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PostPosted: Sun July 30th, 2017, 15:16 GMT 

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the bobber has had only one golden period and that was the sixties. noting else he has done will ever measure up to that period of absolute genius


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PostPosted: Sun July 30th, 2017, 15:22 GMT 
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restless fever wrote:
I've heard that 10/20/03 marks the end of a certain NET era.
What's the argument behind this claim?

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PostPosted: Sun July 30th, 2017, 17:15 GMT 
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RichardW wrote:
For me it is the departure of Larry Campbell. Since Campbell left the band has been pedestrian in many different ways but always pedestrian.

Concerning Stu Kimball - there are some shows in the summer of 2004 which I really enjoy. I think it's a shame the Campbell-Kimball line-up didn't last longer. Kimball was fine on lead with Campbell playing everything else.

Dylan's decision to replace Campbell with three people was ill-considered. The band has never really recovered. The rhythmic flexibility was lost and the sound became too muddy.

If I had to pick a best year it would be 2000.


Why was he replaced?

I miss him.


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PostPosted: Sun July 30th, 2017, 17:18 GMT 
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restless fever wrote:
I've heard that 10/20/03 marks the end of a certain NET era.




One of the best tours was Autumn 2003


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PostPosted: Mon July 31st, 2017, 12:37 GMT 

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Hello shooting star night :D

There's some gems from fall 03. I picked up the 10/20 show based on a recommendation and it's my favorite from that tour. Bob really seems to find his voice and the whole band rises to the occasion. I'm sure NET experts can find stuff from later on that's as good or better. I don't listen to many shows after that run anymore.


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PostPosted: Mon July 31st, 2017, 15:22 GMT 
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shooting_star_night wrote:
depp91 wrote:
1997 - Good stuff.

1998 - Good stuff.

1999 - The spring shows are fun, even though Bob has that whiney voice that I can't listen to for a longer period. The summer shows that I listened to bored me. The fall shows might be the best that Bob ever delivered during the NET, they are simply fantastic. There, his voice has a presence that leaves awe-stricken.

2000 - Another great year and again, I think the spring and fall shows rank among the best the NET has ever had to offer.

2001 - Probably more patchy than the previous years, but the fall shows had many highlights. Just think of Spokane, Milwaukee, Grand Rapids oder New York.

2002 - Awful. The summer shows are dreadful - Bob could please stop upsinging every damn line? Things get better in the fall and there are some great shows there - Red Bluff, Los Angeles, Fairfax. Bob's switch to piano, some new arrangements as well as a few new covers clearly invigorated him.

2003 - The same amount of upsinging as the previous year. Again, things improve during the fall tour, even though they don't reach the heights of previous fall tour.

2004 - A noticeable step in the right direcion. Bob's voice is ragged throughout the year, but he utilizes it to great effect!

2005 - Things go downhill again...



Keep going to present year/day.
I can't comment on 2006 until now, because I haven't heard any complete shows from those years (besides the two I attended in 2015).

To actually answer the OP's question, I'd say the fall tour 2001 marked the end of that particular NET era. Granted, the sound didn't change until fall 2002, but most of 2002's shows were uninspired and Bob developed his habit of excessive upsinging.

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PostPosted: Mon July 31st, 2017, 16:07 GMT 

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1997- spring...particular Albany top notch. Some August shows are done well.

1998- Euro Summer pretty fun stuff...but as a whole year pretty thin imo

1999- Feb is dynamite. Larry just smokes from start to finish. Not a fan of euro or summer shows. Fall is great

2000- Spring is grand. But oct/September is to remember.

2001- Love April/May shows. Summer is a little sloppy but still good. Fall is great.

2002- Feb Shows are among my favorites. Love the rawness of band and voice. Euro he seems a little less passionate. Fall is a new ball game and pretty good.

2003- Fall is fun but nowhere near the previous years and noticeable drop.

2004- Spring tour is high octane good gasoline for the fire...but the center does not continue to hold.


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 15:47 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 29th, 2009, 13:31 GMT
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Never heard this about Buddy Miller before-- who I love. Can anybody point to sources or confirm this?

Joe

Still Go Barefoot wrote:
Great thread.
People's opinions seem pretty spot-on, even when conflicting!

I guess I'd vote straight across the musician configuration as defining each Era.
Losing Larry was difficult and also the obvious (IMHO) end to the Era in question.

Freddy was OK, but got old after awhile. Perfect timing for his departure.

It was exciting during the Duke / Charlie / Colin shift-up...only to come back around to Charlie.
Still can't believe Buddy Miller turned down the chance. Good excuse though & got Colin a try-out.

I'm still trying to figure out what Stu does besides accept low pay & drive the bus.
Nice guy though.

Donny's just a good boy doing exactly as he's told.

George & Tony are rhythmic monsters, in a very good way.


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 15:54 GMT 

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For me, I first saw Dylan in '97. I found '98 a bit weaker than '97, but still good stuff. I think 1999 and 2000 are probably the one of the real peaks of live Dylan-- at least, post 1981 live Dylan. 2001 felt a little more hit and miss, and 2002 could alternate wildly between "This sucks" and "This is brilliant". Sometimes in the same show. Hell, sometimes in the same SONG. But there are a lot of '02 shows I listen to, especially from the fall piano tour.

At the time, I didn't get 2003. That said, around 2010, I went through a period where I fell in love with Freddy's first tour, the spring US one. There's a lot of good stuff in there. Freddy was never dull, whatever else could be said about him. Never lost the conviction that he played the way Dylan was trying to play on the guitar.

I really haven't kept up the same way since those three brilliant London shows to end 2003. I liked 2004 well enough, and early 2005 was brilliant. I dug the new songs in Fall '06. The last tour I really listened to was the Euro Spring 2007,which felt a lot like those inconsistent '02 shows, but with declining return.

The organ was an abomination, and the last few years are competent but quickly redundant. I can't imagine listening to 20-30 shows with the same setlist. I struggled with it on the '66 set, and we all know how great THAT was.

Anyway, there's my $.02.

Joe


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 16:14 GMT 
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The summer and fall 2002 shows were outstanding. I don't get the hate. His voice fell off in 2003.


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 17:44 GMT 
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There was quite a shift from Fall 2003 to Spring 2004. Spring 2004 is without question the greatest sounding live period and Freddy Koella's departure for the summer tour signaled the end of theat great era.

Each tour from 1997 through 2003 had some incredible moments and every show is pretty much spot on. I am no fan of the 2003 Tour Down Under (with Billy Burnette) but I've seen posts from people that attended and enjoyed it. The remainder of the 2003 tour with Freddy is pretty spectacular and the Summer shows frequently had guests joining the band with some beautiful performances... Not to be missed!

The November 2003 London shows would probably be THE pinnacle of the era were it not for the April 26 NOLA Jazz Festival show with Dickie Landry on saxophone, voted the greatest musical performance in the history of the universe by the Intergalactic Council Council on Musical Awesomeness. (Trust me, those folks know a thing or two about music!!!)


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 19:41 GMT 

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I was at that April 2003 New Orleans jazz fest show with Dickie Landry on sax and it was the greatest Dylan show I've ever seen. Feb 2002 was also a great and overlooked run. I actually really like the spring and fall 2009 shows but summer was terrible that year. I actually like the overall sound of the band now better than the Campbell era band, but I think the Campbell bands were better at jamming out. That being said, I really wish Koella would have lasted longer, he's the best guitarist ever to play with Dylan in my humble opinion because he really knew music theory and harmony and wasn't afraid to take a risk and completely fall flat. He had some epic failure solos, but those failures were always interesting as hell even if they didn't work. I would rate Koella higher than Robertson/Clapton/GE Smith/Garcia. The Denny/Donnie years suffered from the exact opposite affliction, they just played it so safe there were never any really any interesting solos, it was all so damn predictable.


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 21:08 GMT 
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goodnitesteve wrote:
I've been listening to three Workingman's Blues that I have on my Fiio X1. One is from October 31st, 2006. This is probably my favorite performance of the song. The way he sings, "lead me off in a cheerful dance" was magnificent. I think there's a great Simple Twist from that show..
Would be an awesome Spotify playlist


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 21:41 GMT 
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toilandblood546 wrote:
I actually like the overall sound of the band now better than the Campbell era band, but I think the Campbell bands were better at jamming out. That being said, I really wish Koella would have lasted longer, he's the best guitarist ever to play with Dylan in my humble opinion because he really knew music theory and harmony and wasn't afraid to take a risk and completely fall flat. He had some epic failure solos, but those failures were always interesting as hell even if they didn't work. I would rate Koella higher than Robertson/Clapton/GE Smith/Garcia. The Denny/Donnie years suffered from the exact opposite affliction, they just played it so safe there were never any really any interesting solos, it was all so damn predictable.



I agree 100%, Freddie really brought something special and it seemed like Dylan responded to it, too (though that might just be my impression).


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 22:14 GMT 
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Now I'm going to have to find the Freddy Compilation(s) :)


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 22:16 GMT 
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This one as well:



Santa Barbara, California
Santa Barbara Bowl

October 22, 2012







1. Watching The River Flow
2. Man In The Long Black Coat
3. Things Have Changed (with Freddy Koella on guitar)
4. Tangled Up In Blue (with Freddy Koella on guitar)
5. Cry A While
6. A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall
7. High Water (For Charley Patton)
8. Chimes Of Freedom
9. Highway 61 Revisited
10. Mississippi
11. Thunder On The Mountain
12. Ballad Of A Thin Man
13. Like A Rolling Stone
14. All Along The Watchtower

(encore)
15. Blowin' In The Wind


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PostPosted: Sun October 15th, 2017, 12:40 GMT 

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Untrodden Path wrote:
There was quite a shift from Fall 2003 to Spring 2004. Spring 2004 is without question the greatest sounding live period and Freddy Koella's departure for the summer tour signaled the end of theat great era.

Each tour from 1997 through 2003 had some incredible moments and every show is pretty much spot on. I am no fan of the 2003 Tour Down Under (with Billy Burnette) but I've seen posts from people that attended and enjoyed it. The remainder of the 2003 tour with Freddy is pretty spectacular and the Summer shows frequently had guests joining the band with some beautiful performances... Not to be missed!

The November 2003 London shows would probably be THE pinnacle of the era were it not for the April 26 NOLA Jazz Festival show with Dickie Landry on saxophone, voted the greatest musical performance in the history of the universe by the Intergalactic Council Council on Musical Awesomeness. (Trust me, those folks know a thing or two about music!!!)


I'm listeninh to it right now. Greatest show ever. But sadly, there isn't any song with Bob on acoustic guitar.


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PostPosted: Sun October 15th, 2017, 21:37 GMT 
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I'd say the piano era is as good if not better than anything that came before it. 2002 reinvigorates the Sexton/Campbell band and the Koella era is one of Bob's best by a country mile. While 2004 has a rough voice the performances are incredibly strong if you're listening to the right show. Whether the golden era ends with 2003 or 2005 is a tough one. While 2005 starts to feature more up-singing and the band is clearly more contained, there are some performances that rank right up there with the best. The Brixton run is fantastic and his final show in Dublin is a career highlight.

The organ - or rather the shitty way it's mixed - makes some fairly decent performances a bit of a drag to listen to and the cruel irony is that the mix/playing gets better over the years as Bob's voice gets worse. But look, it's Dylan, he's too interesting not to have strong performances scattered throughout some slightly underwhelming years so those who are interested can find a lot to love in 2006-2012.

Then of course 2013- is a second golden era of sorts.


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PostPosted: Sun October 15th, 2017, 23:49 GMT 
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RichardW wrote:
Yes, and there are some good shows with Stu Kimball on lead and Larry Campbell covering everything else. It was a viable band.

Viable yes, but not Golden Era NET stuff.
(June 2004 - November 2004)


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PostPosted: Mon October 16th, 2017, 03:37 GMT 
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There was a distinct change to Bob's show which coincides with the introduction of the keyboard in the fall of '02. The format of the show and song selection changed pretty dramatically at that point too. The acoustic segments of the show continued thru the year but ended then and would never return. So I think the fall '02 tour is basically the beginning of a new type of show though it retains some of the older "golden era" characteristics. If I had to pick one show to end the golden era it would be Aspen 9/1/02 (last show of the summer tour).


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PostPosted: Thu November 23rd, 2017, 20:45 GMT 
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I remember going to the philly new york shows in october i think of 01'. I loved how it sounded like he was literally dropping a bomb with it aint me babe....it aint meeeeeeeee..............BABBBBBEEEE. Gives me chills. His voice for the most part reminded me of that middle seventies period...hard rain stuff. Caught him in atlantic city of 2000. Great. The fall of 02' in philly. Brown suger was cool. Loved the show, not as much as the previous year. Voice was awesome. Show just felt different and i hold on to that 01' tour too tightly i think. In 11' at The Mann in Philly. Definitely different but i really loved Blind Willie McTell. Alot of barking. The stuff im hearing today just sounds lovely live

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PostPosted: Thu November 23rd, 2017, 23:46 GMT 
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I think the final show of the 2002 US Summer tour in Aspen, September 1 2002, is a very possible marker as the last show of that era being the last show Bob played in full on Guitar although Fairfax, November 22 2002, Charlie Sexton's (first) last show was an all time classic but I think in hindsight Fall 2002 and even more so Spring 2003 was a bit of a transitional era with Bob starting to play the majority of the show on the Keyboard, and settling in on a core group of songs from "Love & Theft", Time Out Of Mind (and later Modern Times, Together Through Life and Tempest, alongside a few reliable 60's classics basically set the foundations for the next decade or so of the Never Ending Tour.

A decent argument could be set for Larry Campbell's departure being the end of an era too, after over 700 shows with Bob, and it taking two (and originally three) people to replace him.

I guess its open to anyone's own opinion really but here are some important dates.


Aspen, September 1 2002 (Bob's final full show on Guitar)

Fairfax, November 22 2002 (Charlie Sexton's "Final" show)

Spring 2003 leading up to Cary, NC, May 13 2003 (Bob's last regular acoustic performance)

Boston, November 21 2004 (Larry Campbell's final show)

Personally I think I would have to go with Charlie's last show in Fairfax, but definitely a strong argument a transitional phase was already well underway by that time too.


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PostPosted: Fri November 24th, 2017, 02:23 GMT 

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Atlantic City - May 10 2003

Last regular acoustic guitar/electric guitar/piano/harp concert.


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PostPosted: Fri November 24th, 2017, 14:22 GMT 

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RichardW wrote:
For me it is the departure of Larry Campbell. Since Campbell left the band has been pedestrian in many different ways but always pedestrian.

Concerning Stu Kimball - there are some shows in the summer of 2004 which I really enjoy. I think it's a shame the Campbell-Kimball line-up didn't last longer. Kimball was fine on lead with Campbell playing everything else.

Dylan's decision to replace Campbell with three people was ill-considered. The band has never really recovered. The rhythmic flexibility was lost and the sound became too muddy.


This is my answer as well, though I think for me it has less to do with strict performance quality and more to do with the fact that this moment just feels like such a deliberately drawn line in the sand. 1988 is a far cry from 2004 but when you follow the gradual evolution of the performances year by year, despite the various vocal tics that came and went and the inevitable rises and falls in performance quality, the whole thing feels like a naturally evolving organism -- it covers a lot of ground but is ultimately part of one creative arc. With the personnel change in 2005, it felt like Bob abruptly decided on a very specific stylistic vision that he's been tinkering with and refining ever since. Weirdly inasmuch as the original sound felt so rooted in traditional country-and-western, the Sinatra stuff feels like a sort of endgame for this vision, a final realization of this configuration of his band's strengths. Either way, I've never really been able to fully absorb the post-2004 NET years into my regular listening routine; the music just feels very unexciting to me, totally devoid of that sense that fire could catch at a moment's notice and send the whole thing rocketing into the stratosphere. The years from 1988 to 2004, for all their differences, have that in common -- that feeling, even in weak shows, that Bob was always on the precipice of something that, if he'd just decide to lean into it, could blow your mind.


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