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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 04:19 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
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Location: City of Angels
http://youtu.be/7-YjEGyaRGc

They sat together in the park
As the evening sky got dark,
She looked at him and she felt a spark
tingle to her bones.
'Twas then she felt alone
and wished that she'd gone straight
And watched out for a simple twist of fate.

They walked along by the old canal
A little confused, I remember well
And stopped into a cheap hotel
with a neon burnin' bright.
She felt the heat of the night
hit her like a freight train
Moving down with a simple twist of fate.

A saxophone someplace softly played
As she was walkin' by the arcade.
Heard a melody rise and fade
The sun was comin up
She dropped a coin into the cup
of a blind man at the gate
And forgot about a simple twist of fate.

He woke up and the room was bare.
He didn't see her anywhere.
He told himself that he didn't care,
pushed back the blind,
Found a note she'd left behind
But he just could not relate
To anything but that simple twist of fate.

He hears the ticking of the clocks
Looks around through the city blocks,
Hunts her down by the waterfront docks
where the sailers all come in.
Maybe she'll see him again,
how long must he wait
Once more for a simple twist of fate.

People tell me it's a sin
To know and feel too much within.
I still believe she was my twin,
but I lost the ring.
She was born in spring,
but I was born too late
Blame it on a simple twist of fate.


Simply put, one of the finest songs Bob has ever written. It's so simply sung & illustrated, yet so perfect in every different iteration he's come up with over the years. The attention to detail, the sense of loss & hope all wrapped in one beautiful phrase, & the beautiful and under-appreciated melody that was imbued all make for a truly remarkable piece of songwriting that holds up and at times has become stronger throughout the years....

My personal favorite example comes from my all-time favorite live year: 1988...a beautiful, fiery, passionate performance by Bob & G.E. Smith that blows me away every time I hear it...

Portland ME
July 3 1988
http://www.sendspace.com/file/6tm9lb


Does anyone have any special stories, insights, favorite renditions, or just love for this beauty???
Thanks y'all! Love everyone here....It's always a pleasure to Track Talk with ER!!


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 06:41 GMT 
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SIMPLE TWIST OF FATE

Robert Shelton

In whispered understatement, the narrator’s painful recall, in dreams and imagination, is of loneliness. “He woke up, the room was bare” recalls It’s All Over Now Baby Blue and the lover who walked out the door with “all his blankets from the floor”. The singer remains in a dreamlike state of mordant rememberance until the third verse, when he chafes under the poet’s “sin” of too much vision, too much feeling.

Nigel Williamson

Any list of Dylan’s 50 greatest songs could have included six or seven from Blood On The Tracks. But if we must restrict ourselves to just three, Simple Twist Of Fate demands inclusion. Soft, mournful, hugely romantic and again painfully autobiographical, it boasts another powerful storytelling narrative and a strong claim to being one of the saddest songs ever written. As on Tangled Up In Blue, past and present are merged as Dylan recounts the moment of parting between two lovers but attempts to preserve some emotional distance by projecting his own experience into the third person.

We are not deceived, of course. First, because of his total immersion in the moment, betrayed by a voice which no method actor could manage. And second, because he acknowledges the truth in the final verse when he declares, “I still believe she was my twin” – he is keeping the faith and hoping that another twist of fate will throw him and Sara together again. After the release of the album, husband and wife did attempt to reconcile their differences, but their reunion was untimately disasterous and they divorced messily in 1977.

A Simple Twist Of Fate was not one of the Blood On The Tracks songs that Dylan felt compelled to re-record in Minneapolis after the album had been handed in to Columbia – the version heard on the record was cut in New York in September 1974 with Dylan’s guitar and harmonica accompanied only by Tony Brown’s bass.

Paul Williams

Simple Twist Of Fate is another absolutely extraordinary performance. Where Tangled Up In Blue is bright, bouncy, jangly, Simple Twist Of Fate is soft and warm and mournful. The edges of Dylan's voice are sharp (in a wonderfully sweet way) in the former song, but gentle and rounded in the latter. The first conjures the smell of the air on an early spring morning; the second is hot summer night. Dylan on this album has become a master of tex¬tures. Simple Twist Of Fate unmistakably creates the time, holds it, breathes it in, and stops it; the tools it uses to accomplish this are storytelling, imagery, phrasing, timing, vocal texture, rhyme, mel¬ody, and ensemble sound. The bass playing (content, timing, attack) is revelatory. The harmonica solos sum up the song's essence and push it out to the furthest corners of the universe.

The rhyming sequence and meter of the song / poem are truly elegant. Each verse rhymes AAABBCC, with the third A and sec¬ond B both internal rhymes (five-line verses). The C rhyme is always the same. As on Highway 61 Revisited, the songs on Blood On The Tracks tend to end each verse with their titles (in lieu of choruses): "tangled up in blue"; "simple twist of fate," "shelter from the storm"; "the Jack of Hearts." In this song, because the verses are short, this creates a rhyming resonance between the verses as well as within them. And the song's meter puts a little burst of emphasis on each rhyming word, in a pleasing, very lightly humor¬ous fashion, as if to say, "hey, we're singing poetry here."

I want to take a quick look at Dylan's vocal technique, as illustrated by his singing on the first verse of Simple Twist Of Fate. But first I have to say that attention to technique should not blind us to the fact that something very natural is occurring here – a man is singing a song and, because he feels so much as he is singing it, we feel a lot as we listen to him. We are moved by his presence, his passion. Technique is not the cause of presence but its byproduct. Dylan's passion spurs his inventiveness – he cares about the words and tune he has written and the story they tell, the feelings they unleash; this caring makes him more aware and present as he sings, so he is able to put more of himself into the mouthing of each word, the delivery and shaping of each note. The results are spectacular. The danger, however, is that we may (like Greil Marcus and other critics of Dylan's later work) be deafened to other great Dylan performances because we are waiting to hear him sing "like he did on Blood On The Tracks." We start waiting for a remembered form of greatness instead of opening ourselves to greatness itself.

So, remembering that the critter's tracks are not the critter, let us examine this first verse. What I notice is a subtle emphasis on the meter in the first line ("to-geth-er"), as if to establish the tempo (once it is established, Dylan is free to work against it), and the way the last word, "park," has a slightly breathy quality. Dylan is almost speaking (rather than singing) the lyrics, and then "park" hits a note that brings together the words and the beautiful, poignant melody established in the instrumental prologue. In the second line ("evening sky") I become aware of the huskiness in his voice, somehow central to establishing the mood and viewpoint of the story (cool and detached, but filled with intimations of shivering regret). "Dark" echoes "park" and is trumped by "spark," which becomes a springboard for the marvelous, characteristic twist in Dylan's voice as he sings "tingle to his bones" (once we would have considered this part of his "accent"; now we can see that his accent always served as an intuitive framework for expressive phrasing). While we have got the microscope out, note that there are two distinct emphases within this short phrase, cute on "tingle" and then decid¬edly eerie on "bones."

"Tingle to his bones" represents a mini-release from the ten¬sion established by the repeating, loping melody of the three open¬ing lines (the ones ending in "ark"). The real breakthrough comes at the end of the fourth line, the word "straight" (not overlooking the expressiveness with which Dylan sings "alone" earlier in the same line). The sonic hook that links together the verses (and gives the song its powerful cyclical effect) is this wonderful series of stressed "ate" words at the end of every line four ("straight," "freight," "gate," "relate," "wait," "late") as much as it is the deliciously anticlimactic "simple twist of fate" cleverly reintroduced in each line five. Notice also the impact of Dylan's phrasing of the verbs "wished" and "watched out."

And the song just gets better (how about the way he sings "heat of the night" in verse two? The word "cup" in verse three? "again" in verse five?). I love the resonance and dissonance between Tangled Up In Blue and Simple Twist Of Fate as the first two songs on the album. The titles sound similar (four words, one a preposition, and "twist" mimics "tangled"), both are acoustic-based ensemble performances, both narratives of love affairs. They sound like they could have the same protagonist (on a fairly simple level, we always believe the song is about the person singing it). And there is even an outra¬geous (accidental?) situational echo which turns out (or purports) to be a kind of pun when we read the lyrics: "hunts her down by the waterfront docks" in Simple Twist Of Fate naturally follows "[We] split up on the docks that night" in Tangled Up In Blue, which is the way I always heard it (and I know I'm not alone), till I read in the lyrics book that it's "[We] split up on a dark sad night." Oh.

But the songs are so different, too. In particular, although there are some sneaky pronouns, Simple Twist Of Fate as written is an unambiguous narrative, and instead of being about the char¬acter's whole life is about a single (12-hour) incident, albeit one that has come to dominate his life since. The pronouns (all "he" and "she" and "they" except for a stray "I" in verse two and full first person in verse six) can even be accounted for – Simple Twist Of Fate is consciously presented as a song in which the narrator is projecting his own experience into a story told in the third per¬son; he acknowledges this in passing in verse two and then deals with it directly at the end of the song ("I still believe she was my twin," what a great playful – and sincere – line for Dylan to throw at his audience!). It must be noted, however, since this is done so consciously, that we cannot claim to know the narrator is Dylan; rather, he has a created character who is telling a story about him¬self, like say Ishmael in Moby Dick.

Mojo 2005 Readers Poll #19

Neko Case – Mojo 100 Greatest Dylan Songs #73

There are some moments here – like where the guy is sitting on the park bench having these weird realisations – that you can actually feel them is he is having them. The way he sings the lines, “She looked at him and he felt a spark tingle to his bones / “twas then he felt alone and wished that he’d gone straight” – it is just devastating. There are so many moments like that which are so painful, but they are really honest and they are said in a way that I do not think anyone has said before – or since. I do not think Dylan even knows where songs like that come from. A lot of his songs seem born of that spirit.

Oliver Trager

Simple Twist Of Fate, Dylan’s sad, two-ships-passing-in-the-night tale of abandoned love, finds the poet at his most vulnerable. His delivery of the song on record is whispered, resigned, understated, and frustrated as he recounts his unsuccessful and obviously painful search for his departed lover in this oil painting of a song.

The guy singing Simple Twist Of Fate may keep telling himself he does not care, but his actions speak volumes as he scours the city’s nether fringes for his woman. He gives in to his remorse by the song’s end, but then puts blame on the simple twist of fate that brought them together in the first place. Is it the same twisted fate, he wonders, that eventually tore them apart?

Perhaps, as on Tangled Up In Blue, Dylan is singing about several intertwined characters and situations in Simple Twist Of Fate. But it appears obvious enough that there are but two players on this stage. The first verse finds the couple in a crepuscular setting worthy of a film’s opening shot – sitting in the park as sunrise turns into night. But even though she shakes his hand and he “feels a spark tingle to his bones” it was also “then he felt alone”.Slipping in and out of the third person, Dylan toys with the song’s point of view, shifting from the detached narrator to a probable participant and back again. It is as if he had betrayed some blood pact with himself, “They walked along by the old canel / A little confused, I remember well / And stopped into a strange hotel with a neon burnin’ bright / He felt the heat of the night hit him like a freight train”. He manages to keep the third-person mask attached over the course of the following three wrenching verses, but sheds it completely for the song’s climactic final scene – a monologue that seems to take place as the camera comes in for a close-up of our tragic narrator, “People tell me it’s a sin / To know and feel too much within / I still believe she was my twin, but I lost the ring / She was born in spring, but I was born too late / Blame it on a simple twist of fate”. It is as if in running away from his situation he ran full speed into himself.

Enhancing the emotional, narrative effectiveness of Simple Twist Of fate is its heart-tugging melody – a descending chord progression that Dylam mostly suspends through the first three lines of each verse until the tranquil resignation is shattered by a mournful howl as the fourth line is sung. The pain that has been carefully withheld finally comes bursting out like a crash on the levee.

Dylan first performed Simple Twist Of Fate on the television PBS special The World Of John Hammond, broadcast 10 September 1975, just before he made it a Rolling Thunder Revue staple. Since then, this bittersweet rumination has never been far from his mind, though it has never sounded better than it did during Dylan’s tentative return to secular music in late-1981. The 1978 version was, most agree, dreadful, as he sped up the tempo, which made him appear to trip over the words and thus taint one of the best songs from Blood On The Tracks. Once calling it his “invasion of privacy song”, Dylan stretched his performances of the song to an astonishing eight minutes when it was an acoustic set highlight of the 1992 leg of The Never Ending Tour. Thereafter, it has been an irregular but annual inclusion in his acoustic sets.

Clinton Heylin

Published lyric/s: Lyrics 85; Lyrics 04. [Variants: I Can Change I Swear; Words Fill My Head.]

Known studio recordings: A&R Studios, NYC, 16 September 11974 – 5 takes; 19 September 1974 – 3 takes [BoTT – tk. 3]

First known performance: The World Of John Hammond, Chicago IL, 10 September 1975.

Though it would appear Simple Twist Of Fate was another lyric formulated on the farm, the impetus for such a nostalgic song was much older. As Girl Of The North Country had been triggered by the breakup with Suze Rotolo, casting him back to an older affair, so Simple Twist Of Fate set him reflecting not on Sara, but on Suze – hence the song's subtitle in the notebook, “4th Street Affair”. That his former true love had been on his mind is evidenced by a phone call he had made on arriving in New York that spring. As Rotolo told Rock Wives author, Victoria Balfour, '”Out of the blue he called. He was with Lillian and Mel Bailey, old friends of both Bob and me. As I remember it, Mel was annoyed with Bob for calling me up again, "Leave her alone, she's married." I felt nervous.” For all its references, implied or explicit, to the time Rotolo sailed away to Italy, one rewrite he performed at a show in London on 30 June 1981, really gave the game away, “I remember Suze and the way that she talked.”

Simple Twist Of Fate is another song where Dylan felt “free enough to change all the – he and the she and the I and the you, and the we and the us”. And even in the song “his” Suze remains out of reach; because he is actually recalling how he sought solace in another lady's arms when Suze was in Italy during that painful summer of 1962.

By jumbling up the narrative, Dylan ensures that the listener never knows whether he is suggesting Suze was his lost twin, or the one-night stand he is now recalling in such delicious detail. (He still had not made up his mind by the time of Chronicles, wondering aloud if “maybe we [Suze and I] were spiritual soul-mates”.) The juxtaposition of an overwhelming sense of loss with a slightly sordid liaison is masterful, enhanced by Dylan's decision to rewrite the one verse that explicated the occasion as a liaison with a prostitute:

“A flute upon the corner played,
morning taps like a promenade,
As the light busts through a cut-up shade,
and sprayed upon the bed.
She raised her -weary head.
And couldn't help but hate
Cashing in on a simple twist of fate.”

On one level, the whole song is about the tricks memory plays. Ten years later, Dylan will reuse the idea on the even more impressive New Danville Girl. As he once said, “Certain things I can remember very clearly. Others are a kinda blur, but where I was and what was happening I can focus in on if I'm forced to.” Forcing himself to “focus in” for this song, his mind wanders into the same memoryscape already mined on Tangled Up In Blue – another love just out of reach. Like those star-crossed lovers, he knows that '”chance is the fool's name for fate”. Indeed, the final verse of Simple Twist Of Fate, in draft form, almost replicates the former's finale. He has once again “picked up her trail / She's either there or back in jail”. This time, though, he succumbs to the vagaries of fate with a metaphorical shrug of the shoulders, “She was born in spring, I was born too late.”

Refusing resolution to such a moving narrative is one of the song's greatest strengths. It also permitted Dylan to toy with the narrative for another decade, beginning in September 1975, when he took some of the lessons he had acquired from Desire co-lyricist Jacques Levy and applied them to the previous album. On the final verse of the version he debuted on a TV tribute to John Hammond, he is again stuck at the docks, but this time he feels:

“She should have caught me in my prime
She would have stayed with me
'Stead of going back off to sea
And leaving me to meditate.”

Interestingly enough, he suggested at one point that the song “was recorded, I think, two times – and one time it had one set of lyrics and another it had another set of lyrics. But the difference in lyrics wasn't that detrimental to the meaning of the song.” The Hammond version had evidently become, in his mind, another recording. In reality, he stuck doggedly to the notebook lyrics at the Blood On The Tracks sessions, though he began his ongoing experiments with the arrangement. On the first night, it was the one song he attempted both solo acoustic and “with band” (as clearly indicated on the tape log). Three days later he reverted to a stripped bare, bass/guitar arrangement, putting it on the record immediately after that other song where memory and fate played games, Tangled Up In Blue. Which is where it stayed through all the second guesses.

In concert, too, Tangled Up In Blue and Simple Twist Of Fate seemed to enjoy an almost symbiotic relationship. Through 1984, both continued to benefit from significant revamps at every pitstop, with Simple Twist Of Fate in particular seeming to bring out the best in Dylan the revisionist lyricist, year in, year out. In 1980-1981, he even made the lady of the night a close cousin of those other “witchy women”, Angelina and Claudette, as the pair:

“stepped into a waterfront hotel, with the neon burning dim
He looked at her and she looked at him
With that look that can manipulate.”

And still he continued to tap into the experience like it was yesterday.

By 1984 precious few vestiges of the original “4th Street Affair” remained. Instead, the duo had seemingly stepped out of a Malcolm Lowry novel to find themselves at the Grand Hotel “where the desk clerks dress in white / With a face as black as night”. This time, the narrator ends up throwing the woman out, accompanied by a characteristic verbal volley, “I taught you all you know. Now don't bother me no more.” Evidently, he was no longer prepared to let “witchy women” ru[i]n his life.

1987 marked another sea-change. The song reverted to its original lyrical template – as did all the Blood On The Tracks songs he now performed. And still, vestiges of the song's beating heart remained well into the Never Ending Tour, Dylan rarely failing to invest this, one of his most personal songs, with power and passion. Perhaps the version that reignited the song came early in the 1987 Temples in Flames tour, when he was again finding it hard to stop his libido a-wanderin'. At a show in Helsinki (23 September 1987), he seemed to remember everything about the song that mattered, in that moment demonstrating the full restoration of his performing powers.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 07:07 GMT 
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Sometimes I think I am the only person who sees this song for the tripe it is: regurgitated cliches, criminally bad rhymes and - for all its narrative shifts and supposed lack of resolution - about as convincing a depiction of romantic love as a Hollywood movie. It revolves around a line - 'simple twist of fate' - the implications of which are never explored; Dylan clearly came up with the title first and cobbled some imagery to it involving docks and sailers and saxophone players that is all scenery and no substance - a sort of Brel-lite -, and this is applauded as one of the greatest songs ever written! Do me a favour.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 08:53 GMT 
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Best song about a prostitute Bob Dylan ever wrote and recorded.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 14:31 GMT 
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I like the version he played @ the John Hammond tribute:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGgafB0RmE8

btw, marker, did you notice that in the lyrics you posted the point of view has been changed to that of a woman?


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 17:25 GMT 
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How is the melody under appreciated?? Listen to the song.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 17:57 GMT 
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I agree with Benny. And here's the corrected lyrics.

They sat together in the park
As the evening sky grew dark
She looked at him and he felt a spark tingle to his bones
’Twas then he felt alone and wished that he’d gone straight
And watched out for a simple twist of fate

They walked along by the old canal
A little confused, I remember well
And stopped into a strange hotel with a neon burnin’ bright
He felt the heat of the night hit him like a freight train
Moving with a simple twist of fate

A saxophone someplace far off played
As she was walkin’ on by the arcade
As the light bust through a beat-up shade where he was wakin’ up,
She dropped a coin into the cup of a blind man at the gate
And forgot about a simple twist of fate

He woke up, the room was bare
He didn’t see her anywhere
He told himself he didn’t care, pushed the window open wide
Felt an emptiness inside to which he just could not relate
Brought on by a simple twist of fate

He hears the ticking of the clocks
And walks along with a parrot that talks
Hunts her down by the waterfront docks where the sailors all come in
Maybe she’ll pick him out again, how long must he wait
One more time for a simple twist of fate

People tell me it’s a sin
To know and feel too much within
I still believe she was my twin, but I lost the ring
She was born in spring, but I was born too late
Blame it on a simple twist of fate


Interesting how the last word of the 3rd lines rhymes with a word in the middle of the 4th lines.

The loudness at the end of the 4th lines seems to indicate the passion or anguish involved in the story. These are obviously young people, young people fall in love easily and feel strong emotions.

It's all from the point of view of the singer and technically he has no way of knowing the facts in the third verse, but you don't notice because the story is almost entirely told in the third person.

The simple twist of fate may have to do with the fact, the way they got together was she picked him out, he did not pick her out. You don't learn this until the 24th line.

It's not until the 23rd line that you realize she is a prostitute. By then it is already established that she has a good heart.

I'm not sure what to make of the last verse.

It's a valid story and a good song. It just leaves out some details, which is OK.

The fact that all of the verses are structured and sang exactly the same means if you listen to it too much you might get tired of it.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 19:50 GMT 
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check out Loki singing the first verse:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ad24d13Z ... r_embedded
starts 6:01


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 21:21 GMT 
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"Simple Twist of Fate" is one of his greatest song titles....a perfect fit to the lyrics and music.


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 23:43 GMT 

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Giada wrote:
I like the version he played @ the John Hammond tribute:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGgafB0RmE8

btw, marker, did you notice that in the lyrics you posted the point of view has been changed to that of a woman?



EEK! Thanks Giada for pointing that out and carnap for correcting me :oops:
Though I must say, it still sort of works....

Anyway, I love that John Hammond version and I was pleased to hear Jeff Tweedy's version from I'm Not There pretty much faithfully re-creating that lovely rendition
http://youtu.be/ud85cZMWS-M


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PostPosted: Sat May 12th, 2012, 23:49 GMT 
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He does sing those different lyrics on some version that I have, but I can't remember which one.


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PostPosted: Sun May 13th, 2012, 02:21 GMT 
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July 3rd 1998 is Montreux, Switzerland and doesn't have Simple Twist of Fate, can you clarify where that version is from?


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PostPosted: Mon May 14th, 2012, 10:45 GMT 
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A lot of great performances of this song through the years but I go back to Bird's Nest In Your Hair (Earl's Court, 29 June 1981) boot more often than any other. The piano part is captivating and he sings it with the gospel show passion.

Through the years he's added or changed phrases at one show or another which have brought a smile or even puzzled me for a moment. Most of the time it seems he really enjoys playing it. He's played with the arrangement continuously and most of them I enjoyed but the more recent (2010/11?) are my least favorite.


Last edited by Untrodden Path on Mon May 14th, 2012, 10:51 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon May 14th, 2012, 10:50 GMT 
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For some reason this song always comes to mind whenever I am sat in a park as evening descends.


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PostPosted: Mon May 14th, 2012, 16:30 GMT 
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Giada wrote:
check out Loki singing the first verse:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ad24d13Z ... r_embedded
starts 6:01


i loved that interview!


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PostPosted: Mon May 14th, 2012, 19:25 GMT 
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So many great versions over the years but if I had to keep one it would Sarasota, November 11th, 1992. A very sad, delicate, quietly majestic version. Bob's singing is as graceful as an acrobat and the band is powerful and the band is tight and powerful yet understated at the same time.


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PostPosted: Tue May 15th, 2012, 17:02 GMT 
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thickboy wrote:
For some reason this song always comes to mind whenever I am sat in a park as evening descends.

I'm always reminded of it when I'm hit by a freight train!

carnap wrote:
It's all from the point of view of the singer and technically he has no way of knowing the facts in the third verse, but you don't notice because the story is almost entirely told in the third person.

Well, we're on our favourite subject here carnap! I think that it would have been quite easy to tell the story in the third person, and then pull back in the last verse to reveal the narrator as the main male protagonist, that would have been a standard trick. But the fact that theres' just that tiny little aside before then revealing the narrator's involvement ("a little confused, I remember well") is such a sweetly judged move by Dylan, and quite audacious.

The Live 75 version is one of my favourite performances by Dylan - and it's a song that requires him to bring his A-game in terms of phrasing or risk falling flat.


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PostPosted: Tue May 15th, 2012, 19:28 GMT 
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Here's a link to the Sarasota 1992 performance. Love the way he phrases the 'freight' verse.

http://www.mediafire.com/?de1h9xosw4r1bad

To my ears, the song never sounded as good as this again until the latest incarnation.


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PostPosted: Tue May 15th, 2012, 19:56 GMT 
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RE Trev's post.

I agree, A little confused, I remember well is a nice aside in the first person. This could be sung by a guy or a girl. It's like the old Maurice Chevalier, Hermione Gingold song.

The last verse is also an interesting venture into the first person (but it's not clear to me what he means).

People tell me it’s a sin
To know and feel too much within
I still believe she was my twin, but I lost the ring
She was born in spring, but I was born too late
Blame it on a simple twist of fate

This makes you think the singer is the guy in the song. But you could interpret it so that the singer is actually a third person (guy or girl) and not one of the two people in the song.


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PostPosted: Tue May 15th, 2012, 21:06 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
Posts: 1518
Location: City of Angels
Roving Gambler wrote:
Here's a link to the Sarasota 1992 performance. Love the way he phrases the 'freight' verse.

http://www.mediafire.com/?de1h9xosw4r1bad

To my ears, the song never sounded as good as this again until the latest incarnation.


Amen!! Absolutely gorgeous performance with some incredible harp work there at the end!! Getting the whole concert now!!!

THANK YOU!!


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PostPosted: Sat May 11th, 2013, 08:39 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
Posts: 1518
Location: City of Angels
Every once in a while you stumble across a Dylan performance
where it feels as if he's writing the song just as he the words
spill out of his mouth....generally the band notices this and
can augment it perfectly creating a few minutes of bliss....
when it happens to a great song, such as this one, it's unforgettable....

If you've never heard this, do yourself a favor:

Monterey CA
May 27 1995
http://www.sendspace.com/file/nwpvpz


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PostPosted: Sat May 11th, 2013, 12:46 GMT 
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^Lovely. Thanks Marker.


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PostPosted: Sat May 11th, 2013, 13:06 GMT 
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Location: Above the equator
Perfect song. Enough said.


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PostPosted: Sat May 11th, 2013, 14:36 GMT 
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Location: Where the swift don't win the race
I think its been documented elsewhere that this song only enters the setlist on the nights after Bob experiences a so-called Simple Twist of Fate.


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PostPosted: Sat May 11th, 2013, 15:41 GMT 
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Joined: Sat October 27th, 2007, 12:44 GMT
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Location: Workin' as a postal clerk
thickboy wrote:
A few weeks ago I was in a shop buying some tacks. As I paid the shopkeeper for the tacks he unexpectedly pulled out a large axe and chopped off my arm... blood gushed all over the box of tacks.

Despite the seriousness of the situation I have to admit that I did smile as the blood on the box of tacks obviously made me recall Dylans' wonderful Blood on the Tracks album.

Which album have you recalled whilst being faced with a serious situation?

The best answer will win an arm.


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