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PostPosted: Mon July 24th, 2017, 14:02 GMT 

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Strange but true, she was "Moaning Myrtle" in the Harry Potter films!


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PostPosted: Mon July 24th, 2017, 21:58 GMT 

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"Difficult to imagine the critics liking this production, not “musical” enough, not enough “drama” etc etc."


"Oh, and Conor McPherson doesn’t write “tosh” he wouldn’t know how to go about it, and he likes all of his old plays."


You're entitled to love the play, as much as I'm entitled to think it's drivel, but I genuinely don't know what you're going on about sir...


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PostPosted: Tue July 25th, 2017, 04:45 GMT 
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"In memory everything seems to happen to music.”
- T Williams


sparknotes


Which aspects of The Glass Menagerie are realistic?
Which aspects are the most nonrealistic?
What function do the nonrealistic elements serve?

In the Production Notes to The Glass Menagerie, Williams writes disparagingly of the “straight realistic play with its genuine Frigidaire and authentic ice cubes.” Generally, Williams found realism to be a flat, outdated, and insufficient way of approaching emotional experience. As a consequence, The Glass Menagerie is fundamentally a nonrealistic play. Distortion, illusion, dream, symbol, and myth are the tools by means of which the action onstage is endowed with beauty and meaning. A screen displays words and images relevant to the action; music intrudes with melodramatic timing; the lights rise or dim according to the mood onstage, not the time of day; symbols like the glass menagerie are hammered home in the dialogue without any attempt at subtlety. The play’s style may best be described as expressionistic—underlying meaning is emphasized at the expense of realism. The play’s lack of stylistic realism is further explained by the fact that the story is told from Tom’s memory. As Tom puts it, the fact that what we are seeing is a memory play means that “it is dimly lighted, it is sentimental, it is not realistic. In memory everything seems to happen to music.”

Though the style of the play is overwhelmingly nonrealistic, its content is a different matter. Williams also claimed that inventive stylistic devices like those he favored must never lead a play to “escape its responsibility of dealing with reality.” Emotions like Tom’s boredom, Amanda’s nostalgia, and Laura’s terror are conveyed with all the vividness of reality. So are the sorrowful hostility between Tom and Amanda and the quiet love between Tom and Laura. Similarly, the bleak lower-middle-class life of the Wingfield family is portrayed with a great deal of fidelity to historical and social realities. In fact, it often seems as if the main effect of the play’s nonrealistic style is to increase the sense of reality surrounding its content. The play, as Tom says, is committed to giving its audience “truth in the pleasant disguise of illusion.”


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PostPosted: Wed July 26th, 2017, 10:30 GMT 
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Interestingly, this claims that Conor McPherson was approached by Jeff Rosen, four years ago, to write the play.

https://inews.co.uk/essentials/culture/ ... inze-kene/


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 21:13 GMT 
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I'm amazed that this hasn't received more interest, given that it officially opened last night, the reviews are out today, etc.


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PostPosted: Thu July 27th, 2017, 22:20 GMT 

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waiting for a video boot


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PostPosted: Sun July 30th, 2017, 06:59 GMT 
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I saw it last night. It was well-enough acted in spite of some dreadful miscasting, and well-enough sung in spite of some baffling song choices employed in hideous medleys where the verse of one song is spliced between choruses of another, with no song ever being sung in full, as if the musical arranger came to realise that most of Dylan's song are too long and in many cases too weak to be used unmutilated, he helpfully set about mutilating them. Cheers for that!

The 'play' itself is a festering septic tank of rotten clichés and crass obviousness. For instance, two guests turn up late at night in a guesthouse - one is a boxer who has been wrongly imprisoned, one is a travelling Bible salesman. Now try and guess what songs they will sing...

Perhaps the nadir is an old couple singing 'Is your love in vain?' to each other - truly excruciatingly bad. But maybe the barn dance rendition of 'You ain't going nowhere' is worse? No, neither. As soon as the pitiful pugilist embarks on 'Hurricane' the whole moronic miscalculation that is the whole show is spectacularly encapsulated in one moment.


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PostPosted: Sun July 30th, 2017, 09:56 GMT 
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Location: I've just reached a place where the willow don't bend...
https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2017/ ... -mcpherson

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter ... 63891.html

5 stars from both the Independent and the Guardian - I HAVE TO SEE THIS.


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PostPosted: Sun July 30th, 2017, 14:22 GMT 

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The reviews for Conor McPherson's play are incredible … 5 stars abound. According to the programme, McPherson was approached by "Dylan's people" to write the play. It's set in Minnesota in 1934. There are twenty songs. Apart from the links to newspaper reviews under "News" I have reviewed it on my blog, with a complete list of the songs played.
https://peterviney.wordpress.com/stage/ ... h-country/


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PostPosted: Tue August 1st, 2017, 07:38 GMT 

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A further thought. Conor McPherson (His "The Weir" won the Best Play Award in 1997 -1998) was quoted in the programme. He says:

“A lot of fans love that Woody Guthrie dust bowl kind of Bob Dylan, with 16 verses and no chorus. But what I was looking for here were songs with more musical development in them, that had a bridge, a chorus, a middle eight, all that stuff, that give the performers the chance to lean into something emotionally and go deeper and deeper into the music.”

As I said in my review, it had me pulling New Morning and Infidels on the shelf for a listen.


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 23:01 GMT 
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I thought this play was remarkable. I found the whole thing impossibly moving. The songs - not because of their lyrics, but something less tangible about them: the melody, yes, the treatment; but the *feel* of them - gave us access to the characters that we wouldn't otherwise have had. Plenty of Dylan fans and sceptics alike have felt the same way, it seems. This production seems to have really tapped into the sense of desolation in Dylan's songs; a world in which they are folk songs, standards to sing at gatherings, and yet also musical soliloquies that lay bare the loneliness and heartbreak at the core of so many of his compositions. Tight Connection To My Heart, I Want You; I could go on. It's all so impossibly sad. Even the comparatively upbeat songs - Like A Rolling Stone, You Ain't Goin' Nowhere - are about loss and nihilism. And yet, by the time it's over, the whole effect is one of catharsis.

I can't recommend this highly enough. It's on for two more months.


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PostPosted: Wed August 2nd, 2017, 23:17 GMT 
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mojofilter wrote:
“Something There Is About You”
“Seven Days”
“Ballad of Hollis Brown”
“Tell Ol’ Bill”
“Shelter from the Storm”
“Walls of Red Wing”
“Forgetful Heart”
“Winterlude”
“Night after Night”


None of these songs was featured. The list in the programme is accurate; except it's missing All Along The Watchtower, and Jokerman is printed twice.


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PostPosted: Thu August 3rd, 2017, 02:16 GMT 

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Somebody Naked wrote:
mojofilter wrote:
“Something There Is About You”
“Seven Days”
“Ballad of Hollis Brown”
“Tell Ol’ Bill”
“Shelter from the Storm”
“Walls of Red Wing”
“Forgetful Heart”
“Winterlude”
“Night after Night”


None of these songs was featured. The list in the programme is accurate; except it's missing All Along The Watchtower, and Jokerman is printed twice.


Thanks for the correction. My source was someone who saw a workshop version of the play. Obviously there were quite a few changes before it opened.

Does it still have that interlude where Ophelia meets Donald White at the old dance hall on the outskirts of town? That sounded pretty memorable.


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PostPosted: Thu August 3rd, 2017, 08:30 GMT 
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mojofilter wrote:
Thanks for the correction. My source was someone who saw a workshop version of the play. Obviously there were quite a few changes before it opened.

Does it still have that interlude where Ophelia meets Donald White at the old dance hall on the outskirts of town? That sounded pretty memorable.


Over half the songs are from the 70s and 80s. Only a quarter of the songs are from the 60s. I don't know what was excised early on, but the integration of All Along The Watchtower into Hurricane presumably dates from after the programmes were printed.


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PostPosted: Thu August 3rd, 2017, 13:19 GMT 
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Location: I've just reached a place where the willow don't bend...
The wife has just surprised me with two tickets for the show on 23rd September for our 2nd weddin' anniversary - knew she was a keeper!


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PostPosted: Thu August 3rd, 2017, 19:18 GMT 
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Sheila Atim performs Bob Dylan's 'Tight Connection to My Heart' | GIRL FROM THE NORTH COUNTRY

video was posted yesterday on "The Old Vic" you tube channel

https://youtu.be/0grZUoUhn_k


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PostPosted: Thu August 3rd, 2017, 19:43 GMT 
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I've met Conor McPherson a few times in Dublin and am a great admirer of his work, particularly 'The Wayfarer'. I haven't been to GFTNC but look forward to it. Sam Shepard gives a nod to him in this video filmed at Trinity College Dublin around 07.05 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hC7o9Af6wOE&t=591s


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PostPosted: Thu August 3rd, 2017, 21:46 GMT 

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notdarkyet wrote:
Sheila Atim performs Bob Dylan's 'Tight Connection to My Heart' | GIRL FROM THE NORTH COUNTRY

video was posted yesterday on "The Old Vic" you tube channel

https://youtu.be/0grZUoUhn_k

nice


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PostPosted: Fri August 4th, 2017, 07:47 GMT 
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Just found this in a review:

"Even Dylan aficionados may not be familiar with “Idiot Wind"

I'm saying nothing.


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PostPosted: Tue August 8th, 2017, 21:52 GMT 
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As I was in London this days I went to see it last Friday.

I would title it "They ain't goin' nowhere".

The play is a forced story that goes nowhere to try to match the songs they play. As someone said, the songs are reasonabilly well performed. Some interesting, some are what uses to happen with covers of Bob's songs: they lose a lot. Anyway, it's a good thing there are some of them that has interesting arrangements and performances. I'd say the thing is better at the beggining and goes down. The most interesting ones for me aren't not very popular songs (I went to see the gypsy, Tight connection to my heart, Slow train, True love tends to forget...), and the thing goes wrong when the obvious choices appear (I want You, Like a rolling stone...). And, as I had read here, the Hurricane thing is the lowest point for me.

Anyway the interesting thing is the music. As a play I found it really poor. Boring. And, as someone said too, the cast is strange, and probably chosen for musical aspects. Anyway, most of the actors do reasonabilly well.

For me the thing was too long. 2 hours, plus a half an hour intermission. I guess scissors would have done good for that. No need for so many songs and, specially, so many things.

if anyone thinks in going to London specially to see this, there's no need. If You are there and have curisosity, You can go.


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PostPosted: Wed August 9th, 2017, 07:41 GMT 

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The play is 2 hours 10 minutes plus a 20 minute interval. That’s on the short side of average for London theatre, and it flies by. Unusually Act One is 10 minutes shorter than Act Two. The interest is that it’s NOT a musical. As to the quality of the play, I review plays 50 plus times a year, and I list “What The Critics Said” on nearly every one … scroll to the bottom of my review: https://peterviney.wordpress.com/stage/girl-from-the-north-country/
The seven prestige reviews are Guardian, Independent, Observer, Times … all five stars. Then Sunday Times, Daily Mail four stars. Telegraph three stars. That’s theatre critics, not music critics. I can assure you that gaining so many five star reviews from the quality newspapers is very rare (OK, maybe the Daily Mail doesn’t count as “quality” but Quentin Letts is an astute reviewer). My point is that to the theatre critics listed, Conor McPherson has written and directed a very good play.


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PostPosted: Wed August 9th, 2017, 22:48 GMT 
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Saw it today.

If you are on this site and you have the opportunity to see this play, then just go and see it. End of.

/


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PostPosted: Thu August 10th, 2017, 08:27 GMT 
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The Bard wrote:
If you are on this site and you have the opportunity to see this play, then just go and see it.


I agree entirely. You'll see something really quite special; and, even if you are in the huge minority and hate it, just think: you'll have an opinion which you can post on the internet.


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PostPosted: Thu August 10th, 2017, 10:35 GMT 
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I'm going to see it on September 9! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
Just booked a flight, a hostel (September 8-10) and my ticket. It'll be my first time in London... or outside continental Europe, for that matter. :)


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PostPosted: Thu August 10th, 2017, 19:11 GMT 

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what's security like?
a little bit of bootleg is impossible?


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