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Do you consider Street Legal a classic?
Yes 65%  65%  [ 85 ]
No 35%  35%  [ 46 ]
Total votes : 131
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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 03:05 GMT 
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wormington wrote:
Not for me. To me it ranks somewhere in the middle of the list among all his records. He´s got way better ones, he´s got way worse ones.
I like a few songs in there, including the often bashed Baby stop crying and Is your love in vain. My favorite is probably New pony with it´s killer riff. But overall I´d say song writing is only OK. And of course the production is very dated.



I couldn't put it better.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 03:35 GMT 
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Its a classic but its not a masterpiece.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 08:13 GMT 

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Yes, for sure.

I didn´t like it cause it sounds different after Desire but that´s it, great songs and Bob in fine voice.

My favourite is Senor.

:D


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 09:11 GMT 

Joined: Fri September 11th, 2015, 16:11 GMT
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Classic is a very vague term.

In my head, it refers to works that are not only great but are widely acknowledged to be so.

If you walked out of your house today and saw someone wearing a Blood on the Tracks t-shirt, you probably wouldn't be too surprised (depending on where you live), but if it was a Street-Legal one you probably would be.

So while I find it one of his most enjoyable post-1966 albums, I would have to say no.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 09:55 GMT 
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The Bard wrote:
Its a classic but its not a masterpiece.

Good way of putting it.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 12:21 GMT 
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Who in their right mind would consider this album a "classic"?

The relevant definitions from American Random House:

classic (n.)
-- an artist or artistic production considered a standard

-- a work that is honored as definitive in its field



Obviously neither remotely applies to Street-Legal.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 12:41 GMT 
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Do people agree that Street Legal is a classic?

Is my agreement necessary? If I disagree does that mean its not a classic? I'm not sure I would consider Street-Legal a classic but I like it a lot.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 13:52 GMT 
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It has its moments, though none that lasts the length of a song. I hear Bob trying to be good in a way he doesn't believe in anymore.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 14:49 GMT 
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wormington wrote:
Not for me. To me it ranks somewhere in the middle of the list among all his records. He´s got way better ones, he´s got way worse ones..

Totally agree.

I love 3 songs on the album -- Senor, Changing of the Guards and Where Are You Tonight.

The remaining songs range from "just okay" (e.g., New Pony) to "truly annoying" (Baby Stop Crying).


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 16:14 GMT 

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frenchdog wrote:
3 of his all time greatest tracks, I think you can probably guess which songs I'm talking about. Another song that flirts with genius (No Time To Think), 3 great pop songs and only one track that's somewhat flawed (Is Your Love In Vain?)

I think that between 75-78 he was pushing himself artistically more than any other time in his career. In many ways that renaissance culminates with Street Legal. There's just something so special about the album for me. Obviously it has a very different sound but I think this the only time he recaptures that mid-60's energy. I love much of his post-60's work but it usually feels like he's channelling a different muse.

Its astounding that it isn't usually classed amongst his classics. I assume that's because it sounds so unlike 'classic' Dylan. It star seems to be rising though and have seen quite a few brilliant songwriters cite it as an influence (Peter Perrett being a recent one I've clocked).


I'm sorry, I can't decide which 3 tracks you're referring to -- "Changing of the Guards," "Senor," and which other one?


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 17:10 GMT 
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It's a Classic to me.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 17:11 GMT 
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I drove it down Michigan Ave once, it seemed classic enough


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 21:04 GMT 
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In my top 10 personally. Not sure if some of you would agree to this,
but I think how you relate to Street Legal depends somewhat on your
temperament. On Street Legal we meet an artist who is emotionally frayed,
somewhat out of control, in limbo, drug and alcohol dependent,
and yet able to distill the chaos into music and poetry, still able to
chronicle his life in an accessible way. Street Legal is very successful
in conveying a mood of uncharted desolation and abandonment.
It moves many people on a very deep and visceral level.

People that have been through times like that in their lives tend
to relate to and understand Street Legal. Others who love the album
may not have had any of those experiences, but they instinctively
'get' it. But it's wasted on a good many people. They don't get it,
they feel the music is garish and dated, they feel the lyrics lack
focus and discipline.

The debate will never end. The two camps never seem to find
common ground.


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 21:56 GMT 

Joined: Thu January 28th, 2016, 11:16 GMT
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gerardv wrote:
In my top 10 personally. Not sure if some of you would agree to this,
but I think how you relate to Street Legal depends somewhat on your
temperament. On Street Legal we meet an artist who is emotionally frayed,
somewhat out of control, in limbo, drug and alcohol dependent,
and yet able to distill the chaos into music and poetry, still able to
chronicle his life in an accessible way. Street Legal is very successful
in conveying a mood of uncharted desolation and abandonment.
It moves many people on a very deep and visceral level.

People that have been through times like that in their lives tend
to relate to and understand Street Legal. Others who love the album
may not have had any of those experiences, but they instinctively
'get' it. But it's wasted on a good many people. They don't get it,
they feel the music is garish and dated, they feel the lyrics lack
focus and discipline.

The debate will never end. The two camps never seem to find
common ground.


This is exactly how I feel about the album but lacked the eloquence to express. There is most definitely something neurotic, yet exhilarating, about the record. Its Dylan at his most deranged and its pomp and sloppiness both contribute to it being such great art. This simultaneously, however, seems to alienate many fans who look for something else in Bob's work. That's probably why its the most decisive album in his discography (other than perhaps his Gospel albums, though that's largely down to theology and not music).


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 00:23 GMT 
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I don't see it as a classic. But it has its moments. And I listen to it often. Especially Where Are You Tonight, which is a kick in the gut. Been there, done that.


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 00:45 GMT 

Joined: Fri April 14th, 2017, 02:01 GMT
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it is one of my favourite albums that I listen to constantly. I can see why some don't like it, but like everything it's down to personal taste. I do think his voice is at it's best during the 70s.


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 03:37 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 25th, 2007, 21:54 GMT
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I think the last song seems to be where fans and detractors part company. I think the lyric is kind of scattershot and the vocal at times dismal. Singer even loses the lyric at one point. No Time to Think has a better lyric and not quite as lousy a vocal. Then there's the parenthetical thing in the song title. Journey Through Dark Heat? Oh my, B movie. Finally, there's Pasqua's Floyd Cramer quote which I can't banish try as I might. It was hard to disperse when it was a hit and worse once it became dentist office muzak.

The big successes on the record are the miniatures "Talk This Over" and "New Pony."

Go get me my pistol babe. Sure Bob. Where'd you put it? I'm cooking and sewing and big flowers are growing. Some real howlers for a classic.

I admit Senor improved when they finally mixed it twenty years later. The intended ominous beginning was finally somewhat ominous.


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 09:05 GMT 
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monklover wrote:
I think the last song seems to be where fans and detractors part company. I think the lyric is kind of scattershot and the vocal at times dismal. Singer even loses the lyric at one point. No Time to Think has a better lyric and not quite as lousy a vocal. Then there's the parenthetical thing in the song title. Journey Through Dark Heat? Oh my, B movie. Finally, there's Pasqua's Floyd Cramer quote which I can't banish try as I might. It was hard to disperse when it was a hit and worse once it became dentist office muzak.

The big successes on the record are the miniatures "Talk This Over" and "New Pony."

Go get me my pistol babe. Sure Bob. Where'd you put it? I'm cooking and sewing and big flowers are growing. Some real howlers for a classic.

I admit Senor improved when they finally mixed it twenty years later. The intended ominous beginning was finally somewhat ominous.


Bollocks.


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 09:33 GMT 
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monklover wrote:
I think the last song seems to be where fans and detractors part company. I think the lyric is kind of scattershot and the vocal at times dismal. Singer even loses the lyric at one point. No Time to Think has a better lyric and not quite as lousy a vocal. Then there's the parenthetical thing in the song title. Journey Through Dark Heat? Oh my, B movie. Finally, there's Pasqua's Floyd Cramer quote which I can't banish try as I might. It was hard to disperse when it was a hit and worse once it became dentist office muzak.

Couldn't disagree more. Where Are You Tonight has great lyrics and a terrific vocal.


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 10:47 GMT 

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Where are you tonight is up there with Bobs very best


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 12:03 GMT 

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It's in my top 3--possibly numero uno.


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 16:23 GMT 

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McG wrote:
Bollocks.


Oops, goring a sacred cow


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 18:04 GMT 

Joined: Wed March 22nd, 2017, 15:55 GMT
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I'm going to cast my vote secretly :D


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 18:38 GMT 

Joined: Thu January 28th, 2016, 11:16 GMT
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Pretty strong majority for the classic camp. And there's been a decent amount of voters too. Wonder what the result would have been 10-20 years ago.


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 20:15 GMT 
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Stone-cold classic.

I've always felt that if you had to use one album to best represent Bob's entire career AS A WHOLE, this would be the one. It's got the bold lyrical reach that he is praised for, some great melodies, some average production (which doesn't actually hurt an album like this IMO), you can hear the 80s creeping in, it's very ambitious but like all of his efforts, it doesn't manage to sell everybody on it.

This is in some ways a great litmus test album and would serve as a great Intro to Bob Dylan because it's got lots of highs and lows wrapped all together.

Huge classic for sure ....I always loved it, though if you had told me at age 16 that I would eventually prefer it to Desire by leaps (and it didn't take too long), I would have been surprised.


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