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PostPosted: Fri July 10th, 2015, 18:44 GMT 
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^^^ Yeah, and the first question McCartney would get:

"Where's Bob?" :P


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PostPosted: Fri July 10th, 2015, 19:02 GMT 
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Paul would only show if Bob wasn't there.


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PostPosted: Sat July 11th, 2015, 16:43 GMT 

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Neither one of them would show up.


panther wrote:
ApocalypseKurtz wrote:
Who could have guessed a 4-hour Avant-garde film by a musician would have flopped?

I've got an idea for a highly successful marathon late-night showing at the theater -- Renaldo & Clara followed by Give My Regards to Broadstreet.

Dylan and McCartney will be present to answer audience questions afterwards.


It has nothing to do with Street Legal, but ...
That's a double-feature I'd like to see. Providing the stars stayed home.

Renaldo & Clara is an egocentric film. I say that in a positive way. It would play well at special events -- festivals, conventions, retrospectives, where people have a special interest. But it is not a film that the general public would respond to, not even in 1978 when movie-goers were more curious and accepting of different and experimental films. Dylan and his distributor understood that Renaldo & Clara had a limited audience, but they also had faith that "art films" need time to find that audience. When they four-walled theater screens for two weeks in February 1978, their faith in the film was not rewarded. But home video was always the medium in which fans could discover the film. It was a mistake not to release it at the dawn of the VHS industry some thirty years ago.

I think Dylan & Company should press the film to blu-ray and release it exclusively through his website, thereby avoiding the monetary drain of a third-party distributor and enabling the financial return to go straight into Dylan's pocket. Some introductory and annotated material should be added.

Alice Cooper and Neil Young made some personal films that weren't commercial successes, either, as I recall.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 11:46 GMT 
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Street-Legal turned 39 yesterday (well, by its release date anyway) and its like no one noticed.

Listening to Sweet, Sweet Charlotte right now and enjoying the live performances of the album. I recommend the album and the live shows as penance for those who forgot or were to busy yesterday to appreciate the moment.

And I'll go on record to rate the album like a fine wine... getting better with age.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 11:51 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
Street-Legal turned 39 yesterday (well, by its release date anyway) and its like no one noticed.

Listening to Sweet, Sweet Charlotte right now and enjoying the live performances of the album. I recommend the album and the live shows as penance for those who forgot or were to busy yesterday to appreciate the moment.

And I'll go on record to rate the album like a fine wine... getting better with age.


Thank you for minding the hyphen, and I'm glad you appreciate the album.

It is rather spiffing, in a bug-eyed, sweating, paranoid way.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 11:58 GMT 
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Rate Street Legal.....

Changing Of The Guards is a great song. I'd give it an 8.

The rest,
I don't care about. :D


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 12:07 GMT 
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Jim B. wrote:
Rate Street Legal.....

Changing Of The Guards is a great song. I'd give it an 8.

The rest,
I don't care about. :D


MIND THE HYPHEN!!!!!


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 12:12 GMT 
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Jim B. wrote:
Rate Street Legal.....

Changing Of The Guards is a great song. I'd give it an 8.

The rest,
I don't care about. :D

I like the entire album but each to his/her own... And your thoughts on Senor (Tales of Yankee Power)?

This album is the perfect transition to the gospel trilogy and I believe it was Dylan's "announcement" of what is to come.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 12:45 GMT 
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This album contains two masterwork bookends, with some good songs and a couple clunkers in between.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 13:26 GMT 

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Street-Legal where Bob attempts mid-seventies pop. Where to pitch songs was one interesting facet. Senor seemed pitched too low, which made the cowboy vocal sound a trifle ridiculous. Nice vague lyrics reminiscent of One More Cup of Coffee, it's obvious model. No Time to Think was pitched too high although I liked the meter and the arrangement of the chorus. It also includes a dozen good lines describing the poisonous effect of heedless pleasure, at least its effect on introverts and seekers.

Where Are You Tonight might be pitched where the singer is comfortable but the vocal is grating in parts and the "Journey Through Dark Heat" explanatory title seems goofy. What dark heat is this? The long haired stripper? But maybe I haven't had the dark heat experience. The folk singer wielding my "pistol babe" in Stop Crying always made me laugh but perhaps I hadn't fully bought the fiction. Was her love in vain? While I can appreciate the need for solitude the singer seems to be rather kingly in a rock star kind of way. I do like "you won't hear me complain" in the midst of his complaints.

True Love has tendencies, which surprised me. It also had that fine Mexico-to-Tibet line. Us boys, you got to have a mother for me. Changing of the Guards had dramatic sweep with its desperate men and women in the marketplace and might be regarded as Tender is the Night put to song, especially when somebody else lifts her veil. Jupiter and Apollo, though? We Better Talk This Over had the one hand clapping which was the object of some snark around release time and it also had the out-of-tune guitars and the Lindsey B riff so I dismissed it. Now it's a big favorite. What song better conveys I don't think you're quite what I thought you were? The real Seeing the Real You but with some inkling that the Real You might feel the same way.

And finally, New Pony, which wasn't attempting Charley Patton because it's part self-parody and otherwise the purest carnality ole Bob ever put to record. It also has the immortal "that god you're praying to gonna give ya back what you been wishin' on someone else" line.

In late 1970's LA everybody was partying too hard to finish a record so it got mixed 20 years later.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 13:49 GMT 

Joined: Wed May 31st, 2017, 00:56 GMT
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Untrodden Path wrote:
Street-Legal turned 39 yesterday (well, by its release date anyway) and its like no one noticed.

Listening to Sweet, Sweet Charlotte right now and enjoying the live performances of the album. I recommend the album and the live shows as penance for those who forgot or were to busy yesterday to appreciate the moment.

And I'll go on record to rate the album like a fine wine... getting better with age.


That's funny, I was listening to it yesterday after hearing it was turning 39 and felt the response was muted too. When I first heard it I thought it was a very good record , even if you were to just listen to Changing of the Guards, Senor and Where are You Tonight (which are as good as anything Dylan's ever written). But the album as a whole is still a fun listen, maybe for the 40th birthday there will be more buzz.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 18:09 GMT 

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Just for Senor alone the album is worthy of being in existence... I really like the studio take of Senor especially the part that is about tales of yankee power... whichever part that is??? I'm still trying to decipher just what the song is about? But it surely sounds bloody good.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 18:57 GMT 
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Street-Legal is fantastic. It goes by like a drug induced fever dream. It has a hot sound to it that makes it sound desperate. I agree with Kuddukan that the bookends are definitely the best, but what's between them ain't too bad either


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 19:09 GMT 
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The album capturing the moment Bob Dylan was transitioning out of being Bob Dylan into being Bob Dylan.


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PostPosted: Fri June 16th, 2017, 19:45 GMT 

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Are there many outtakes circulating from Street Legal? I have 'Stop Now' but that's all.

Really underrated record, let down slightly by a couple of lyrical missteps. 8/10


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PostPosted: Sat June 17th, 2017, 08:53 GMT 

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Street-Legal is best when you are madly in love.


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PostPosted: Sat June 17th, 2017, 09:11 GMT 
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I'm more than OK with Street Legal, I like most of the songs - especially New Pony!


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PostPosted: Sat June 17th, 2017, 09:31 GMT 
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twistedpin wrote:
Street-Legal is best when you are madly in love.

Yes, spot on, but it has to be unrequited love. Street-Legal and love sickness is a potent mix, perhaps more so than Blood on the Tracks, especially when you've reached the stage of bitterness.

I love Street-Legal like I love Death of a Ladies' Man.


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PostPosted: Sat June 17th, 2017, 10:27 GMT 
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I remember another contributor once saying that Blood on the Tracks wasn't the break-up album, Street-Legal was the break-up album. If there is such a thing as a break-up album, chronologically he was right. There's an underlying desperation to the imagery and a frantic, narcotic fueled velocity to the delivery of some of the songs that hasn't been present in his studio work since the mid 60s.

On Street-Legal Dylan's interest in form comes to the fore. His fascination for rhyme and wordplay are given free rein. I've said before that Dylan's intoxication by the possibilities of rhyme is like Shakespeare's addiction to quibbles (playing on words), they're both happy to follow where ever the compulsion leads them and if the larger work that contains it ultimately loses out they shrug and think it's well lost. Fortunately, given how good both of them are at what they do it isn't often that the larger work suffers - and personally, if it does I tend to shrug along with them and think, "So what, the rhyme's so brilliant and unexpected. The punning is so superbly funny, sly and dirty, it's worth it."

I don't really care what Changing of the Guards means, and anyway there can be no definitive meaning, any meaning could only be provisional and subject to change. I have a vision of a C15th/C16th allegorical painting where something enigmatic yet fraught with significance is happening in the foreground and in the middle distance there's a forest on fire with lots of animals running out of it, this always flashes into my mind when we come to the "Eden is burning" line.


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PostPosted: Sat June 17th, 2017, 11:07 GMT 
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Lily Rose wrote:
I wrote this back in 2011.... but still true.... as much as any album SL needs to be looked at as a whole together.... Although I will say that Changing of the Guards could stand alone any time....
Yep listen to it often.... yep still love it.... and did from the first time I heard it... but can't rate it because I think of it as a whole.....

Lily Rose wrote:
As to Street-Legal..... I like it because I think it is more a story of a relationship than even Blood on the Tracks.........
There are parts that I am not sure how it fits but for the most part it goes........
Changing of the Guards.....finds the woman..........
New Pony... starts the relationship..........
No Time to Think...moving too fast (as relationships always do)......
Baby Stop Crying.........Lost her, got her back....
Is Your Love in Vain........ Well, you were gone so don't get mad for what I was doing while you were away.......
Senor........Hey stranger........I am lost help me......
True Love Tends to Forget........Are we gonna work this out or not..........
We Better Talk this Over.......I give up, let's call it quits.......
Where are You Tonight...... That relationship is over, now you remember your real true lost love from long ago..........

I always love it when you catch him hanging his laundry out on the line for all to see....
Oh wait, what was I thinking.... Dylan does not write autobiographical songs :P


.... and yes, I do think that he hangs his laundry (life) out on the line all the time in his music...


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PostPosted: Sat June 17th, 2017, 13:29 GMT 

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When I first listened to the album I didn´t like it much.

But on the third or fourth time ( around ) something opened for me and I started to love the album, especially Senor.

I knew it was the follow up from Desire and I expected an album in the same way but the album before Desire, Bott, was something different so I ust let it flow and I tell you what: Street legal is in my top ten albums from His Bobness.

:D


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PostPosted: Sun June 18th, 2017, 00:38 GMT 
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charlesdarwin wrote:
I remember another contributor once saying that Blood on the Tracks wasn't the break-up album, Street-Legal was the break-up album. If there is such a thing as a break-up album, chronologically he was right. There's an underlying desperation to the imagery and a frantic, narcotic fueled velocity to the delivery of some of the songs that hasn't been present in his studio work since the mid 60s.

On Street-Legal Dylan's interest in form comes to the fore. His fascination for rhyme and wordplay are given free rein. I've said before that Dylan's intoxication by the possibilities of rhyme is like Shakespeare's addiction to quibbles (playing on words), they're both happy to follow where ever the compulsion leads them and if the larger work that contains it ultimately loses out they shrug and think it's well lost. Fortunately, given how good both of them are at what they do it isn't often that the larger work suffers - and personally, if it does I tend to shrug along with them and think, "So what, the rhyme's so brilliant and unexpected. The punning is so superbly funny, sly and dirty, it's worth it."

I don't really care what Changing of the Guards means, and anyway there can be no definitive meaning, any meaning could only be provisional and subject to change. I have a vision of a C15th/C16th allegorical painting where something enigmatic yet fraught with significance is happening in the foreground and in the middle distance there's a forest on fire with lots of animals running out of it, this always flashes into my mind when we come to the "Eden is burning" line.


Great post. I love this site.


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PostPosted: Sun June 18th, 2017, 01:24 GMT 
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Where are you Tonight is heartbreaking. god have I been there. I have always found Street-Legal to be as under-rated as it is over-rated.

Charles' post is wonderful and echoes how I feel about a lot of it.

I always got a kick out of Eddie's thoughts on Changing of the Guards.

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=32311&p=491169&hilit=Eddie+changing+of+the+guards#p491169

Hope you're well, Eddie


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PostPosted: Sun June 18th, 2017, 09:13 GMT 
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'For those precious few minutes I'm no longer a slightly paunchy middle-aged railwayman...'

"all the railroad men
Just drink up your blood like wine"!

As you say, best wishes to Eddie.


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PostPosted: Sun June 18th, 2017, 17:16 GMT 

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Untrodden Path wrote:
Street-Legal turned 39 yesterday (well, by its release date anyway) and its like no one noticed.


Funny, I listened to Street-Legal (and Infidels) for the first time in ages last thursday,
and really had an old-fashioned Dylan/music bonding moment.

While there are elements to SL that I still don't fully like, it has some fascinating songs.

Some of the lyrics read really well on paper, in a way that stands apart from the music.
Just really clever rhymes, wordsmith stuff.


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