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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 14:02 GMT 
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Troubadour64 wrote:
6-9 + 11 might be my favorite 5 tracks . I had a bob Dylan dream last night... It was great I talked to him twice and he met my father...the new album is supposed to be very good from what I could tell...


Open door.
Go out.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 15:36 GMT 

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While I have said Dylan's self-titled first album is my favourite of all of his albums, in my opinion, his second album, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, is the best of all of his albums. One of the reasons for the quality of this album over the first album might be that the first album was churned out very quickly (having been recorded in a mere two days). Dylan was given a much longer time to record Freewheelin' with recording commencing on April 24, 1962 and Dylan recording off and on until the eighth and last recording session of the album taking place exactly one year later on April 24, 1963. Perhaps this is why Freewheelin' probably has more outtakes than just about any other album that Dylan recorded. Speaking of the outtakes, I really cannot recommend them enough. A strong argument could be made for the Freewheelin Outtakes being the absolutely best bootleg that Dylan has not officially released yet.

If I was going to recommend one specific outtake that you should listen to, I would recommend Dylan's redition of Big Joe William's "Baby, Please Don't Go" which was recorded on April 25, 1962, the second day of recording for the album. As I said in a different thread, the Freewheelin Outtakes version is not only Dylan’s best cover of this song but maybe the best song he did in ‘61/62 that is not on an officially released album. There is a crispness to his guitar and harmonica playing on this version of the song which demonstrates that in this time period, Dylan could really play. He also has a great blues-y vocal. This song showcases Dylan as the folk music performer rather than the songwriter he later became known for. All of that being said, "Baby, Please Don't Go" is just the tip of the iceberg. Highest possible recommendation for these outtakes!

The other thing I find interesting about this time period is that is appears that it was during the recording of this album that a power struggle developed between producer, John Hammond, and Dylan's manager, Albert Grossman. The result was that mid-way through, Hammond was replaced with Tom Wilson who went on to record the next three Dylan's albums until he was replaced by Bob Johnston early on during the recording of Highway 61 Revisited.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 15:40 GMT 
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Troubadour64 wrote:
6-9 + 11 might be my favorite 5 tracks .


Excuse me?!!
What about:
1."Blowin' in the Wind" :!:
2."Girl from the North Country" :!:
3."Masters of War"
:!:


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 15:53 GMT 
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John B. Stetson wrote:
He went to Crossroads, of course, Rev! :D






:shock:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvSN3dnmBw0


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 15:57 GMT 
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doomedtoloveyou wrote:
Troubadour64 wrote:
6-9 + 11 might be my favorite 5 tracks .


Excuse me?!!

What about:
1."Blowin' in the Wind" :!: overplayed, lacks power from over exposure, for me.
2."Girl from the North Country" :!: i prefer the version that has the lyrics to Boots of spanish leather
3."Masters of War" :!: i have no argument against this. but it does get repetitive for me after awhile, unlike hard rain and hattie carroll. i guess i like his 'songs' better than his 'finger pointing' songs....

picking up the vinyl edition this afternoon. it's possible my feelings will change afterwards...


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:00 GMT 
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At the time it was written, there was nothing out there like "Masters of War." It doesn't seem so novel after 50 years of listening, but it was in 1963.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:05 GMT 
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it's still powerful - and has been powerful for me --- it's just been played so much. at the right moment (or during the right live rendition) it still has it's power, and the last verse never fails for me either.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:11 GMT 
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the_revelator wrote:
At the time it was written, there was nothing out there like "Masters of War." It doesn't seem so novel after 50 years of listening, but it was in 1963.


Nothing like Hard Rain neither. The over-exposure does make it hard to fully appreciate this album for me. I've heard dozens of versions of some of these...ok, probably hundreds...

When I gave it a spin last night the highlight for me was Down The Highway, what a cool little gem. As JRJ mentioned, there's a lot of great guitar on this album and in this time frame, some of the best of his career, I reckon.


Last edited by smoke on Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:12 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:11 GMT 
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'Dont Think Twice' is as perfect as song as has ever been written and sung.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:14 GMT 
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True, and unlike some others here this version is the best one--I'm sure by as close to unanimous agreement as one could find about anything in Dylan's career. A fine example of the sort of guitar playing he soon stopped bothering with as well.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:15 GMT 
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Bennyboy wrote:
'Dont Think Twice' is as perfect as song as has ever been written and sung.


agreed.

here's someone else who thinks so:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxcy3v1rAUs


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:34 GMT 
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Agree. "Don't Think Twice" is basically the perfect Dylan song. In terms of power in simplicity, it may be his best song.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 16:36 GMT 
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Bennyboy wrote:
'Dont Think Twice' is as perfect as song as has ever been written and sung.



Yes


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 19:21 GMT 
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The more I listen to Talkin' WWIII Blues, the more I like it. Lots of brilliant one-liners & really funny.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 19:50 GMT 
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Holy Masters of War Mono :!:

guitar work on down the highway is as good as anything he's done...

great, fun nondissonant harp in Bob Dylan's Blues.


Last edited by Troubadour64 on Fri June 1st, 2012, 19:57 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 19:57 GMT 
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the_revelator wrote:
The leap in his songwriting in that one year between "Bob Dylan" and "Freewheelin'" is inexplicable, like jumping the Grand Canyon. How did he do it? Nobody knows.


Yeah, I don't think I've ever seen where he's said he came to New York knowing he was gonna write his own material. Right?

And BAM!!! This.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 19:58 GMT 
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I guess he also had more time and access to all kinds of music and literature. The change of scenery must have been inspiring as well.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:07 GMT 
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Probably won't be able to comment on it today, but I'll listen to it tonight and get back to you guys within a few days at least. The Early Folk years, haven't been revisited by me in quite some time, this is a real treat.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:09 GMT 
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time stands still during don't think twice. dylan's expansive, intimate universe envelopes.

bob dylan's dream is one of those where each verse kicks it up a notch, ever so slightly, so by the end it's moving full speed ahead ...

just fantastic guitar playing and singing in Oxford Town. definitely belongs on any "So, you think Dylan Can't Sing?!" compilation.

the meter's so precise in WWIII blues, it could be a rap song :!:

oh what's that in Corrina, Corrina ? drums, and a bass?

Bass – Leonard Gaskin
Drums – Herb Lovelle*
Guitar – Bruce Langhorne, Howie Collins*
Piano – Dick Wellstood


Last edited by Troubadour64 on Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:31 GMT, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:20 GMT 
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it's easy to understand why people thought of him as a messiah or whatever, serious visionary stuff.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:22 GMT 
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Specially when he seemingly came out of nowhere.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:23 GMT 
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^ i was just thinking how powerful it must've been when it came out. sitting there in front of my speakers with Hard Rain on 10. reading the liner notes. gazing into the cover's iconic photo...to have this then - in the sixties - literally would have melted peoples minds, or crystallized urges they were trying to mentally annunciate...to match it with the actual times. good lord.

this album swims sonically just as much as blonde on blonde


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:25 GMT 
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Hard Rain is still stunning and "far out", I can't imagine hearing it in 1963.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:31 GMT 
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Troubadour64 wrote:
^ i was just thinking how powerful it must've been when it came out. sitting there in front of my speakers with Hard Rain on 10. reading the liner notes. gazing into the cover's iconic photo...to have this then - in the sixties - literally would have melted peoples minds, or crystallized urges they were trying to mentally annunciate...to match it with the actual times. good lord.

this album swims sonically just as much as blonde on blonde


Let's hope that doomedtoloveyou shows up. He/she said he/she ( :roll: let me know) was around when the debut was released so I assume.........


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 20:34 GMT 
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Troubadour64 wrote:
^ i was just thinking how powerful it must've been when it came out. sitting there in front of my speakers with Hard Rain on 10. reading the liner notes. gazing into the cover's iconic photo...to have this then - in the sixties - literally would have melted peoples minds, or crystallized urges they were trying to mentally annunciate...to match it with the actual times. good lord.

this album swims sonically just as much as blonde on blonde

it's still mind-melting, at least for me, i guess it helps that i haven't heard the songs as many times as some of you.


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