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PostPosted: Fri May 26th, 2017, 17:57 GMT 

Joined: Sun August 7th, 2016, 19:04 GMT
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Sadly no evidence other than my memory, but I guarantee that he was wearing the checked suit and Robbie the white, here's my account of it from memory pre 66 box release, which has been posted here before......

May 27th 1966 Royal Albert Hall

Some memories

I was 16 and had been living and breathing Dylan since early 65, unknown to me he’d entered my DNA via “The Madhouse on Castle Street” which I’d watched with my parents who were horrified at the singing, it sounded good to me and if your parents don’t like it…well what better excuse. I filed that away and about that time my elder brother began a subscription to “Billboard” magazine, in which started to appear large advertisements for “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan”, I still didn’t make the connection between the two. My favourite band in 64 were “The Animals” and Eric Burdon started to namedrop Dylan in interviews and songs, finally it all came together and I was smitten.

In 65 I started work and spent my first weekly wage on the “Bob Dylan”LP. I then bought each album in order of release as I could afford them. I made no attempt to see him at The Royal Albert Hall in 65, in fact I have no recollection of the gig being advertised or even taking place until reading the reviews. But in 66 I was ready!

Living in Surrey I was only an hours journey to London, so I got on a train and bought a ticket from the RAH box office, it cost £1 and was the top price, the man in the booth told me that ‘it was a good ticket”. He was right it was a stalls seat, for those of you who don’t know the RAH, the stalls are the slightly raised area encircling the arena the area in front of the stage which traditionally would be called the stalls in any conventional theatre. My seat was at about the 2 O’clock position and had great sight lines.

There is no curtain in front of the stage at the RAH so you could clearly see the amps and drum riser even for the acoustic part of the show, so even if you hadn’t read any of the press reports you knew that something was about to happen.

The lights dimmed and a spotlight hit the stage, Dylan entered stage right wearing the hounds tooth suit(which I would refer to as Rupert Bear check for many years after!), my side, clutching a handful of harmonicas making his way to the stool positioned at the microphone. His hair was amazing and where was the leather sports jacket that I’d lusted after and finally found a version of?

All goes very well until the start of a new song,( “VOJ”) where we got the “this is not a drug song’ rap, someone shouts “we’re with you Bob” from way up above me, in fact you can just hear this on the Gelston acetate recording, after which our hero answers “yes all right.”

He drops a harmonica before one of the songs and does a funny Chaplinesque stoop down to pick it up, the audience laugh at which Dylan says “don’t do that., that’s terrible again clearly audible on the Gelston recording.

The harmonica solo in “Baby Blue” is spellbinding, it floats around that huge hall which in those days had quite an echo depending upon where you sat, long before the saucer structures were hung from the ceiling in an attempt to “cure’ this. The security in those days consisted of elderly gentlemen in slightly military uniforms and hats, the one at the door nearest to me looked totally mesmerised by this song. Then it was “Mr T Man” lots of applause and intermission.

Now remember that the amps and drums have been visible throughout. When Dylan and The Hawks hit the stage (Robbie in the white striped suit) there is mixed applause and derision, the atmosphere has changed, Dylan has changed, he’s pumped up now in complete contrast to the quiet reservation of the first half. It’s loud, but no problem to me as I’ve been going to rock gigs since I was 13 years old, Little Richard at Kingston Granada anyone, and been fed a diet of Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters by my brother.

When they do “One Too Many” and I Don’t Believe You” I start to get a bit agitated, I didn’t see why he had to amp up what I perceived to be ‘folk songs’ that I’d been besotted with for a year or more, yes I wasn’t totally ready for the electrification, I loved the already familiar new rock songs though.

Dylan is very animated he keeps throwing his arms around Robbie’s neck, which for a Surrey boy of 16 is quite shocking!

Someone struts forward at each chorus to share the microphone in “One too Many Mornings”, with hindsight probably Rick Danko.

There is a lot of booing and shouting and people do leave. I’m totally shocked that people could buy a ticket to someone they wanted to see and then boo.

Two girls next to me are worried that “he’ll walk off in a minute”, it was clear to me that he wouldn’t, he seemed to be almost enjoying it and was in a way in control. Now of course with the knowledge of he Pennebaker footage in “No Direction Home“ we can assume that he was part elated at the thought of it being the last gig and he was going home.

‘LARS” is long and then it’s all over, it all passed very quickly. I wish I could remember more.

I do remember walking along Exhibition Road (I may have levitated) back to the tube station that I really didn’t know if I loved or hated the man. It was that good.

I dreamt in colour that night, something I rarely ever did or do.

In 1970 a good friend of mine Jeff Thomas, sadly no longer with us, called me up and played me a tape down the phone, it was he said Dylan at RAH the electric half, it was amazing. Well I knew it wasn’t the May 27th set but it could have been the night before, it was of course the Manchester gig. It was long before any bootlegs of this existed, and as far as I’m aware was one of only a few copies in the country at that time.

Footnote

A few years ago I was invited to a friends dinner party and Dennis one of the guests, now no longer with us, told the story of how he went to see Peter Paul and Mary at the Royal Festival Hall in 1964, after the show he and his friends went for a drink at a pub near the venue only to find that Peter Yarrow was also having a drink there. They told him how much they had enjoyed the gig and he remarked that if they’d enjoyed that, then they must go and see “a friend of his called Bob Dylan” who was going to perform there in a few weeks time, “he’s sensational” he told them. Dennis went and was totally underwhelmed, apparently Dylan didn’t speak at all between songs, but he did remember that he sang “Mr Tambourine Man”. At that dinner party you had three people who had seen Dylan in 64, 65 (the host) and myself 66, there can’t be many instances of that surely.

Chris


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PostPosted: Fri May 26th, 2017, 18:05 GMT 
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Zeppelin Crumble wrote:
Following the show, Brian and Keith went to Blaise's nightclub, a few hundred yards away in nearby Queensgate.


The same club where Dylan and Dana Gillespie went to see John Lee Hooker on May 3rd. Wondering now: if it was in Queensgate, did they shoot the "clip my dog" sequence on the way...?

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=89863&start=100#p1749643


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PostPosted: Fri May 26th, 2017, 18:07 GMT 
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ChristopherG wrote:
Sadly no evidence other than my memory, but I guarantee that he was wearing the checked suit and Robbie the white, here's my account of it from memory pre 66 box release, which has been posted here before......

May 27th 1966 Royal Albert Hall

Some memories

I was 16 and had been living and breathing Dylan since early 65, unknown to me he’d entered my DNA via “The Madhouse on Castle Street” which I’d watched with my parents who were horrified at the singing, it sounded good to me and if your parents don’t like it…well what better excuse. I filed that away and about that time my elder brother began a subscription to “Billboard” magazine, in which started to appear large advertisements for “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan”, I still didn’t make the connection between the two. My favourite band in 64 were “The Animals” and Eric Burdon started to namedrop Dylan in interviews and songs, finally it all came together and I was smitten.

In 65 I started work and spent my first weekly wage on the “Bob Dylan”LP. I then bought each album in order of release as I could afford them. I made no attempt to see him at The Royal Albert Hall in 65, in fact I have no recollection of the gig being advertised or even taking place until reading the reviews. But in 66 I was ready!

Living in Surrey I was only an hours journey to London, so I got on a train and bought a ticket from the RAH box office, it cost £1 and was the top price, the man in the booth told me that ‘it was a good ticket”. He was right it was a stalls seat, for those of you who don’t know the RAH, the stalls are the slightly raised area encircling the arena the area in front of the stage which traditionally would be called the stalls in any conventional theatre. My seat was at about the 2 O’clock position and had great sight lines.

There is no curtain in front of the stage at the RAH so you could clearly see the amps and drum riser even for the acoustic part of the show, so even if you hadn’t read any of the press reports you knew that something was about to happen.

The lights dimmed and a spotlight hit the stage, Dylan entered stage right wearing the hounds tooth suit(which I would refer to as Rupert Bear check for many years after!), my side, clutching a handful of harmonicas making his way to the stool positioned at the microphone. His hair was amazing and where was the leather sports jacket that I’d lusted after and finally found a version of?

All goes very well until the start of a new song,( “VOJ”) where we got the “this is not a drug song’ rap, someone shouts “we’re with you Bob” from way up above me, in fact you can just hear this on the Gelston acetate recording, after which our hero answers “yes all right.”

He drops a harmonica before one of the songs and does a funny Chaplinesque stoop down to pick it up, the audience laugh at which Dylan says “don’t do that., that’s terrible again clearly audible on the Gelston recording.

The harmonica solo in “Baby Blue” is spellbinding, it floats around that huge hall which in those days had quite an echo depending upon where you sat, long before the saucer structures were hung from the ceiling in an attempt to “cure’ this. The security in those days consisted of elderly gentlemen in slightly military uniforms and hats, the one at the door nearest to me looked totally mesmerised by this song. Then it was “Mr T Man” lots of applause and intermission.

Now remember that the amps and drums have been visible throughout. When Dylan and The Hawks hit the stage (Robbie in the white striped suit) there is mixed applause and derision, the atmosphere has changed, Dylan has changed, he’s pumped up now in complete contrast to the quiet reservation of the first half. It’s loud, but no problem to me as I’ve been going to rock gigs since I was 13 years old, Little Richard at Kingston Granada anyone, and been fed a diet of Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters by my brother.

When they do “One Too Many” and I Don’t Believe You” I start to get a bit agitated, I didn’t see why he had to amp up what I perceived to be ‘folk songs’ that I’d been besotted with for a year or more, yes I wasn’t totally ready for the electrification, I loved the already familiar new rock songs though.

Dylan is very animated he keeps throwing his arms around Robbie’s neck, which for a Surrey boy of 16 is quite shocking!

Someone struts forward at each chorus to share the microphone in “One too Many Mornings”, with hindsight probably Rick Danko.

There is a lot of booing and shouting and people do leave. I’m totally shocked that people could buy a ticket to someone they wanted to see and then boo.

Two girls next to me are worried that “he’ll walk off in a minute”, it was clear to me that he wouldn’t, he seemed to be almost enjoying it and was in a way in control. Now of course with the knowledge of he Pennebaker footage in “No Direction Home“ we can assume that he was part elated at the thought of it being the last gig and he was going home.

‘LARS” is long and then it’s all over, it all passed very quickly. I wish I could remember more.

I do remember walking along Exhibition Road (I may have levitated) back to the tube station that I really didn’t know if I loved or hated the man. It was that good.

I dreamt in colour that night, something I rarely ever did or do.

In 1970 a good friend of mine Jeff Thomas, sadly no longer with us, called me up and played me a tape down the phone, it was he said Dylan at RAH the electric half, it was amazing. Well I knew it wasn’t the May 27th set but it could have been the night before, it was of course the Manchester gig. It was long before any bootlegs of this existed, and as far as I’m aware was one of only a few copies in the country at that time.

Footnote

A few years ago I was invited to a friends dinner party and Dennis one of the guests, now no longer with us, told the story of how he went to see Peter Paul and Mary at the Royal Festival Hall in 1964, after the show he and his friends went for a drink at a pub near the venue only to find that Peter Yarrow was also having a drink there. They told him how much they had enjoyed the gig and he remarked that if they’d enjoyed that, then they must go and see “a friend of his called Bob Dylan” who was going to perform there in a few weeks time, “he’s sensational” he told them. Dennis went and was totally underwhelmed, apparently Dylan didn’t speak at all between songs, but he did remember that he sang “Mr Tambourine Man”. At that dinner party you had three people who had seen Dylan in 64, 65 (the host) and myself 66, there can’t be many instances of that surely.

Chris


Thank you, Chris. Fabulous stuff! And great to hear what "yes, all right" is a response to. And the arm around Robbie Robertson! Predating Bowie and Ronson by a fair bit. Thanks again.


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PostPosted: Fri May 26th, 2017, 19:19 GMT 
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Let's all give thanks to this man, too. He was being paid, it was his job, and what a job he did, but by his own account it nearly broke him, too.


Image


Here is an extract from my email exchange with Richard in January, previously published on the SHF thread and linked to on the box set thread on ER:-


Have you found time to listen closely to all your recordings on the CDs in the box, I wonder? Are there any CDs that you are particularly proud of and that present the sound as you heard it on the night? In your interviews I noticed that you seem to have a soft spot for Liverpool. [I’m] married to someone who was at RAH…


Liverpool is my favorite, but there are many great performances scattered throughout. The tapes sound just like I remember them. First or second RAH concert?


My wife attended RAH 1… she didn't boo; on the contrary, she enjoyed every minute of being there. Listening to the discs brought back some memories for her, although personally I wish Sony had included your recording of May 26 as well as the Columbia one.


Several people have said that they wished Sony had released my tapes of what CBS also recorded. So do I. The first RAH concert was great. The second funny and curious, everyone was so exhausted.


One of the fascinating features of the “Untold Story…” promo video was seeing the (acoustic) soundcheck of “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window” at London’s RAH. I wonder if you can remember any other unusual soundcheck songs, either acoustic or electric, between Honolulu and London?


Maybe deep hypnosis would help. I’m still waiting for someone to say they got my Nouvelle Vague joke in the Sony film interview.


Well, I have schoolboy French so I believe I grasped your comment in the Sony video about Bob’s film being “New Wave” while simultaneously describing “Eat the Document as “vague”.


My French is just good enough to make a corny bi-lingual pun!


Take a bow, Richard Alderson...I take his comment about the contrast between the RAH shows to suggest that serious end-of-tour partying happened a day earlier than perhaps it should have, hence "everyone was so exhausted" on the last night.



My wife has only listened to the RAH 1 CDs. Her memory of the night prior to listening to them was vague to say the least (apart from remembering exactly what she was wearing and which pills she was popping!). However, she's pretty certain that there was much more going on between songs than is evident on the recording. Much more tuning and talking between numbers in the acoustic set, and more "interaction" between songs on the electric set. It could be that RAH 1 was edited more tightly for the 2CD and vinyl releases. If so, it's a dirty rotten shame that the full recording and RA's recordings were not included in the box. She does recall that the walk-outs began during I Don't Believe You and continued into Baby, Let Me Follow You Down.


Image

Not surprisingly, she's changed a bit in the last 51 years, but you might still recognise her if you bumped into her...

#


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PostPosted: Fri May 26th, 2017, 23:35 GMT 

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Bravo Somebody Naked!

It has been a joy to read these. I intend to listen through the boxset with your reviews as a guide. Thanks for doing this :D


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PostPosted: Sat May 27th, 2017, 06:40 GMT 
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Yes, thank you SomebodyNaked and everybody else who contributed to this thread. A lot of effort has been put into this, but it definetly was worth it.
It was great to re-live this important era in Bob's life through your posts.
Thank you!


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PostPosted: Sat May 27th, 2017, 08:19 GMT 
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Thank you all for lending your eyes, ears and voices to all of this. Thank you, as ever, to ER for providing a forum.

And hats off to the sterling work of Wvalebe, who's actually synchronised existing film footage to the CDs and compiled a proper electric set in two parts:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TY5aanT ... e=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHeHTXbAOf0

See ya. I'm off on holiday (last-minute changed plans: I could actually have stuck to the time frame and posted RAH 2 today: sorry...) and maybe to listen to The Basement Tapes or something.


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PostPosted: Sun May 28th, 2017, 22:05 GMT 
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I have listened to the set 3 times now


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PostPosted: Mon May 29th, 2017, 00:53 GMT 

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somebody naked
thank you very much
you made listening to the 1966 live recordings very insightful
drew


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PostPosted: Thu June 15th, 2017, 21:19 GMT 
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Some photos I took of a couple of these venues in June 2015:

Odeon Birmingham:

Image

De Montfort Hall, Leicester:

Image
Image


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PostPosted: Thu June 15th, 2017, 22:02 GMT 
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I especially like the Birmingham Odeon picture. I think I can say with a certain degree of assurance, you've caught the spirit of the place.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 06:33 GMT 
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charlesdarwin wrote:
I especially like the Birmingham Odeon picture. I think I can say with a certain degree of assurance, you've caught the spirit of the place.


I didn't have the heart to go inside...


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 07:22 GMT 
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charlesdarwin wrote:
I especially like the Birmingham Odeon picture. I think I can say with a certain degree of assurance, you've caught the spirit of the place.


Indeed, Brum is a grim cove to be washed up in.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 12:38 GMT 
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I finally got my hands on this box!
The idea is to listen to it in order, as it appears in the box, so leaving the audience recordings for last, but I already cheated and heard the Sheffield acoustic set. Other than that, only heard a couple shows so far and I am indeed blown away by the heavenly music produced by these fine gentlemen.
And I know that I will at some point jump to the 2 London shows. The reviews of both made me drool like a rabid dog


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PostPosted: Sat June 17th, 2017, 07:25 GMT 
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wormington wrote:
I finally got my hands on this box!
The idea is to listen to it in order, as it appears in the box, so leaving the audience recordings for last, but I already cheated and heard the Sheffield acoustic set. Other than that, only heard a couple shows so far and I am indeed blown away by the heavenly music produced by these fine gentlemen.
And I know that I will at some point jump to the 2 London shows. The reviews of both made me drool like a rabid dog


I'd recommend listening to it chronologically, in show order, at some point. It would take someone more disciplined than I to stick to an order on the first listen; although I know someone who did. I say just dive in and listen to what you want; and then, one day go through it chronolgically. There's a story in there.


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PostPosted: Sat June 17th, 2017, 08:04 GMT 
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Revisited London 1 the other day. Still recovering.


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PostPosted: Mon June 26th, 2017, 08:26 GMT 
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Heard this weekend the 2 RAH shows. They are truly something. The 1st one is of course gorgeous, but I´m glad we have the 2nd one too, a truly fascinating train wreck of a show.

The song that is currently stuck on my mind is One too many mornings. The electric arrangement to this tune is one of the most profoundly beautiful and hunting things I´ve ever heard.

I believe this box set contains the most beautiful and inspired rock ´n´roll ever recorded by anyone.


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PostPosted: Tue July 18th, 2017, 12:39 GMT 
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Somebody Naked wrote:
I've just spent quite a bit of time trying to pick out the Edinburgh footage from the Newcastle footage. It's fiendishly well edited together and quite confusing, but I think I've reached some conclusions.

Two concerts, 24 hours apart. Similar-looking stages and similar wardrobe choices. But there are some clear differences and pointers.

The key remark is by Richard Alderson, in NDH, backstage talking to Dylan and The Hawks about the reviews. "From what town?" asks Dylan. "From the last town" says Alderson; "Edinborrow". Right: that means that the entire sequence of backstage clips, that pop up in various places - this clip, the "don't worry, Mickey, I'll protect you" remark, Robbie Robertson examining his fingernails, Dylan asking Alderson how it's going to sound tonight - are all from Newcastle on May 21st; probably in the interval, I'd say.

The performance of Like A Rolling Stone in NDH - and included as an extra - is also from Newcastle.

BUT. This is where it gets clever. The performance is mainly shot from two different concerts. Newcastle is where we see Dylan sweaty, pale, twitchy, making exaggerated movements with his mouth, dressed all in black and in front of a red curtain. He's shot from very close but not actually on the stage.

Edinburgh, on the other hand - I'm now convinced - is the stuff where Pennebaker is actually on stage with them (the opening of One Too Many Mornings NDH extra, the pan across Garth Hudson's keyboard, the shots of the audience, etc). This is certain from the Ballad Of A Thin Man sequence in NDH: which, usefully, contains a single pan shot of Dylan sitting at the piano, helped by Richard Manuel (vacating the stool for him). We can see the colour of the curtain, which is kind of a beige/orange colour. I'd always assumed that this difference was just down to lighting; ditto Dylan's clothes. But no. In Edinburgh he's wearing a dark blue matching velvet suit and shirt, which in Newcastle is black. Robbie Robertson seems to have dug out his purple shirt for both nights; again, which had me confused for a while.

This also backs up the theory - can't remember where I read it - that Dylan allowed Pennebaker to get up close with his cameras for one night (Edinburgh) and then regretted it by the next night (Newcastle).

Everyone still with me? Here are two screenshots, both from the NDH Like A Rolling Stone, that appear almost immediately consecutively.

Edinburgh, May 20th:

Image

Newcastle, May 21st:

Image


In a labour of love that strikes me as simply off the scale, Wvalebe has somehow managed to match up the existing 9 or so minutes of Edinburgh footage with the CD. Astonishing.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwQ2iC ... ZsZTQ/view


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PostPosted: Tue July 18th, 2017, 13:03 GMT 
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Cool.

I´m still working my way through this set. I left the audience tapes on the side, as they are unlistenable to me. other than this I´ve done the last 3 shows and half of the rest of the tour. Plus of course Manchester which I know by heart


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PostPosted: Tue July 18th, 2017, 18:05 GMT 
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Somebody Naked wrote:
Somebody Naked wrote:
I've just spent quite a bit of time trying to pick out the Edinburgh footage from the Newcastle footage. It's fiendishly well edited together and quite confusing, but I think I've reached some conclusions.

Two concerts, 24 hours apart. Similar-looking stages and similar wardrobe choices. But there are some clear differences and pointers.

The key remark is by Richard Alderson, in NDH, backstage talking to Dylan and The Hawks about the reviews. "From what town?" asks Dylan. "From the last town" says Alderson; "Edinborrow". Right: that means that the entire sequence of backstage clips, that pop up in various places - this clip, the "don't worry, Mickey, I'll protect you" remark, Robbie Robertson examining his fingernails, Dylan asking Alderson how it's going to sound tonight - are all from Newcastle on May 21st; probably in the interval, I'd say.

The performance of Like A Rolling Stone in NDH - and included as an extra - is also from Newcastle.

BUT. This is where it gets clever. The performance is mainly shot from two different concerts. Newcastle is where we see Dylan sweaty, pale, twitchy, making exaggerated movements with his mouth, dressed all in black and in front of a red curtain. He's shot from very close but not actually on the stage.

Edinburgh, on the other hand - I'm now convinced - is the stuff where Pennebaker is actually on stage with them (the opening of One Too Many Mornings NDH extra, the pan across Garth Hudson's keyboard, the shots of the audience, etc). This is certain from the Ballad Of A Thin Man sequence in NDH: which, usefully, contains a single pan shot of Dylan sitting at the piano, helped by Richard Manuel (vacating the stool for him). We can see the colour of the curtain, which is kind of a beige/orange colour. I'd always assumed that this difference was just down to lighting; ditto Dylan's clothes. But no. In Edinburgh he's wearing a dark blue matching velvet suit and shirt, which in Newcastle is black. Robbie Robertson seems to have dug out his purple shirt for both nights; again, which had me confused for a while.

This also backs up the theory - can't remember where I read it - that Dylan allowed Pennebaker to get up close with his cameras for one night (Edinburgh) and then regretted it by the next night (Newcastle).

Everyone still with me? Here are two screenshots, both from the NDH Like A Rolling Stone, that appear almost immediately consecutively.

Edinburgh, May 20th:

Image

Newcastle, May 21st:

Image


In a labour of love that strikes me as simply off the scale, Wvalebe has somehow managed to match up the existing 9 or so minutes of Edinburgh footage with the CD. Astonishing.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwQ2iC ... ZsZTQ/view



Terrific stuff!

And to think there is 30 hours of this kind of footage languishing in Tulsa... it's heartbreaking.

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PostPosted: Sat August 5th, 2017, 20:45 GMT 
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Just a random comment here. I have known only the Manchester gig before I bought this box, and I am always disappointed with the beggining of the electric set of any other gig (after having heard almost all of them).
In Manchester Tell me momma starts like a punch in the gut, with all the instruments on full power. No other one so far does the same. they start weaker, there´s always something missing, some instrument not right on the mix. Always leaves me a bit meh :|


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PostPosted: Sat August 5th, 2017, 21:56 GMT 

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wormington wrote:
Just a random comment here. I have known only the Manchester gig before I bought this box, and I am always disappointed with the beggining of the electric set of any other gig (after having heard almost all of them).
In Manchester Tell me momma starts like a punch in the gut, with all the instruments on full power. No other one so far does the same. they start weaker, there´s always something missing, some instrument not right on the mix. Always leaves me a bit meh :|
I'm glad you said that. Makes me feel better about my decision not to buy The Big Box.


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PostPosted: Sun August 6th, 2017, 05:44 GMT 
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mjmooney wrote:
wormington wrote:
Just a random comment here. I have known only the Manchester gig before I bought this box, and I am always disappointed with the beggining of the electric set of any other gig (after having heard almost all of them).
In Manchester Tell me momma starts like a punch in the gut, with all the instruments on full power. No other one so far does the same. they start weaker, there´s always something missing, some instrument not right on the mix. Always leaves me a bit meh :|
I'm glad you said that. Makes me feel better about my decision not to buy The Big Box.

No, Mr. Mooney. You NEED this box. You do. Oh how you need it.
This box is one of the best releases of the millenium


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PostPosted: Sun August 6th, 2017, 08:03 GMT 
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wormington wrote:
Just a random comment here. I have known only the Manchester gig before I bought this box, and I am always disappointed with the beggining of the electric set of any other gig (after having heard almost all of them).
In Manchester Tell me momma starts like a punch in the gut, with all the instruments on full power. No other one so far does the same. they start weaker, there´s always something missing, some instrument not right on the mix. Always leaves me a bit meh :|


I know what you mean. I felt this way for a while. I now think that Belfast comes close; and RAH 1 is definitely in that class.


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PostPosted: Sun August 6th, 2017, 11:01 GMT 
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Joined: Sat March 14th, 2015, 11:07 GMT
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Somebody Naked wrote:
wormington wrote:
Just a random comment here. I have known only the Manchester gig before I bought this box, and I am always disappointed with the beggining of the electric set of any other gig (after having heard almost all of them).
In Manchester Tell me momma starts like a punch in the gut, with all the instruments on full power. No other one so far does the same. they start weaker, there´s always something missing, some instrument not right on the mix. Always leaves me a bit meh :|


I know what you mean. I felt this way for a while. I now think that Belfast comes close; and RAH 1 is definitely in that class.


I feel this way about the beginning of "Baby, Let Me Follow You Down" from Manchester. That intro is just sublime and everything comes together in a way that it doesn't during the other performances I've heard. Also, "One Too Many Mornings" from Manchester is unrivaled in my opinion, as are some of the acoustic performances. RAH1 is as brilliant as Manchester, but in a different way.


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