it would keep for some time. The theater went through various owners, and the theater chain National General refurbished the theater in 1969. The theater re-opened in 1970 with a guest appearance by Mae West, promoting her film Sextette. Throughout the 70s, the theater mostly showed second-run fare. National General seems to have sold the Warfield to Mann Theaters, and by the end of the 70s it was owned by one Mike Thomas, who ultimately sold it to Bill Graham. In 1979, the theater was still known as the Fox-Warfield, and that was what was on the marquee, even though I think there was no longer any connection to a Fox Pictures entity. If you bought a ticket at BASS (a Ticketmaster forerunner), it said "Warfield Theater," but informally the place was called the Fox-Warfield or The Warfield, If you lived in San Francisco or had been to the theater, you called it "Fox-Warfield" to casually indicate that you knew what was on the marquee (a very San Francisco thing).

Warfield Theater Rock and Roll Highlights 1979-95

November 1-16, 1979: Bob Dylan (14 shows)

The first rock shows at the Fox-Warfield were very dramatic: 14 concerts by Bob Dylan over a period of 16 days. Dylan was still a legendary figure in rock at the time, and although he had toured somewhat during the 1970s, he was not the perpetual road dog that he would become a decade later. When Dylan played live, he either played in huge arenas or made some sort of quasi-stealth appearance. The Fox-Warfield shows were a complete break not only for Bob Dylan, but for major rock acts in general. Here was a major headline act playing for two weeks at a small theater, when two nights at a basketball arena would have sold more tickets. The shows were a major event, and a major coup for Bill Graham, and they sold out instantly. Of course, no one knew what Dylan would play--he was Dylan, after all.

On August 20, 1979, Dylan had released his most controversial album, Slow Train Coming. All of the songs emphasized his new-found Christian faith, a startling development for a nice Jewish boy from Hibbing, Minnesota. On October 18, 1979, Dylan had performed three songs from the album on Saturday Night Live with his new band. Still, performing songs off your new album was what people did on SNL, and anyway, he was Dylan. His new band was small, but they were disciplined session pros (Fred Tackett-guitar, Bill Smith-keyboards, Tim Drummond-bass and Jim Keltner-drums) supported by three gospel-style backup singers.

Opinions varied about Slow Train Coming, although few Dylan followers were unreserved fans of it. However, what no one expected at the Fox-Warfield shows was that Dylan would do nothing but his new "Christian" songs, with nary an old tune to be found. Dylan's choice of material in concert was always a fraught subject, not least because he has so much great material, but the idea of him performing no old material whatsoever was not appealing. All of the songs were either from Slow Train Coming or new, unreleased material, much of which would turn up on Dylan's next album, Saved. No one was happy, except, apparently for Bob Dylan, who found himself once again in the center of a musical controversy.

Reviews were scathing. Even despite their being no Stubhub equivalent, people who had bought tickets for multiple nights could not dump their tickets fast enough. I saw one of the later shows, and while there were some enthusiastic fans, for the most part the crowd was grim and silent, with a lot of frustrated hostility directed towards Dylan. Bob, of course, fed off that hostility and played his new songs with great intensity. All in all, it was a very strange concert experience.

The one unequivocal winner in the strange equation was the Fox-Warfield. There were comfortable seats both upstairs and down, the sight lines were great from everywhere and the sound was tremendous. Although the Tenderloin neighborhood was unpleasantly seedy, the Fox-Warfield was accessible by both BART (at the Powell Street station) and numerous city buses. Bill Graham Presents immediately started booking shows at the Fox-Warfield, and it was an instantly popular venue. For acts on the rise, it was far better to see them headline a full show at the Warfield than second on the bill at the Oakland Coliseum. I saw The Clash at the Fox-Warfield, for example (March 2, 1980), on the London Calling tour, and it was an all-time show, even for an old hippie like me (for a complete list of Warfield bookings between 1979 and 1980 see the Appendix below).

March 25, 1980: Bay Area Music Awards ("Bammies")

Bay Area Music Magazine, or "BAM," was a free bi-weekly music publication in the Bay Area, which started in 1976. It played a huge role in publicizing Bay Area music, both for national bands from the region, like the Grateful Dead, and for more local acts. BAM also played a formative role in the career of many journalists, notably Blair Jackson and David Gans.

In 1978, Dennis Erokan, the publisher of BAM, decided to have a Grammy-like "Bay Area Music Awards," which was dubbed The Bammies, to publicize both the paper and the music. The "award" was a straight-up popularity contest, and the event was just a big party, but everyone had a good time. In 1980, one of the first years, the party was held at The Fox-Warfield. Although no members of the Dead performed (Garcia and others would play in later years), Garcia was definitely present in 1980. He probably won "best guitarist" that year, as he did most years.

The significance of this event was that Garcia had definitely been to the Fox-Warfield prior to the Dead's lengthy residency later in the year. I don't think it was that big a deal, but if Richard Loren had been running the idea by Garcia, he could have said "you know, the place where that awards show was held." Garcia would have at least had an idea of what he was agreeing to.

September 25-October 14, 1980: Grateful Dead (15 shows)

For any Deadheads who hadn't attended the Dylan shows at the Fox-Warfield, or hadn't even been aware of it, the Fox-Warfield Theater suddenly loomed large. Bill Graham Presents announced a 15-show run by the Grateful Dead, from September 25 through October 14 of 1980. The 15 shows were significant, too, since it was one more than Dylan, a fact pointed out in the local press.

For the previous few years, the Dead had only played larger, general admission venues, namely Winterland, the Oakland Auditorium and Oakland Coliseum Arena. Those Deadheads from elsewhere, who had moved to the Bay Area--and there were more and more of them--were generally used to seeing the Grateful Dead in larger arenas or small stadiums. The only time in the prior decade that the Dead had regularly played small theaters had been the Summer '76 tour where they re-introduced themselves to touring.  The Dead had played the 2200-seat Orpheum in San Francisco for six nights, but fifteen nights was another order of magnitude.
As if this wasn't enough, the idea of playing almost every night for three weeks made the idea of traveling to see the Dead in San Francisco very appealing. I don't know how many people actually got to do that, but the Fox-Warfield shows were definitely something that got Deadheads all over the country thinking about it.  Shortly afterwards, the 9 shows at Radio City Music Hall at the end of October were announced, and it was a Brave New World indeed for the Grateful Dead.

Tickets for the 15-night Fox-Warfield run were only available by mail order. We all requested everything we could afford. I no longer remember the parameters. I think we ended up with tickets for nine shows. It was a completely different experience to not only know I would be attending numerous nights, but to have an actual reserved seat. I realize now that there had been occasional shows around the country at smaller, reserved seat theaters (like at the Richmond Mosque on May 25, 1977), but those had seemed be one-off events.

I was fortunate enough to attend the first Dead show at the Fox-Warfield on September 25, 1980 and it was magical indeed. We had heard faint rumors that the Dead might play acoustic, but I had written that off as wishful thinking. Yet lo and behold--when we walked into the gleaming Fox-Warfield and got to our seats on the lower balcony, there was the now-familiar stools for Bob and Jerry, grand piano for Brent and limited drum kits for Bill and Mickey. It was really going to happen. Of course, my friend and I spent our time guessing what song would come first (I went for "Dark Hollow," my friend for "Uncle John's Band"), but it was a burst of undiluted magic when "Bird Song" lit up the theater.

The 15 Dead shows at the Fox-Warfield were indeed magical, even for veteran Bay Area fans who had seen numerous Dead shows. Each show was three full sets, starting shortly after 8:00pm and going until well after 1:00am. The sound was perfect, and the relaxed vibe of sitting in an assigned seat, pretty much a new experience for Bay Area fans, meant that we could really focus on the details of the music instead of hassling with knuckleheads. The Dead played an astonishing wide variety of electric and acoustic songs throughout the run, and special moments were too plentiful to even count. Even if the Dead and Garcia had never played the Fox-Warfield again, the 1980 run alone permanently inscribed the venue as a legendary stop in the Dead's touring history. The albums Reckoning and Dead Set made sure that the rest of Deadhead nation knew about the Warfield as well.

November 9-22, 1980: Bob Dylan (12 shows)

The Fox-Warfield had had numerous great shows throughout 1980, culminating with the Dead's long run (see the Appendix below). Bill Graham surprised everyone with Bob Dylan's return for a 12-show engagement, seemingly to "make up" for the Gospel Debacle of the year before. Tickets did not move quickly. Remarkably, there were ads on the leading rock station, KSAN-fm, with Bill Graham himself talking over a rehearsal tape of Bob Dylan and his band performing (as I recall) "Blowin' In The Wind'." Bill assured listeners that Bob had assured him that he was rehearsing his old material. The implicit pitch was that it wasn't going to be an "all-gospel" Dylan show, all in all a very strange pitch for a radio ad. Still, the shows did not sell out.

Come the first few Dylan shows, and the reviews were not positive. Dylan, using the same band, did indeed perform about five old numbers out of 17 or so songs (on the first show, they were "Like A Rolling Stone," 'Girl From The North Country," "Just Like A Woman," "Senor" and "Blowin' In The Wind") but the balance was all of his new "Christian" material. Even the older songs were oddly re-arranged, in typical Dylan fashion, and didn't evoke classic Bob. No one was really pleased. There wasn't a rush to buy the remaining tickets for the other Dylan shows at the Fox-Warfield.

November 16, 1980: Bob Dylan plus Jerry Garcia

Bill Graham had his own remedy for Dylan shows that weren't selling out: invent some drama. Graham used his clout to get musicians to make guest appearances at the shows. Carlos Santana made a guest appearance on November 13, followed by Mike Bloomfield on November 15. For the seventh concert, the surprise guest was Jerry Garcia, who played electric guitar on 12 of the 22 songs, including "Simple Twist Of Fate." Garcia and Dylan had met previiously, but this was the first time they had played together on stage.


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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 14:53 GMT 
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£115 from JPC is closer to the ballpark figure I'd be willing to pay, but ideally I'd like to go a little lower. It's still early days, so I'm reasonably confident I'll get a suitable deal before the release date.


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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 14:59 GMT 
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notdarkyet wrote:
Anr Bjotk wrote:
What does bobdylan.com charge in postage for the deluxe edition?

to Ireland it is €28.00 EUR


Jesus! (pun inteded) Just when I thought the BD price was a fair deal (the main record store in norway sells it for 195$... )


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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 15:04 GMT 
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Great article, Sphere!
Thanks for posting the text!


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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 17:14 GMT 
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I've never ordered from BD.com before... Do I have to change the US in the URL to UK or EU or does the site automatically detect location by address?


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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 17:28 GMT 
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Anr Bjotk wrote:
I've never ordered from BD.com before... Do I have to change the US in the URL to UK or EU or does the site automatically detect location by address?


I did it few days back, from the UK. They do it automatically.


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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 17:33 GMT 
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gerardv wrote:
Anr Bjotk wrote:
I've never ordered from BD.com before... Do I have to change the US in the URL to UK or EU or does the site automatically detect location by address?


I did it few days back, from the UK. They do it automatically.


Thanks. Think I'll treat myself and pre-order for once.


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PostPosted: Mon September 25th, 2017, 23:00 GMT 
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gibsona07 wrote:
£115 from JPC is closer to the ballpark figure I'd be willing to pay, but ideally I'd like to go a little lower. It's still early days, so I'm reasonably confident I'll get a suitable deal before the release date.


Wasn't amazon.fr the best deal last time?


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PostPosted: Tue September 26th, 2017, 15:11 GMT 
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Wait, do I have to press a button in order to get the bonus disc? I assumed it was included for anyone who pre-orderes. Funking hell.
Is it possible to stick in on after?... :?


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PostPosted: Tue September 26th, 2017, 15:27 GMT 

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Anr Bjotk wrote:
Wait, do I have to press a button in order to get the bonus disc? I assumed it was included for anyone who pre-orderes. Funking hell.
Is it possible to stick in on after?... :?


It's automatically part of the order. I had the same worries as yourself and emailed them. They replied promptly that San Diego was in my order.


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PostPosted: Tue September 26th, 2017, 15:33 GMT 
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Mickvet wrote:
Anr Bjotk wrote:
Wait, do I have to press a button in order to get the bonus disc? I assumed it was included for anyone who pre-orderes. Funking hell.
Is it possible to stick in on after?... :?


It's automatically part of the order. I had the same worries as yourself and emailed them. They replied promptly that San Diego was in my order.


Phew... :wink: Cheers. Tried scrolling though the posts, but what was the consensus? Does it ship ON November 3 or does it ship to deliver around 3rd?


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PostPosted: Tue September 26th, 2017, 16:19 GMT 
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Those of you distressed about the cover photo might find this of interest.

https://twitter.com/bobdylan/status/912696157725429765


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PostPosted: Tue September 26th, 2017, 16:26 GMT 
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Anr Bjotk wrote:

Phew... :wink: Cheers. Tried scrolling though the posts, but what was the consensus? Does it ship ON November 3 or does it ship to deliver around 3rd?


Yes that's what I'm wondering. I'm in London myself, but this would
apply to all of Europe. Does BobDylan.com deliver pretty well on time?
Any experiences with previous orders?


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PostPosted: Tue September 26th, 2017, 17:23 GMT 
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gerardv wrote:

Yes that's what I'm wondering. I'm in London myself, but this would
apply to all of Europe. Does BobDylan.com deliver pretty well on time?
Any experiences with previous orders?


Some deep digging on this ever-growing thread shows that user Berrie says:

Berrie wrote:
They try to deliver on the release date.


Seems like a trustworthy chap.


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 02:45 GMT 
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Somebody Naked wrote:
Those of you distressed about the cover photo might find this of interest.

https://twitter.com/bobdylan/status/912696157725429765


It's on his facebook account too. Okay, it's now making a little more sense.


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 06:55 GMT 

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As someone else mentioned it's probably from the 'finger pointing' Dylan would do during certain songs. I don't see it as him being on a cross, and I'm almost certain that's not what the designer would have wanted to imply either, as that would be crass in the extreme.


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 07:43 GMT 
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Anr Bjotk wrote:
Some deep digging on this ever-growing thread shows that user Berrie says:

Berrie wrote:
They try to deliver on the release date.


Seems like a trustworthy chap.


Thanks a lot Anr, for taking the trouble!


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 08:01 GMT 
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I don’t think anybody is implying that Dylan is “on a cross” in the cover image, (though, to adopt the vernacular he was “crucified” for his choices by a substantial portion of his fans and critics alike during this period) just that the arms outstretched pose has undeniably held significance in most Western Christian art for the last couple of millennia. Whether the picture shows Dylan as crassly and judgementally “finger pointing” at the eternally damned or the saved (like the hand of God on the eponymous album) is an entirely different matter, and one observation doesn't necessarily rule out the other.

On another matter, it’s great to see times never change, and everybody is involved in the wonderful ER tradition of greeting the news of a new BS release by a) moaning about the price, b) disliking the cover art & c) ordering the thing and speculating when it will arrive.


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 09:18 GMT 
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The way Bobs work is dissected Charles he must sometimes feel like hes on a cross.

As for Album covers are any of them that good? and isnt it the content we are interested in anyway?

Iron Maiden do some great covers if you like cover art, and I quite like their music too but honestly is a cover why we buy a record?


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 09:19 GMT 
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charlesdarwin wrote:
it’s great to see times never change, and everybody is involved in the wonderful ER tradition of greeting the news of a new BS release by a) moaning about the price, b) disliking the cover art & c) ordering the thing and speculating when it will arrive.


This made me smile.


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 09:40 GMT 
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Johanna Parker wrote:
Wasn't amazon.fr the best deal last time?

Or Bull Moose?


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 10:07 GMT 
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Amazon UK now at £121.23 for the Deluxe.


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 10:16 GMT 
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Desolation Row wrote:
The way Bobs work is dissected Charles he must sometimes feel like hes on a cross.


She walked up to me so gracefully and took my crown of thorns

In a little hilltop village, they gambled for my clothes
I bargained for salvation an’ they gave me a lethal dose
I offered up my innocence and got repaid with scorn


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PostPosted: Wed September 27th, 2017, 10:20 GMT 
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Are you all getting the Deluxe edition ? :? Merry Christmas, from me to me.

Amazon Canada CDN$ 227.40 & FREE Shipping

Our Pre-order Price Guarantee covers one or more item(s) in this order. If the Amazon.ca price decreases between the time you place your order and the end of the day of the release date, you'll receive the lowest price.

interesting..


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