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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 13:13 GMT 
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An attempt to listen to all of Bob Dylan's studio albums in order over the summer, climaxing approximately with the release of the newest Bob Dylan album sometime in September. There will be about 2 albums per week. I'm not sure I can keep it going that long, anybody can pick up the ball on this one and start the next Summer Listening Challenge thread...

Part 2:
The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
Release: May 27, 1963

Listen and get back to us!

allmusic review:
It's hard to overestimate the importance of The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, the record that firmly established Dylan as an unparalleled songwriter, one of considerable skill, imagination, and vision. At the time, folk had been quite popular on college campuses and bohemian circles, making headway onto the pop charts in diluted form, and while there certainly were a number of gifted songwriters, nobody had transcended the scene as Dylan did with this record. There are a couple (very good) covers, with "Corrina Corrina" and "Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance," but they pale with the originals here. At the time, the social protests received the most attention, and deservedly so, since "Blowin' in the Wind," "Masters of War," and "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" weren't just specific in their targets; they were gracefully executed and even melodic. Although they've proven resilient throughout the years, if that's all Freewheelin' had to offer, it wouldn't have had its seismic impact, but this also revealed a songwriter who could turn out whimsy ("Don't Think Twice, It's All Right"), gorgeous love songs ("Girl From the North Country"), and cheerfully absurdist humor ("Bob Dylan's Blues," "Bob Dylan's Dream") with equal skill. This is rich, imaginative music, capturing the sound and spirit of America as much as that of Louis Armstrong, Hank Williams, or Elvis Presley. Dylan, in many ways, recorded music that equaled this, but he never topped it.


********************************************************************


Bob Dylan
Release: March 19, 1962
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=70175


The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
Release: May 27, 1963

The Times They Are a-Changin'
Release: January 13, 1964

Another Side of Bob Dylan
Release: August 8, 1964

Bringing It All Back Home
Release: March 22, 1965

Highway 61 Revisited
Release: August 30, 1965

Blonde on Blonde
Release: June 20, 1966

John Wesley Harding
Release: December 27, 1967

Nashville Skyline
Release: April 9, 1969

Self Portrait
Release: June 8, 1970

New Morning
Release: October 21, 1970

Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
Release: July 13, 1973

Dylan
Release: November 16, 1973

Planet Waves
Release: January 17, 1974

Blood on the Tracks
Release: January 17, 1975

The Basement Tapes
Release: June 26, 1975

Desire
Release: January 16, 1976

Street Legal
Release: June 15, 1978

Slow Train Coming
Release: August 20, 1979

Saved
Release: June 20, 1980

Shot of Love
Release: August 12, 1981

Infidels
Release: November 1, 1983

Empire Burlesque
Release: June 8, 1985

Knocked Out Loaded
Release: August 8, 1986

Down in the Groove
Release: May 31, 1988

Oh Mercy
Release: September 22, 1989

Under the Red Sky
Release: September 11, 1990

Good as I Been to You
Release: October 27, 1992

World Gone Wrong
Release: October 28, 1993

Time Out of Mind
Release: September 30, 1997

"Love and Theft"
Release: September 11, 2001

Modern Times
Release: August 29, 2006

Together Through Life
Release: April 28, 2009

Christmas in the Heart
Release: October 13, 2009


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 13:16 GMT 
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Cool . I feel like robbing every bank i see ! A great freewheelin' day to all of you :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 13:21 GMT 
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All right, for album #2, the playlist is:

Side one
1."Blowin' in the Wind"
2."Girl from the North Country"
3."Masters of War"
4."Down the Highway"
5."Bob Dylan's Blues"
6."A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall"
Side two
7."Don't Think Twice, It's All Right"
8."Bob Dylan's Dream"
9."Oxford Town"
10."Talkin' World War III Blues"
11."Corrina, Corrina"
12."Honey, Just Allow Me One More Chance"
13."I Shall Be Free"

Can't wait to get started on this one - just look at that list!!
Anybody got ideas for the outtakes?


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 13:25 GMT 
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Oh god, such a chore!


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 13:31 GMT 
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doomedtoloveyou wrote:
All right, for album #2, the playlist is:

Side one
1."Blowin' in the Wind"
2."Girl from the North Country"
3."Masters of War"
4."Down the Highway"
5."Bob Dylan's Blues"
6."A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall"
Side two
7."Don't Think Twice, It's All Right"
8."Bob Dylan's Dream"
9."Oxford Town"
10."Talkin' World War III Blues"
11."Corrina, Corrina"
12."Honey, Just Allow Me One More Chance"
13."I Shall Be Free"

Can't wait to get started on this one - just look at that list!!
Anybody got ideas for the outtakes?


I have these



Quote:
Bob Dylan
1st – 8th Freewheelin’ Sessions
April 24, 1962 – April 24, 1963
Howlin’ Husky
Edit / upgrade/ remaster: August 2007

CD 1. TIME 65.43

01. Mixed up confusions # 1 (single, vinyl)
02. That’s all right mama # 1 (Arthur Crudup)
03. Rocks & gravel # 1 (band version) on promotional edition
04. Corrina, Corrina # 1 (trad. band, single, vinyl)
05. Sally Gal # 1
06. I shall be free # 1 & # 2 takes
07. I shall be free # 3
08. I shall be free # 4 & # 5
09. Oxford town # 1 (take)
10. Hero blues # 1
11. Watcha gonna do # 1
12. Milk cow calf’s blues # 1 (Robert Johnson)
13. Baby I’m in the mood for you # 1 (Biograph version)
14. Rocks & gravel # 2 (acoustic)
15. Corrina, Corrina # 2 (trad. acoustic,)
16. Baby please don’t go (Big Joe Williams)
17. Let me die in my footsteps # 1 (complete)
18. The death of Emmett Till
19. Wichita # 1 (trad.)
20. Quit your low down ways # 1 (tbs version)

CD 2. TIME 63.21

1. Quit your low down ways # 2
2. Sally Gal # 2
3. Wichita # 2 (trad.)
4. Baby I’m in the mood for you # 2
5. Watcha gonna do # 2
6. Hero blues # 2
7. Milk cow calf’s blues # 2 (Robert Johnson)
8. Going to New Orleans / Louisiana Blues / My troubles have just begun
9. Lonesome whistle blues (Hank Williams / Jimmie Davies)
10. Talkin’ Hava Neigilah (tbs version)
11. Worried blues (tbs version) (Hally Wood)
12. Talkin’ Bear Mountain picnic massacre blues (tbs version)
13. Kingsport Town (tbs version)
14. Let me die in my footsteps # 2 (as # 1, but 1 verse missing, tbs version)
15. Walkin’ down the line (tbs version)
16. Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Willie (tbs version)
17. House carpenter (tbs version) ( BOB Dylan Sessions )
18. Mixed up confusion # 2 (take, longest)




CD 3. TIME 63.34

01. Blowin’ in the wind (take) + start comment
02. Girl from the North Country (take)
03. Masters of war (take?)
04. Bob Dylan’s blues (take)
05. A hard rain’s a-gonna fall (take)
06. Don’t think twice, it’s all right (take)
07. Bob Dylan’s dream (take)
08. Oxford Town # 2 (take)
09. Corrina, Corrina (as on disc 1 # 4) trad. single vinyl
10. I shall be free # 6 (take)
11. Tomorrow is a long time (outtake)
12. Let me die in my footsteps # 3 (short)
13. Talking John Birch Paranoid blues
14. Ballad of Hollis Brown (take)
15. That’s all right mama # 2 (Arthur Crudup)
16. Mixed up confusion # 3 (CD mix)
17. Mixed up confusion # 4 (Japanese mix)
18. Mixed up confusion # 5 (mix as on Biograph)
19. Mixed up confusion # 1 (vinyl as on # 1 disc 1) …. (+ end comment)



But i'm not sure if you can still find them here , recently all NTM's links died :(
Are there any more out there?
I wish i knew how to upload these ..


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 13:43 GMT 
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Quote:
I wish i knew how to upload these ..




So do I!! What a wonderful list of songs, Tragos!


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 15:55 GMT 
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I posted this on another thread, but I'll put it here, too:

In May 1962, Broadside published a new Dylan song, “Blowin’ in the Wind.” Set to a melody adapted from a spiritual, it combined indignation with Guthriesque simplicity and added a touch of original imagery. It received little circulation until nearly a year later, when Peter, Paul and Mary heard Dylan sing it at a coffeehouse. Their recording of the song sold a million copies, inspired more than fifty other versions, and established topical song as the most important development of the folk revival. The relative subtlety of the lyric made the topical movement aesthetically self-conscious. It did not drive out direct political statements — Dylan himself continued to write them — but it set a standard impossible to ignore, and topical songs began to show more wit, more craftsmanship, more variety.“Blowin’ in the Wind” was included in Dylan’s second album, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan, which appeared in May 1963. This time, nearly all the songs were his own; five had political themes. It was an extraordinary record. The influences had coalesced; the voice, unmusical as ever, had found an evocative range somewhere between abrasion and sentimentality; the lyrics (except for “Masters of War,” a simplistic diatribe against munitions-makers) were vibrant and pithy. The album contained what may still be Dylan’s best song — “It’s A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall,” a vivid evocation of nuclear apocalypse that owed much to Allen Ginsberg’s biblical rhetoric and declamatory style. Its theme was modern, its spirit ancient. At first hearing, most of the Freewheelin’ songs sounded less revolutionary than they were: so skillfully had Dylan distilled the forms and moods of traditional music that his originality took time to register.

Freewheelin’ illuminated Dylan’s America — or rather, two Americas. “Hard Rain” confronted the underside, “where the executioner’s face is always well-hidden,” “where black is the color and none is the number,” a world of deserted diamond highways, incipient tidal waves, clowns crying in alleys, children armed with guns and swords, “10,000 whisperin and nobody listenin” and occasional portents of redemption: “I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow.” The satirical “Talking World War III Blues” toured the country’s surface: hot dog stands, parking meters, Cadillacs, rockand-roll singers, telephone operators, cool females, officious doctors. Dylan’s moral outrage coexisted with a grudging affection for American society and its foibles. If there was “Masters of War,” there was also “I Shall Be Free”: “My telephone rang, it would not stop, it was President Kennedy callin me up./ He said my friend Bob what do we need to make this country grow I said my friend John, Brigitte Bardot.”For a time the outrage predominated.

From Ellen Willis's Dylan essay.


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 16:58 GMT 
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Using Steve Jobs' expression, Freewheelin' wasn't just great, it was "insanely great".

Still is!


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 21:24 GMT 
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doomedtoloveyou wrote:
Quote:
I wish i knew how to upload these ..




So do I!! What a wonderful list of songs, Tragos!


I'll post a request , doomed !


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 22:01 GMT 
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Listening right now. No words needed 8)


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 22:48 GMT 
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liner notes:







ALBUM INFO:

Produced by John Hammond

Of all the precipitously emergent singers of folk songs in the continuing renascence of that self-assertive tradition, none has equaled Bob Dylan singularity of impact. As Harry Jackson, a cowboy singer and a painter, has exclaimed: "He's so goddamned real it's unbelievable!" The irrepressible reality of Bob Dylan is a compound of spontaneity, candor, slicing wit and an uncommonly perceptive eye and ear for the way many of us constrict our capacity for living while a few of us don't.

Not yet twenty-two at the time of this albums release, Dylan is growing at a swift, experience-hungry rate. In these performances, there is already a marked change from his first album ("Bob Dylan," Columbia CL 1779/CS 8579), and there will surely be many further dimensions of Dylan to come. What makes this collection particularly arresting that it consists in large part of Dylan's own compositions The resurgence of topical folk songs has become a pervasive part of the folk movement among city singers, but few of the young bards so far have demonstrated a knowledge of the difference between well-intentioned pamphleteering and the creation of a valid musical experience. Dylan has. As the highly critical editors of "Little Sandy Review" have noted, "...right now, he is certainly our finest contemporary folk song writer. Nobody else really even comes close."

The details of Dylan's biography were summarized in the notes to his first Columbia album; but to recapitulate briefly, he was born on May 24, 1941, in Duluth, Minnesota. His experience with adjusting himself to new sights and sounds started early. During his first nineteen years, he lived in Gallup, New Mexico: Cheyenne, South Dakota; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Phillipsburg, Kansas; Hibbing, Minnesota (where he was graduated from high school), and Minneapolis (where he spent a restless six months at the University of Minnesota).

"Everywhere he went," Gil Turner wrote in his article on Dylan in "Sing Out," "his ears were wide open for the music around him. He listened to the blues singers, cowboy singers, pop singers and others -- soaking up music and styles with an uncanny memory and facility for assimilation. Gradually, his own preferences developed and became more , the strongest areas being Negro blues and county music. Among the musicians and singers who influenced him were Hank Williams, Muddy Waters, Jelly Roll Morton, Leadbelly, Mance Lipscomb and Big Joe Williams." And, above all others, Woody Guthrie. At ten he was playing guitar, and by the age of fifteen, Dylan had taught himself piano, harmonica and autoharp.

In February 1961, Dylan came East, primarily to visit Woody Guthrie at the Greystone Hospital in New Jersey. The visits have continued, and Guthrie has expressed approval of Dylan's first album, being particularly fond of the "Song to Woody" in it. By September of 1961, Dylan's singing in Greenwich Village, especially at Gerde's Folk City, had ignited a nucleus of singers and a few critics (notably Bob Shelton of the "New York Times") into exuberant appreciation of his work. Since then, Dylan has inexorably increased the scope of his American audiences while also performing briefly in London and Rome.

The first of Dylan's songs in this set is "Blowin' in the Wind." In 1962, Dylan said of the song's background: "I still say that some of the biggest criminals are those that turn their heads away when they see wrong and they know it's wrong. I'm only 21 years old and I know that there's been too many wars...You people over 21 should know better." All that he prefers to add by way of commentary now is: "The first way to answer these questions in the song is by asking them. But lots of people have to first find the wind." On this track, and except when otherwise noted, Dylan is heard alone-accompanying himself on guitar and harmonica.

"Girl From the North Country" was first conceived by Bob Dylan about three years before he finally wrote it down in December 1962. "That often happens," he explains. "I carry a song in my head for a long time and then it comes bursting out." The song-and Dylan's performance-reflect his particular kind of lyricism. The mood is a fusion of yearning, poignancy and simple appreciation of a beautiful girl. Dylan illuminates all these corners of his vision, but simultaneously retains his bristling sense of self. He's not about to go begging anything from this girl up north.

"Masters of War" startles Dylan himself. "I've never really written anything like that before," he recalls. "I don't sing songs which hope people will die, but I couldn't help it in this one. The song is a sort of striking out, a reaction to the last straw, a feeling of what can you do?" The rage (which is as much anguish as it is anger) is a away of catharsis, a way of getting temporary relief from the heavy feeling of impotence that affects many who cannot understand a civilization which juggles it's own means for oblivion and calls that performance an act toward peace.

"Down the Highway" is a distillation of Dylan's feeling about the blues. "The way I think about the blues," he says, "comes from what I learned from Big Joe Williams. The blues is more than something to sit home and arrange. What made the real blues singers so great is that they were able to state all the problems they had; but at the same time, they were standing outside them and could look at them. And in that way, they had them beat. What's depressing today is that many young singers are trying to get inside the blues, forgetting that those older singers used them to get outside their troubles."

"Bob Dylan's Blues" was composed spontaneously. It's one of what he calls his "really off-the-cuff songs. I start with an idea, and then I feel what follows. Best way I can describe this one is that it's sort of like walking by a side street. You gaze in and walk on."

"A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" represents to Dylan a maturation of his feelings on this subject since the earlier and almost as powerful "Let Me Die in My Footsteps," which is not included here but which was released as a single record by Columbia. Unlike most of his song-writing contemporaries among city singers, Dylan doesn't simply make a polemical point in his compositions. As in this sing about the psychopathology of peace-through-balance-of-terror, Dylan's images are multiply (and sometimes horrifyingly) evocative. As a result, by transmuting his fierce convictions into what can only be called art, Dylan reaches basic emotions which few political statements or extrapolations of statistics have so far been able to touch. Whether a song or a singer can then convert others is something else again.

"Hard Rain," adds Dylan, "is a desperate kind of song." It was written during the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962 when those who allowed themselves to think of the impossible results of the Kennedy-Khrushchev confrontation were chilled by the imminence of oblivion. "Every line in it," says Dylan, "is actually the start of a whole song. But when I wrote it, I thought I wouldn't have enough time alive to write all those songs so I put all I could into this one." Dylan treats "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" differently from most city singers . "A lot of people," he says, "make it sort of a love song-slow and easy-going. But it isn't a love song. It's a statement that maybe you can say to make yourself feel better. It's as if you were talking to yourself. It's a hard song to sing. I can sing it sometimes, but I ain't that good yet. I don't carry myself yet the way that Big Joe Williams, Woody Guthrie, Leadbelly and Lightnin' Hopkins have carried themselves. I hope to be able to someday, but they're older people. I sometimes am able to do it, but it happens, when it happens, unconsciously. You see, in time, with those old singers, music was a tool-a way to live more, a way to make themselves feel better at certain points. As for me, I can make myself feel better some times, but at other times, it's still hard to go to sleep at night." Dylan's accompaniment on this track includes Bruce Langhorne (guitar), George Barnes (bass guitar), Dick Wellstood (piano), Gene Ramey (bass) and Herb Lovelle (drums).

"Bob Dylan's Dream" is another of his songs which was transported for a time in his mind before being written down. It was initially set off after all-night conversation between Dylan and Oscar Brown, Jr., in Greenwich Village. "Oscar," says Dylan, "is a groovy guy and the idea of this came from what we were talking about." The song slumbered, however, until Dylan went to England in the winter of 1962. There he heard a singer (whose name he recalls as Martin Carthy) perform "Lord Franklin," and that old melody found a new adapted home in "Bob Dylan's Dream." The song is a fond looking back at the easy camaraderie and idealism of the young when they are young. There is also in the "Dream" a wry but sad requiem for the friendships that have evaporated as different routes, geographical and otherwise, are taken.

Of "Oxford Town," Dylan notes with laughter that "it's a banjo tune I play on the guitar." Otherwise, this account of the ordeal of James Meredith speaks grimly for itself.

"Talking World War III Blues" was about half formulated beforehand and half improvised at the recording session itself. The "talking blues" form is tempting to many young singers because it seems so pliable and yet so simple. However, the simpler a form, the more revealing it is of the essence of the performer. There's no place to hide in the talking blues. Because Bob Dylan is so hugely and quixotically himself, he is able to fill all the space the talking blues affords with unmistakable originality. In this piece, for example, he has singularly distilled the way we all wish away our end, thermonuclear or "natural." Or at least, the way we try to.

"Corrina, Corrina" has been considerably changed by Dylan. "I'm not one of those guys who goes around changing songs just for the sake of changing them. But I'd never heard Corrina, Corrina exactly the way it first was, so that this version is the way it came out of me." As he indicates here, Dylan can be tender without being sentimental and his lyricism is laced with unabashed passion. The accompaniment is Dick Wellstood (piano), Howie Collins (guitar), Bruce Langhorne (guitar), Leonard Gaskin (bass) and Herb Lovelle (drums).

"Honey, Just Allow Me One More Chance" was first heard by Dylan from a recording by a now-dead Texas blues singer. Dylan can only remember that his first name was Henry. "What especially stayed with me," says Dylan, "was the plea in the title." Here Dylan distills the buoyant expectancy of the love search.

Unlike some of his contemporaries, Dylan isn't limited to one or two ways of feeling his music. He can be poignant and mocking, angry and exultant, reflective and whoopingly joyful. The final "I Shall Be Free" is another of Dylan's off-the-cuff songs in which he demonstrates the vividness, unpredictability and cutting edge of his wit.

This album, in sum, is the protean Bob Dylan as of the time of the recording. By the next recording, there will be more new songs and insights and experiences. Dylan can't stop searching and looking and reflecting upon what he sees and hears. "Anything I can sing," he observes, "I call a song. Anything I can't sing, I call a poem. Anything I can't sing or anything that's too long to be a poem, I call a novel. But my novels don't have the usual story lines. They're about my feelings at a certain place at a certain time." In addition to his singing and song writing, Dylan is working on three "novels." One is about the week before he came to New York and his initial week in that city. Another is about South Dakota people he knew. And the third is about New York and a trip from New York to New Orleans.

Throughout everything he writes and sings, there is the surge of a young man looking into as many diverse scenes and people as he can find ("Every once in a while I got to ramble around") and of a man looking into himself. "The most important thing I know I learned from Woody Guthrie," says Dylan. "I'm my own person. I've got basic common rights-whether I'm here in this country or any other place. I'll never finish saying everything I feel, but I'll be doing my part to make some sense out of the way we're living, and not living, now. All I'm doing is saying what's on my mind the best way I know how. And whatever else you say about me, everything I do and sing and write comes out of me."

It is this continuing explosion of a total individual, a young man growing free rather than absurd, that makes Bob Dylan so powerful and so personal and so important a singer. As you can hear in these performances.

-- Nat Hentoff


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PostPosted: Thu May 31st, 2012, 23:50 GMT 
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Spinning it now. I know that Allen Ginsberg was probably talking about 1965-66 Bob when he referred to him as a "column of air," but 1963 is the year I think of when I hear that. He's completely on-breath, connected and and at ease.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 00:01 GMT 
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Tragos114 wrote:
Listening right now. No words needed 8)


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I'm reading Suze's book right now, so this album means even more. Anyone who hasn't read her book needs to remedy that immediately - I didn't realize the entire book was about Bob - it is. Truly. It fills in so many blanks about his life in NYC - I'm so glad he had her in his life at that time - he really did love her - and now I can hear her in so many of his songs during that period. In fact, the words to the following come to mind, as just one example:

Well, I’m walkin’ down the highway
With my suitcase in my hand
Yes, I’m walkin’ down the highway
With my suitcase in my hand
Lord, I really miss my baby
She’s in some far-off land

Well, your streets are gettin’ empty
Lord, your highway’s gettin’ filled
And your streets are gettin’ empty
And your highway’s gettin’ filled
Well, the way I love that woman
I swear it’s bound to get me killed

Well, I been gamblin’ so long
Lord, I ain’t got much more to lose
Yes, I been gamblin’ so long
Lord, I ain’t got much more to lose
Right now I’m havin’ trouble
Please don’t take away my highway shoes

Well, I’m bound to get lucky, baby
Or I’m bound to die tryin’
Yes, I’m a-bound to get lucky, baby
Lord, Lord I’m a-bound to die tryin’
Well, meet me in the middle of the ocean
And we’ll leave this ol’ highway behind

Well, the ocean took my baby
My baby stole my heart from me
Yes, the ocean took my baby
My baby took my heart from me
She packed it all up in a suitcase
Lord, she took it away to Italy, Italy


So, I’m a-walkin’ down your highway
Just as far as my poor eyes can see
Yes, I’m a-walkin’ down your highway
Just as far as my eyes can see
From the Golden Gate Bridge
All the way to the Statue of Liberty


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 00:09 GMT 
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Bob Dylan's Dream has gotta be one of his least-talked about major songs & I don't know why. It's amazing.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 00:11 GMT 
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^^ Amazing insight for such a young guy! Also brilliantly sung.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 00:17 GMT 
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Giada wrote:
Bob Dylan's Dream has gotta be one of his least-talked about major songs & I don't know why. It's amazing.

Yes, it is. Just one look at the words:

While riding on a train goin’ west
I fell asleep for to take my rest
I dreamed a dream that made me sad
Concerning myself and the first few friends I had

With half-damp eyes I stared to the room
Where my friends and I spent many an afternoon
Where we together weathered many a storm
Laughin’ and singin’ till the early hours of the morn

By the old wooden stove where our hats was hung
Our words were told, our songs were sung
Where we longed for nothin’ and were quite satisfied
Talkin’ and a-jokin’ about the world outside

With haunted hearts through the heat and cold
We never thought we could ever get old
We thought we could sit forever in fun
But our chances really was a million to one

As easy it was to tell black from white
It was all that easy to tell wrong from right
And our choices were few and the thought never hit
That the one road we traveled would ever shatter and split

How many a year has passed and gone
And many a gamble has been lost and won
And many a road taken by many a friend
And each one I’ve never seen again

I wish, I wish, I wish in vain
That we could sit simply in that room again
Ten thousand dollars at the drop of a hat
I’d give it all gladly if our lives could be like that


Every single verse is magnificent on its own - put together, the song is a masterpiece. And for a young man Dylan's age at the time to write those words is simply inconceivable.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 00:22 GMT 
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raging_glory wrote:
^^ Amazing insight for such a young guy! Also brilliantly sung.

Yes, Giada is pretty insightful!


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 00:22 GMT 
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haha


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 08:41 GMT 
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Iconic cover, iconic title, iconic songs, iconic voice... what an absolutely masterful iconic album it is!

This album is most certainly over-abundantly rich in great, great songs full of love and lost love, social conscience, humour and world weary knowing... stunningly sung.

I still don't know if this is an album full of poetry put to music or if it's an album full of songs that sound like poetry... I guess they are both... and it is breath-takingly amazing just how great these songs are... they are, simply... works of classic literature... they are high art... they are priceless gems... they are stunning!

I do not use the word 'masterpiece' lightly... but I feel that there is no question that this album is, most definately, a 'masterpiece'... a iconic masterpiece.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 12:59 GMT 
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doomedtoloveyou wrote:
Quote:
I wish i knew how to upload these ..




So do I!! What a wonderful list of songs, Tragos!


I think i made it

viewtopic.php?f=10&t=70214&p=1169173#p1169173

This is my first attempt so let me know if everything works


mp3 256 kbps , sound excellent




http://www.mediafire.com/download.php?hz236602qv5dnjl


http://www.mediafire.com/?u3qdxcwguc53han


http://www.mediafire.com/?nb74o5dl6sj75qw


Last edited by Tragos114 on Fri June 1st, 2012, 13:07 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 13:04 GMT 
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Thanks Tragos! Gonna work on dl'ing these this afternoon!


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 13:20 GMT 
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Thank you, Tragos!!!! :D :D I'll have to wait till I get home from work today to download those - but many thanks in advance!!


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 13:26 GMT 
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The leap in his songwriting in that one year between "Bob Dylan" and "Freewheelin'" is inexplicable, like jumping the Grand Canyon. How did he do it? Nobody knows.


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 13:58 GMT 
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6-9 + 11 might be my favorite 5 tracks . I had a bob Dylan dream last night... It was great I talked to him twice and he met my father...the new album is supposed to be very good from what I could tell...


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PostPosted: Fri June 1st, 2012, 13:59 GMT 
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He went to Crossroads, of course, Rev! :D


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