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PostPosted: Wed March 22nd, 2017, 13:19 GMT 
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Wonder if we'll be getting a "greatest of" stream soon? Or a leak somewhere. I'm craving it.

(Overstimulated American problems... New Chappelle, Breath of the Wild, new Bob Dylan... wonderful stuff)


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PostPosted: Wed March 22nd, 2017, 13:56 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 25th, 2007, 21:54 GMT
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SquareTotemPole wrote:
This is the AP review. Some positive comments ("his voice is surprisingly supple,
even lovely") but in an understated kind of way, the final paragraph is
rather devastating.


By DAVID BAUDER, AP Entertainment Writer

............
As well performed as the material is, the slower tempos allow a sense of sameness to creep in. "Triplicate" is more of a historical document than a contemporary recording, and absent a curiosity about songwriting of this era, some tedium is inevitable.


Is there songwriting of this era?


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PostPosted: Wed March 22nd, 2017, 15:19 GMT 

Joined: Tue January 6th, 2015, 15:03 GMT
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monklover wrote:
SquareTotemPole wrote:
This is the AP review. Some positive comments ("his voice is surprisingly supple,
even lovely") but in an understated kind of way, the final paragraph is
rather devastating.


By DAVID BAUDER, AP Entertainment Writer

............
As well performed as the material is, the slower tempos allow a sense of sameness to creep in. "Triplicate" is more of a historical document than a contemporary recording, and absent a curiosity about songwriting of this era, some tedium is inevitable.


Is there songwriting of this era?

????

The 30s/40s/50s was probably the golden age of songwriting.


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PostPosted: Wed March 22nd, 2017, 22:11 GMT 

Joined: Fri July 18th, 2008, 16:22 GMT
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The LA Times likes it https://www.google.ie/url?sa=t&source=w ... NH-r83lgXA


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PostPosted: Wed March 22nd, 2017, 22:23 GMT 
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SquareTotemPole wrote:
This is the AP review. Some positive comments ("his voice is surprisingly supple,
even lovely") but in an understated kind of way, the final paragraph is
rather devastating.


By DAVID BAUDER, AP Entertainment Writer

............
As well performed as the material is, the slower tempos allow a sense of sameness to creep in. "Triplicate" is more of a historical document than a contemporary recording, and absent a curiosity about songwriting of this era, some tedium is inevitable.


I too find a whole album of Dylan doing this pretty boring, however it seems to me that most of these songs, first time around, would not have been listened to one after the other, but on '78s as stand alone tracks. Hear 'em like that, dropped into a radio show for instance, and maybe that 'sameness' would be less apparent, and the quality (or not) of the individual track would stand more of a chance.

Or just release them on several hundred different Shellac 78s - that should sort the real fans from the Johnny-come-lately's!


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PostPosted: Thu March 23rd, 2017, 04:37 GMT 
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Quote:
"his voice is surprisingly supple,
even lovely"


From what I've heard, he sounds a little strained but the gravel throat and the Leon Redbone sound is gone, which is a good thing. If he could keep the subtle thing going and deliver some originals that invoke the standards, then we might really be on to something.


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PostPosted: Thu March 23rd, 2017, 15:30 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 25th, 2007, 21:54 GMT
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mjmooney wrote:
monklover wrote:

Is there songwriting of this era?

????

The 30s/40s/50s was probably the golden age of songwriting.


Sorry, I meant our current era. Don't know about the fifties, but 20s and 30s were a golden era of songwriting.


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PostPosted: Thu March 23rd, 2017, 16:22 GMT 

Joined: Mon November 15th, 2010, 20:04 GMT
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Location: Tyneside UK
I know what you mean monklover. The 20s to 30s was the era of proper songs, with developing lyrics, maybe following a light operatic style. After that popular music became more dependent on rhythm and beat, with the lyrics in second place.
Apart from people like Bob.


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PostPosted: Thu March 23rd, 2017, 16:43 GMT 
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Senac wrote:
I know what you mean monklover. The 20s to 30s was the era of proper songs, with developing lyrics, maybe following a light operatic style. After that popular music became more dependent on rhythm and beat, with the lyrics in second place.
Apart from people like Bob.


I see you've been using your Christmas present - well done!

Image


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PostPosted: Thu March 23rd, 2017, 17:11 GMT 

Joined: Mon November 15th, 2010, 20:04 GMT
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Location: Tyneside UK
:D I don't care!


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PostPosted: Thu March 23rd, 2017, 20:21 GMT 
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slimtimslide wrote:
SquareTotemPole wrote:
This is the AP review. Some positive comments ("his voice is surprisingly supple,
even lovely") but in an understated kind of way, the final paragraph is
rather devastating.


By DAVID BAUDER, AP Entertainment Writer

............
As well performed as the material is, the slower tempos allow a sense of sameness to creep in. "Triplicate" is more of a historical document than a contemporary recording, and absent a curiosity about songwriting of this era, some tedium is inevitable.


I too find a whole album of Dylan doing this pretty boring, however it seems to me that most of these songs, first time around, would not have been listened to one after the other, but on '78s as stand alone tracks. Hear 'em like that, dropped into a radio show for instance, and maybe that 'sameness' would be less apparent, and the quality (or not) of the individual track would stand more of a chance.

Or just release them on several hundred different Shellac 78s - that should sort the real fans from the Johnny-come-lately's!


The sameness (especially the tempos) has to do with the way the Dylan versions of these tunes are arranged. On the old 78's, like you're comparing them to, there is more variety to be found, even when the same songs are performed over again by different bands, orchestras and vocalists.


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PostPosted: Fri March 24th, 2017, 11:58 GMT 
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understanding where Dylan is coming from enhances my appreciation of songs/ albums;

'These songs are some of the most heartbreaking stuff ever put on record and I wanted to do them justice.
Now that I have lived them and lived through them I understand them better...

These songs are cold and clear-sighted, there is a direct realism in them, faith in ordinary life just like in early rock and roll'


great stuff... imo songs from recent albums are the highlights of shows too.

TGIF :D


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PostPosted: Fri March 24th, 2017, 15:10 GMT 

Joined: Tue January 6th, 2015, 15:03 GMT
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We were given fair warning about all this, by Bob, in 1968. From the John Wesley Harding sleeve notes:

"Faith is the key!" said the first king. "No, froth is the key!" said the second. "You're both wrong," said the third, "the key is Frank!"


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PostPosted: Sat March 25th, 2017, 09:31 GMT 

Joined: Fri July 18th, 2008, 16:22 GMT
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Irish Examiner review

https://www.google.ie/amp/amp.irishexam ... 46095.html


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PostPosted: Sat March 25th, 2017, 11:24 GMT 
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Even Neil McCormick seems finally to have had enough.

From today's Telegraph 3-star review:

DYLAN DISHES UP HIS LEFTOVERS

I think it is fair to say that Triplicate is an act of self-indulgence only of interest to Dylan completists. If you were to stray into a room where it was playing you might wonder how anyone could have allowed such a ropy old singer to gurgle his way through such beautiful melodies. But should you linger a while, something wonderful might happen.
Seduced by the sensitive playing of Dylan's stripped-back Americana group, in arrangements peeling away big band clichés, you might find yourself drawn into Dylan's peculiar rhythm, surrendering to the delicate mood, and really hearing these gorgeous old songs anew.
Occasional lines jerk out of the mix as Dylan struggles for control of his vocal cords. But his unique phrasing and delivery is usually right on the nose of the song's meaning. On many tracks a low, resonant cello saws beneath Dylan's gritty tone, their oaky timbre blending into one. The frailty of his stretched, long notes carries a weight of experience, like a tree stripped bare in winter. Over 90 minutes, this is a set that casts a hypnotic musical spell.
But enough already. We might be intrigued to read Picasso's poetry or hear Pinter's songbook but no one needs five volumes of it. Now it is surely time to find out what all of this is bringing to Dylan's own original art.
After all, he didn't win the Nobel Prize for crooning.


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 18:37 GMT 
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"Now it is surely time to find out what all of this is bringing to Dylan's own original art."

And there it is.


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 18:40 GMT 
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We're just gonna have to wait.


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 18:43 GMT 
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TELEGRAPH wrote:
...Seduced by the sensitive playing of Dylan's stripped-back Americana group, in arrangements peeling away big band clichés, you might find yourself drawn into Dylan's peculiar rhythm, surrendering to the delicate mood, and really hearing these gorgeous old songs anew...his unique phrasing and delivery is usually right on the nose of the song's meaning. On many tracks a low, resonant cello saws beneath Dylan's gritty tone, their oaky timbre blending into one. The frailty of his stretched, long notes carries a weight of experience, like a tree stripped bare in winter. Over 90 minutes, this is a set that casts a hypnotic musical spell.


At least we have this to enjoy in the meantime.


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 19:02 GMT 
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mjmooney wrote:
We were given fair warning about all this, by Bob, in 1968. From the John Wesley Harding sleeve notes:

"Faith is the key!" said the first king. "No, froth is the key!" said the second. "You're both wrong," said the third, "the key is Frank!"


:lol:


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 19:58 GMT 
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smoke wrote:
TELEGRAPH wrote:
...Seduced by the sensitive playing of Dylan's stripped-back Americana group, in arrangements peeling away big band clichés, you might find yourself drawn into Dylan's peculiar rhythm, surrendering to the delicate mood, and really hearing these gorgeous old songs anew...his unique phrasing and delivery is usually right on the nose of the song's meaning. On many tracks a low, resonant cello saws beneath Dylan's gritty tone, their oaky timbre blending into one. The frailty of his stretched, long notes carries a weight of experience, like a tree stripped bare in winter. Over 90 minutes, this is a set that casts a hypnotic musical spell.


At least we have this to enjoy in the meantime.


If you were to stray into a room where it was playing you might wonder how anyone could have allowed such a ropy old singer to gurgle his way through such beautiful melodies.


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 20:08 GMT 
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If you were to stray into a room where it was playing you might wonder how anyone could have allowed such a ropy old singer to gurgle his way through such beautiful melodies.[/b][/i][/quote]

"Some words laid down end to end that express whether or not I love or hate this whole idea of Dylan singing standards."


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 20:10 GMT 
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mumbles wrote:
"Now it is surely time to find out what all of this is bringing to Dylan's own original art."


10 new songs in the vein of Beyond the Horizon and Spirit on the Water?


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 21:14 GMT 

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yopietro wrote:
mumbles wrote:
"Now it is surely time to find out what all of this is bringing to Dylan's own original art."


10 new songs in the vein of Beyond the Horizon and Spirit on the Water?


Horizon is one of 2 or 3 tracks on Modern Times I can enjoy. I'm with you on Spirit, though.


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 22:36 GMT 
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I am amazed that the haters want Bob to fail with Triplicate instead of keeping an open mind


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PostPosted: Sun March 26th, 2017, 22:46 GMT 
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goodmeats wrote:
I am amazed that the haters want Bob to fail with Triplicate instead of keeping an open mind

What is this repetition about "The Haters"?
I feel like I'm in a Harry Potter thread.


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