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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 19:24 GMT 
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There's a new Dylan print ad for Chrysler in the "Hollywood" issue of Vanity Fair. Two other similar Chrysler ads are also in this issue, one using a photograph of James Dean and one a photograph of Marilyn Monroe. The Dylan ad, a 2 page spread with a photograph of what appears to be 1965 Bob from the Newport Folk Festival, has the tagline: "There's no match for an ORIGINAL."


The ad is reminiscent of the famous 1968 Blackglama mink coat ad campaign, beautiful ads photographed by Richard Avedon. Each ad featured a famous performer wearing a black mink coat with the tagline "What becomes a Legend most?" The ads were conceived for the mink association in an attempt to reposition mink as an acceptable luxury item after a year that saw protests in which women wearing mink coats on NYC streets were splashed with paint by anti-fur activists.


The original 1968 Blackglama ads featured 5 women: Lauren Bacall, Melina Mercouri, Bette Davis, Judy Garland and Barbra Streisand.


Later Blackglama ads featured (among others): Marlene Dietrich, Lena Horne, Maria Callas, Leontyne Price, Joan Crawford, Brigitte Bardot, Rita Hayworth, Carol Burnett, Pearl Bailey, Diahann Carroll, Ethel Merman, Peggy Lee, Diana Ross, Raquel Welch, Lillian Hellman, Liv Ullman, Shirley Maclaine, Faye Dunaway, Lana Turner ("you fool - that is Lana Turner!" - Jack Vincennes), Maggie Smith, Myrna Loy, Natalie Wood, Julie Andrews, Sophia Loren, Elizabeth Taylor, Lucille Ball, Catherine Deneuve, Audrey Hepburn, Lainie Kazan, Bette Midler and Ann Margaret. (bonus points to those who recognize various Dylan 'lady friends,' paramours and crushes in that list......)


The Blackglama campaign, in its early years one of the most aesthetically beautiful ad campaigns of all time, was initially controversial for featuring African-American women like Horne, Price, Bailey, and Carroll as glamorous icons at a time when African Americans almost never appeared as models in advertising campaigns.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 19:34 GMT 
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Illustration...

Image


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 20:15 GMT 
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Whatever you wish to keep, you'd better grab it fast.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:13 GMT 
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Soylent Green Preservation Society wrote:
Illustration...

Image


That's it. I saw it last night when my VF arrived. I like it.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:20 GMT 
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If they make posters of it, keep me one. :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:24 GMT 
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If they do, I'll let you know.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:25 GMT 
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I like the photo, but overall I'm not too impressed. The typography is all over the place. Wth is going on with the fonts there :?


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:33 GMT 
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Soylent Green Preservation Society wrote:
I like the photo, but overall I'm not too impressed. The typography is all over the place. Wth is going on with the fonts there :?


I thought the same. They'd have spent a lot of time and money to design something that looks like a promotional card for a new espresso bar on your block.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:36 GMT 
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Ain't Talkin' wrote:
Soylent Green Preservation Society wrote:
I like the photo, but overall I'm not too impressed. The typography is all over the place. Wth is going on with the fonts there :?


I thought the same. They'd have spent a lot of time and money to design something that looks like an advertisement for a new espresso bar on your block.


Maybe they can tie it to a new Starbucks CD release. :P


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:41 GMT 
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re: the ad layout...... Again, that's all done by design - no pun intended. People (generally) read left to right. The word "Original" in red type ties to Bob, not necessarily the car. Then you move back over to the left and see the Chrysler logo. The other stuff is all incidental. The big stuff (and photo) is what was designed to grab people by the boo boo.

In fact, most people will see the visual image of Bob since it dominates the print and then look at the rest. If they don't get a reader within 5 seconds, they've failed. It's a 2 page spread. This ad does the trick.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:52 GMT 
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Ain't Talkin' wrote:
Soylent Green Preservation Society wrote:
I like the photo, but overall I'm not too impressed. The typography is all over the place. Wth is going on with the fonts there :?


I thought the same. They'd have spent a lot of time and money to design something that looks like a promotional card for a new espresso bar on your block.


It's weird, because while Chrysler doesn't have the best history of typography in their ads, they're also not the worst offender. I don't get why they didn't go with a classy Bodoni font for the "original" line. They've used that before - and Chronicles was set in Bodoni.


ETA: Boston, yeah, the layout of the ad is alright. It's the finer points that are weirdly grating, like the choice of typeface. Chrysler seems to have a history of "classy" print ads (well, I mean, serif fonts...) and this one looks kinda cheap.


Last edited by Soylent Green Preservation Society on Thu February 13th, 2014, 22:00 GMT, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 21:53 GMT 
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BostonAreaBobFan wrote:
re: the ad layout...... Again, that's all done by design - no pun intended. People (generally) read left to right. The word "Original" in red type ties to Bob, not necessarily the car. Then you move back over to the left and see the Chrysler logo. The other stuff is all incidental. The big stuff (and photo) is what was designed to grab people by the boo boo.

In fact, most people will see the visual image of Bob since it dominates the print and then look at the rest. If they don't get a reader within 5 seconds, they've failed. It's a 2 page spread. This ad does the trick.


I think they failed, because I first lingered on Bob a bit before I even looked at the other stuff. :) But, I know, Chrysler wasn't thinking of me looking at it on a Bob Dylan fan list.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 22:07 GMT 
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Soylent Green Preservation Society wrote:
Ain't Talkin' wrote:

I thought the same. They'd have spent a lot of time and money to design something that looks like a promotional card for a new espresso bar on your block.



It's weird, because while Chrysler doesn't have the best history of typography in their ads, they're also not the worst offender. I don't get why they didn't go with a classy Bodoni font for the "original" line. They've used that before - and Chronicles was set in Bodoni.




The actual ad in the magazine also doesn't have this level of resolution - it's much more pixilated. The similar Chrysler ads from the same campaign in this issue of Vanity Fair featuring photographs of James Dean and Marilyn Monroe are not impressive either.


There are some beautiful celebrity endorsement ads in this Vanity Fair: Lupita Nyong'o for MIU MIU, Kate Moss for Alexander McQueen and Catherine Deneuve, Sofia Coppola and Gisele Bundchen for Louis Vuitton. There's also a stunning gatefold faux documentary style ad of portraits of transgendered models photographed by Bruce Weber for BARNEYS NEW YORK. In this company, the Dylan Chrysler ad is boring and cheesy. Although given who the audience for Chrysler is, perhaps this was intentional?


Chrysler hired one of the most famous people in the world to star in their new ad campaign and for some reason, didn't come up with creative worthy of using Bob Dylan as the talent. How bizarre is this? It wouldn't have been that expense to find a better director for the Super Bowl ad or a better concept (and photo of Dylan) for the print ad. What was Chrysler thinking?


Here's an article about the Louis Vuitton ad campaign featured in Vanity Fair:


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/1 ... 72388.html


Last edited by the_revelator on Thu February 13th, 2014, 22:20 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 22:18 GMT 
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The Dylan/Chrysler ads are boring and cheesy period.

IMO, of course...not sure why I'm so hard on this particular ad campaign of Dylan's...but the boring and cheesy aspects might be why.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 22:23 GMT 
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smoke wrote:
The Dylan/Chrysler ads are boring and cheesy period.

IMO, of course...not sure why I'm so hard on this particular ad campaign of Dylan's...but the boring and cheesy aspects might be why.




Imagine if they had come up with a really interesting concept - or even just a beautiful photo of Dylan? The chessiness is disheartening. A great opportunity was lost here.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 22:51 GMT 
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Ain't Talkin' wrote:
BostonAreaBobFan wrote:
re: the ad layout...... Again, that's all done by design - no pun intended. People (generally) read left to right. The word "Original" in red type ties to Bob, not necessarily the car. Then you move back over to the left and see the Chrysler logo. The other stuff is all incidental. The big stuff (and photo) is what was designed to grab people by the boo boo.

In fact, most people will see the visual image of Bob since it dominates the print and then look at the rest. If they don't get a reader within 5 seconds, they've failed. It's a 2 page spread. This ad does the trick.


I think they failed, because I first lingered on Bob a bit before I even looked at the other stuff. :) But, I know, Chrysler wasn't thinking of me looking at it on a Bob Dylan fan list.


No, that's what the ad's designed to do - make you stop and look.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 22:54 GMT 
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the_revelator wrote:
smoke wrote:
The Dylan/Chrysler ads are boring and cheesy period.

IMO, of course...not sure why I'm so hard on this particular ad campaign of Dylan's...but the boring and cheesy aspects might be why.




Imagine if they had come up with a really interesting concept - or even just a beautiful photo of Dylan? The chessiness is disheartening. A great opportunity was lost here.


I don't think the ad's cheesy. You may not like it but it's not cheesy. And I LOVE the photo of Bob. It's a great, classic shot.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 22:59 GMT 
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BostonAreaBobFan wrote:

No, that's what the ad's designed to do - make you stop and look.


It's not (to me) visually arresting in any way, aside from that I'm from the perspective of a Dylan fan. Joe or Maria Non-Dylan-Fan may have a different kind of reaction.

Those huge, funky old microphones actually look incongruous in between the sleek Dylan and sleek Chrysler car. I'm surprised they weren't airbrushed out.


Last edited by Ain't Talkin' on Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:02 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:00 GMT 
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Did you see it in print or here in this thread?


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:03 GMT 
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BostonAreaBobFan wrote:
Did you see it in print or here in this thread?


In the thread.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:07 GMT 
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BostonAreaBobFan wrote:
the_revelator wrote:


Imagine if they had come up with a really interesting concept - or even just a beautiful photo of Dylan? The chessiness is disheartening. A great opportunity was lost here.


I don't think the ad's cheesy. You may not like it but it's not cheesy. And I LOVE the photo of Bob. It's a great, classic shot.



You may like it but it's cheesy and boring when compared to many other ads in this issue of Vanity Fair.

You have a copy of the magazine. There are obviously much better ads in there - many. Why? Not because Chrysler didn't have the $$$ for a v. good ad campaign. Not because Bob Dylan is inherently dullsville.

Bob Dylan = YOLO!

It's not the worst ad in the world - but if that photo wasn't of Bob Dylan, you wouldn't have paused to look at it. The ad is that boring and forgettable.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:08 GMT 
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@ Ain't talkin - I think that may be the difference but maybe it doesn't do anything for you.

Bob's appearance as a young man will definately get attention in print when a reader is flipping thru the pages. Most iconic celebrities get attention. I think the print ad is fine - it was Bob's appearance (literally) in the TV ad that was so off putting to me. There's where they missed the BIG opportunity, IMO, not in this piece.

@therev - I disagree with you. That's okay.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:22 GMT 
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The print ad is a dull, static, cluttered mess. As others have noted, the different fonts are confusing and unattractive. It's not a great photo in this context (why use this particular photo of him? It seems RANDOM) and I don't like how it's positioned. The composition with the mic stand being the diagonal is amateurish. What's all that junk under the tagline? "Blah Blah Blah" + 2 cheesy stock photos of the car & upholstery! + that boring Chrysler logo. What's with that stupid, weird-length white lanyard off to the left? What's that for? I love b&w but just making an ad black & white and using a b&w photo doesn't transcend how visually boring this ad is without more thought than this.

Dylan himself is interesting - that's presumably why they wanted to use him. They didn't come up with anything that wasn't just another ugly conventional car ad. You only looked at it because the photo is of Dylan.

Remember Apple's BIG BROTHER ad? You don't have to be this literal to make a good ad. There were probably a million interesting ways they could have used Bob Dylan. This isn't one of them. If the Super Bowl ad had been a really good ad, everyone would have seen that immediately and posted so. As it was, the fact that the ad wasn't very interesting is one of the reasons it was picked at and hated on hERe ad nauseam. Same with this. If this was a great ad, people would be able to see it right away. Instead, it's just an ad that people are interested in because the photo is of Dylan.

The JEEP ad with "Motherless Children" is a conventional car ad but much better than this. His iTunes ad and even the Victoria's Secret ad were much more interesting than this. This one is just bad. They made Bob Dylan boring. That's hard to do......


Last edited by the_revelator on Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:26 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:25 GMT 
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In the original post, the ad was compared to an aesthetically beautiful ad campaign. In what way is it reminiscent of those ads? I thought the comparison was inferring a visual similarity.


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PostPosted: Thu February 13th, 2014, 23:44 GMT 
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raging_glory wrote:
In the original post, the ad was compared to an aesthetically beautiful ad campaign. In what way is it reminiscent of those ads? I thought the comparison was inferring a visual similarity.




It's reminiscent in spirit and intention. Chrysler is trying to reposition this car as something that's both traditional and at the same time "all-new" - when in actuality, it's just one more boring American car. Nothing new here. The pitch is not that the car appears "all-new" - or that there's anything new about the engineering. It's that the idea of the car as part of a legend of American ingenuity and innovation is a new concept and using Dylan as an emblematic 'change agent' here is supposed to support the idea that - like Dylan - the car is both deeply traditional Americana and also representative of something unique and evolving, I.E. the evolving and unique culture of American ingenuity. The Blackglama ads were attempting to reposition a product that few people had a good opinion of in 1968 by classing it up (visually and conceptually) and introducing the idea of mythology to fur to supplant the political narrative in 1968 that fur was cruel and evil - a blight, as it were. American cars are not quite that unappealing but they are having a long road back from being viewed as an inferior product. It's also reminiscent of the Blackglama ads in the tagline - "There's no match for an ORIGINAL" and the Blackglama tagline "What becomes a Legend most?" - conflating a story about the qualities of the product with the mythic qualities people project onto the celebrity.


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