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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 09:30 GMT 

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Indeed, in every way shape or form Slow Train in the complete antithesis of S-L--not a bad thing (that's what makes Bob so fascinating), but I know which one I prefer!


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 09:57 GMT 
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Changing Of The Guards - 10
New Pony - 6
No Time To Think - 10
Baby Stop Crying - 7
Is Your Love In Vain? - 7
Senor - 6
True Love Tends To Forget - 5
We Better Talk This Over - 5
Where Are You Tonight? - 10

The whole album: 9
(its average would be less than 8, but an album with three 10s deserves one of the top notches in my bokk)
(just a little bit below the golden trilogy plus Blood-Desire)


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 10:11 GMT 
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The album received pretty good treatment "live" during his '78 tour but it deserves better. These songs deserve to be art of the NET set lists with his current band where new life is added to these tunes. Aside from Senor (Tales of Yankee Power) and a one-off performance of We Better Talk This Over (March 10, 2000 - Anaheim) none of these songs made it past the '78 tour.

Refusing or failing to play the songs of Street-Legal during the Never Ending Tour, does that not border on a crime against humanity?


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 10:18 GMT 
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Based on the one Better Talk This Over, that certainly could have been a NET standard, which is doubtless true of a number of the albums' songs.

If wonder if he had played something else consistently and never touched Señor if that song would be a beloved oldie and Señor largely forgotten. Live performances can have that effect--just look at Lenny Bruce.


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 10:33 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
The album received pretty good treatment "live" during his '78 tour but it deserves better. These songs deserve to be art of the NET set lists with his current band where new life is added to these tunes. Aside from Senor (Tales of Yankee Power) and a one-off performance of We Better Talk This Over (March 10, 2000 - Anaheim) none of these songs made it past the '78 tour.

Refusing or failing to play the songs of Street-Legal during the Never Ending Tour, does that not border on a crime against humanity?



no, no, no, thanks.

i don't want to know how vitriolic songs like Where Are You Tonight and/or Changing Of The Guards might be mauled and mashed up by this present band....


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 13:25 GMT 
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I think the Springsteen comparisons are not correct for Street-Legal. Springsteen released 'Darkness' in 1978 which was a hard rocking and somewhat dark record in contrast with his earlier stuff ... jumping back to 1975 he released 'Born to Run' but Bob didn't "copy" that in 1976 so why start in 1978? And further, why would Bob feel a need to copy Springsteen at all in 1978? He had just released 2 hugely successful albums, 'Blood' and 'Desire'.

I think a better case can be made for 1985. Coming on the heels of the so-so Infidels, following his poorly received gospel trilogy, Bob wants to update his sound and so he thinks he can emulate Springsteen's tremendously successful 'Born in the USA' (1984). So he has his producer go for that sound on Empire Burlesque, but he overdoes it with the synths.


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 13:35 GMT 
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ApocalypseKurtz wrote:
He had just released 2 hugely successful albums, 'Blood' and 'Desire'.


He hadn't 'just released 2 hugely successful albums'. His last album Hard Rain had been in 1976 which managed to get to #17 in the US, and some 18 months after that his movie flopped badly at considerable cost to Dylan.

Add the expensive divorce, and you have a Bob Dylan in early 1978 whose next venture had to make money. Hence the world tour and the greatest hits show.


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 14:01 GMT 
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That is as true and as significant to explaining the events of 78 as anything else written here. There's no way a successful live album, TV special and feature film wouldn't have changed the kind of album he recorded.
He was back in a similar mindset to 1965-66 with his back to the wall. If he had had any encouragement from positive reviews for R & C, he might have abandoned songwriting completely. Just like could have happened prior to writing LARS


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 14:01 GMT 

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All of these songs are second rate to me. I occasionally listen to Changing of the Guards and Senor but they're not exactly great songs. Bob went way overboard with some of these...No Time to Think, Baby Stop Crying, Where Are You Tonight?...I'm just not a fan of this album.


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 14:13 GMT 
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Who could have guessed a 4-hour Avant-garde film by a musician would have flopped?


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 15:02 GMT 
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I wrote this back in 2011.... but still true.... as much as any album SL needs to be looked at as a whole together.... Although I will say that Changing of the Guards could stand alone any time....
Yep listen to it often.... yep still love it.... and did from the first time I heard it... but can't rate it because I think of it as a whole.....

Lily Rose wrote:
As to Street-Legal..... I like it because I think it is more a story of a relationship than even Blood on the Tracks.........
There are parts that I am not sure how it fits but for the most part it goes........
Changing of the Guards.....finds the woman..........
New Pony... starts the relationship..........
No Time to Think...moving too fast (as relationships always do)......
Baby Stop Crying.........Lost her, got her back....
Is Your Love in Vain........ Well, you were gone so don't get mad for what I was doing while you were away.......
Senor........Hey stranger........I am lost help me......
True Love Tends to Forget........Are we gonna work this out or not..........
We Better Talk this Over.......I give up, let's call it quits.......
Where are You Tonight...... That relationship is over, now you remember your real true lost love from long ago..........

I always love it when you catch him hanging his laundry out on the line for all to see....
Oh wait, what was I thinking.... Dylan does not write autobiographical songs :P


.... and yes, I do think that he hangs his laundry (life) out on the line all the time in his music...


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 15:23 GMT 
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I agree, and Street-Legal may be more autobiographical than Blood on the Tracks.


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 16:17 GMT 
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For me, Planet Waves is Dylan's most autobiographical album... both Planet Waves and Street Legal are stunningly emotive albums.

If William Blake, Shelley or Coleridge had written song lyrics... these two albums are what they would have penned.

Poetry of love, poetry of deed... poetry of torn souls. Lovelorn, forlorn and lost.

Emotionally charged desire, desperation, despair and adject fear of future failures... love sure does hurt.


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 17:06 GMT 
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thickboy wrote:
For me, Planet Waves is Dylan's most autobiographical album... both Planet Waves and Street Legal are stunningly emotive albums.

If William Blake, Shelley or Coleridge had written song lyrics... these two albums are what they would have penned.

Poetry of love, poetry of deed... poetry of torn souls. Lovelorn, forlorn and lost.

Emotionally charged desire, desperation, despair and adject fear of future failures... love sure does hurt.


Truer words were never so adjectly penned, per se.


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 18:36 GMT 
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thickboy wrote:
For me, Planet Waves is Dylan's most autobiographical album... .

considering that Planet Waves has both Dirge and the Wedding Song included on the same album, I think we can assume his life was pretty confusing at the time.... :P

Hi, thickboy :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 18:47 GMT 

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"Changing of the Guard" is a story narrative that doesn't seem personal unless one looks for metaphors. Is the song personal in the sense of relating of to his life at the moment?


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 19:09 GMT 
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Lily Rose wrote:
thickboy wrote:
For me, Planet Waves is Dylan's most autobiographical album... .

considering that Planet Waves has both Dirge and the Wedding Song included on the same album, I think we can assume his life was pretty confusing at the time.... :P

Hi, thickboy :wink:


Hi Lily Rose... loveliest flower of the West


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 20:21 GMT 

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Changing Of The Guards - 9 Great tune, coke fuelled visionary lyrics.
New Pony - 8 Unbreakable blues, very funny
No Time To Think - 5 Wordy & overlong, bit pretentious
Baby Stop Crying - 7.5 Always good
Is Your Love In Vain? - 6 Sexist but a great melody. Reminds me of 'Coming from the Heart'
Senor - 10 Classic, what can we say?
True Love Tends To Forget - 8 Love this song, Like Russian Roulette rhymes with Mexico to Tibet.
We Better Talk This Over - 7 Slightly forgettable
Where Are You Tonight? - 10 Devastating song, never gets old, EVER!!!!


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 20:30 GMT 
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And in my opinion, the original '78 mix, which they re-released recently on the Complete set, is better than the remix they did in the late 90s....


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 20:59 GMT 
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i never understood why people claim this record would sound bad. my vinyl copy (bought the day it came out in '78) has a very rich and dense sound.

overall, it's a nice little record.

Changing Of The Guards - 6/10
New Pony - 2/10
No Time To Think - 1/10
Baby Stop Crying - 4/10
Is Your Love In Vain? - 6/10
Senor - 7/10
True Love Tends To Forget - 4/10
We Better Talk This Over - 4/10
Where Are You Tonight? - 6/10


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 21:04 GMT 
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Hi sammy's_cat :)

Just saw your name and thought it was 8)


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PostPosted: Thu July 9th, 2015, 22:14 GMT 
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Richard--W wrote:
"Changing of the Guard" is a story narrative that doesn't seem personal unless one looks for metaphors. Is the song personal in the sense of relating of to his life at the moment?

Yes. Changing of the Guard is Bob's signal that with his next album there will a significant change in his life.

He told the world before it happened... but everybody thought it was just an interesting song.


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PostPosted: Fri July 10th, 2015, 02:02 GMT 
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Dylan's greatest and most cohesive album. 10/10. Like anything worthwhile it takes some work on the listener's part. All good things come to those who...Oh fu&k it (ala The Grand Budapest hotel).


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PostPosted: Fri July 10th, 2015, 13:41 GMT 
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ApocalypseKurtz wrote:
Who could have guessed a 4-hour Avant-garde film by a musician would have flopped?

I've got an idea for a highly successful marathon late-night showing at the theater -- Renaldo & Clara followed by Give My Regards to Broadstreet.

Dylan and McCartney will be present to answer audience questions afterwards.


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PostPosted: Fri July 10th, 2015, 17:29 GMT 
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^McCartney may actually show.

Bob?

I wouldn't count on it...


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