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PostPosted: Sat January 2nd, 2010, 01:22 GMT 
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An in-depth look at the original version of "Down In The Groove"
by My Echo, My Shadow And Me

I. Introduction
"Down In The Groove" stands alone as probably the worst received studio album in Dylan's oeuvre. Many critics (and many fans) lump it together with "Knocked Out Loaded" and see those two records as the "nadir" of his recorded output. Few take the time and really listen to the albums in order to appreciate what is there. Most slag off the records for not being what they want them to be. Compare the albums with an open mind and the first thing you realize is how different they really are. "Knocked Out Loaded" was put together from sessions that took place in studios in New York, Los Angeles and London over a period of 22 months involving a large number of musicians. Dylan lined up several over-dub sessions to give the basic tracks their unique atmosphere and a unison in sound. Special mention must be made of the great use of the backing singers and the horns. Especially the Tejano tones in the brass give the album a highly individual sound. Do yourself a favour, get the album on vinyl and play it loud. The production and the mix will make sense and you will appreciate the huge and very rich sound created by Dylan on that record. "Down In The Groove" on the other hand is something different entirely. The original version of the album was recorded in Los Angeles over a short period of time (4 weeks in April/May 1987), with a small group of musicians. The sound is very basic and "earthy" with minimal over-dubs.

II. Perspective
The state of the record business and Dylan's relationship with his record company in 1987: Dylan's label Columbia Records at that point was still owned by CBS (CBS was sold to Sony in January 1988) who at the time were totally in thrall of their two "flagship" artists: Bruce Springsteen and Michael Jackson. Both had new albums lined up for release in 1987 ("Tunnel Of Love" – Springsteen, "Bad" – Jackson). Both artists' previous studio albums had been monstrously successful ("Born In The USA" – Springsteen, "Thriller" – Jackson). To say expectations for their new albums were running high at CBS would be a grave understatement. Jackson was seriously aiming at shifting 100 (!) Million copies of "Bad". Expectations for Springsteen's new album were going through the roof, too. Also under contract to CBS at the time were The Rolling Stones (plus Mick Jagger as a solo artist). Jagger's second solo album, the ambitious "Primitive Cool" featuring several big name guests was due for release in the summer of 1987. At the same time Walter Yetnikoff – president of CBS from 1975–1990 – was in the process of sinking into his own personal hell of alcoholism and cocaine addiction (he checked into rehab in 1989 and managed to turn his life around). It was in this climate that Dylan quietly finished his new LP of mostly cover versions of "obscure" songs from the 1950s and 1960s. When the record company people did take the time to listen to the master authorized by Dylan in August 1987 it probably was not met with great excitement. The album they heard consisted of:

Side One:
1. Let's Stick Together
2. When Did You Leave Heaven?
3. Got Love If You Want It
4. Ninety Miles An Hour (Down A Dead End Street)
5. Sally Sue Brown

Side Two:
1. Ugliest Girl In The World
2. Silvio
3. Important Words
4. Shenandoah
5. Rank Strangers


Over the years there have been conflicting reports as to which version of the album is the first version. The emergence of an acetate dated August 7, 1987 carrying the above songs proves that the above version actually is the first – check the great searchingforagem.com for details. The record simply was nothing like the albums a major record company had come to expect from their megastars at the time. Still CBS did prepare a promo cassette which was distributed in November 1987. This original version of the album was previewed quite favorably in UK music weekly Melody Maker in March 1988. CBS meanwhile instigated changes to the track list and pushed back the release date. Some people think that Dylan himself was behind the changes. I think he simply grew tired of arguing about his work with CBS and at some point threw up his hands and let CBS do what they thought they had to do. Over the following months (late 1987/early 1988) CBS changed the track list TWICE and designed the cover and promo artwork using old photos of Dylan from 1985/86 (one had even been used before), Dylan apparently having withdrawn all cooperation on the project. An early version of the cover artwork (to go with Dylan's version of the album?) had a photo of what looks like a Californian landscape complete with palm trees on the front. As to the musical content CBS first went back to the sessions directly preceding "Down In The Groove", extracting "The Usual" from the "Hearts Of Fire" soundtrack and taking "Important Words" off the album. This version of "Down In The Groove" was given out as a promo cassette in February 1988. In Argentina the master of this second version of the album was used accidentally for the first run of "Down In The Groove" LPs. After that the release date was pushed back once more. The running order of the tracks was changed, "Got Love If You Want It" and "The Usual" were taken off the album and replaced with "Had A Dream About You, Baby" (a remixed version of the "Hearts Of Fire" recording) and "Death Is Not The End" (an "Infidels" outtake). With a Dylan tour starting in June 1988 CBS/Sony refrained from further changes to the album and finally dropped the LP onto the market in May 1988. The critics had already made up their minds about the record in the run-up to that date – the internal quarrels at CBS about getting the album finished and released were taken up by the reviewers with malicious relish: They branded the album "a failure" and "a disaster". I always liked the album even if "Had A Dream About You, Baby" and "Death Is Not The End" (great as it is) really sit quite awkwardly among the other tracks. To me the record always seemed like a puzzle that had been put together the wrong way, with pieces from another puzzle thrown in. I always thought there was more to this record than what you hear on the official version. What shines through and what can be made out by those who want to hear it, is of course the original version of the record. Luckily copies of the first promo cassette carrying that version survived and have been circulating for years. The differences between the first promo and the official version seem small (two different songs, different running order) but they change everything. What to many critics seemed like a "random collection of throwaway cover versions" makes perfect sense on the original version of the record where the songs hang together quite beautifully. To me the original "Down In The Groove" is one of Dylan's most important records, recorded as it was in the watershed year of 1987. It foreshadows everything that followed. It is a carefully constructed, well thought out record with a beautiful, organic sound and great vocals.

III. The music behind "Down In The Groove"
At his shows in Japan, Australia, New Zealand and North America in 1986 Dylan played a fairly large number of songs from the 1950s. Songs by Billy Riley, Ricky Nelson, Ray Charles, Warren Smith ... Songs he must have known since he started his first bands in Hibbing. The songs that first started him off as a musician. As he has said repeatedly he carries "that other time, the 1950s" with him. And in the Spring of 1987 he took the sounds of that era into the studio with him in the form of the material he was going to record. Songs from the 1950s and early 1960s. If you take a look at the artists and records Dylan chose to cover on his version of "Down In The Groove" a world of forgotten artists, obscure 45s, rare B-sides and all the musical styles that Dylan draws from opens up. You encounter Rockabilly, Rhythm & Blues, Blues, Country, Bluegrass, Rock 'n' Roll, Jazz, Traditionals, Standards and Movie Soundtracks. You come across labels with names like Sun, Excello, King, Fury, Vocalion. Code names from an era when a record could change your life. You also meet people like producer Bobby Robinson – a trailblazer who changed the way we listen to music today. Like no other record in Dylan's catalogue the original version of "Down In The Groove" is like a peek into his Minnesota/pre-New York era record collection. It is all there – "down in the groove". If you are willing to take a look at the records behind the record and if you connect the dots the original "Down In The Groove" is like a doorway into Dylan's universe of song and sound.

The songs and their sources:
1. Let's Stick Together – Wilbert Harrison (released on Bobby Robinson's Fury Records, 1962)
Wilbert Harrison himself re-recorded the song as "Let's Work Together" (Sue Records, 1969). That later version was recorded by many other artists and consequently is well known. Dylan on the other hand faithfully covers the original super-rare* 1962 version.

2. When Did You Leave Heaven? – Henry "Red" Allen (Vocalion, 1936)
The original version by Tony Martin from the movie "Sing, Baby, Sing" also came out in 1936. Over the years countless artists have covered the song. Dylan probably knows a large number of those recordings. His vocals and the structure of his interpretation closely follow Henry "Red" Allen's 1936 version. The song is the kind of standard that Dylan has probably been aware of ever since he was a child. Other interesting versions are by Big Bill Broonzy (solo acoustic, Vogue, 1951), Little Jimmy Scott (a genre unto himself, Savoy, 1955), Charles Brown (smooth and relaxed blues version, East-West, 1957), Smiley Lewis (New Orleans R&B, Imperial, 1957, released in 1986), Louis Armstrong (lavishly arranged, Decca, 1957), Percy Mayfield (fast R&B version, Specialty, 1960) and Johnny Guitar Watson (almost abstract and very slow piano blues version, Chess, 1964).

3. (I've) Got Love If You Want It – Slim Harpo (Excello Records, 1957 – the original version) AND Warren Smith (Sun Records, 1957)
A song that I think is essential to understanding the album as it points to two important sounds driving Dylan. The "Excello" sound and the "Sun" sound. He spoke about the importance of a label's SOUND in the 1950s/early 1960s on "Theme Time Radio Hour" # 43. Harpo and Smith have been referenced many times by Dylan over the years. He has covered Smith' "Red Cadillac And A Black Moustache" in concert and on record and played the original on his radio show. Lanois has quoted Dylan as saying that he wanted "Time Out Of Mind" to have the sound of Harpo's Excello records. Dylan's recording of "Got Love" cleverly merges elements of both Harpo's and Smith' version.

4. Ninety Miles An Hour (Down A Dead End Street) – Hank Snow (RCA, 1963)
Hank Snow, an important early influence on Dylan with his song "The Golden Rocket". Dylan also played Snow's "I'm Movin' On" in concert and covered "A Fool Such As I" on record and played it on "Theme Time Radio Hour".

5. Sally Sue Brown – Arthur "June" Alexander (Judd Records, 1960) [Judd Records was owned by Sam Phillip's brother Jud and like Sam's Sun Records operated out of Memphis]
The A-Side of Arthur Alexander's ultra-rare* first single. The B-Side "The Girl That Radiates That Charm" is pretty cool, too. Alexander himself released a new version of the song on his great 1993 album "Lonely Just Like Me".

6. Ugliest Girl In The World – Dylan/Hunter original in an authentic '50s R & B sound and style.

7. Silvio – Dylan/Hunter original in the style of a Stanley Brothers/Johnny & Jack bluegrass tune.

8. Important Words – Gene Vincent (Capitol Records, 1957, B-Side of "Crazy Legs")
Vincent re-recorded the song in the early '60s. Dylan follows the rare* 1957 recording. He probably had it on vinyl ever since it first came out. According to Dylan's Hibbing era friend and sometimes band member John Bucklen Gene Vincent & His Blue Caps were of major importance to them when Dylan started his first bands in Hibbing. At one point they even got blue caps like the ones worn by The Blue Caps on the covers of Vincent's first two albums. The 1994 soundtrack album to the movie "Natural Born Killers" includes a new Dylan recording of Gene Vincent's version of "You Belong To Me".

9. Shenandoah – Spider John Koerner (Red House, 1986)
There are many different versions of the old traditional song "Shenandoah" (aka "(Across) The Wide Missouri"). Most artists do the song as a slow ballad. Dylan took the springy rhythm and the entire set of lyrics straight from Koerner's recording, which came out a year before Dylan recorded "Down In The Groove". It can be found on Koerner's LP "Nobody Knows The Trouble I've Been" (January 1986), which was re-released on CD in 1992. The inclusion of a version of Spider John Koerner's interpretation of the song can be seen as a nod to Dylan's Minneapolis/St. Paul coffeehouse days in 1959/60. It was during that period that Dylan first met and became friends with Koerner who became an important early influence.

10. Rank Strangers – The Stanley Brothers (King Records, 1960)
Dylan of course played MANY Stanley Brothers tunes in concert in 1997–2002 and also recorded "Lonesome River" with Ralph Stanley in 1997.

*One has to remember that "Down In The Groove" was recorded BEFORE the CD boom and WAY BEFORE the downloading craze. Most of the songs Dylan chose to record were out of print at the time of the "Down In The Groove" sessions and therefore very difficult to get hold of. He probably sourced all of them from his personal collection.

VI. Summary
The original version of "Down In The Groove" as it stands not only covers all the musical styles that are cornerstones of the Rock 'n' Roll era, it also references many important record labels of that period of time. Furthermore it literally maps out the Rock 'n' Roll and pre-Rock 'n' Roll landscape of the United States by touching upon sounds, record companies and protagonists from all relevant regions. It does so by avoiding the obvious and by spotlighting a kind of shadow history of Rock 'n' Roll. It is obvious that a lot of research and careful planning went into the conception and construction of this record.
In addition the album not only shows the way to the hidden treasures of the music of the 1950s and early 1960s. It also lays out the steps Dylan was about to take during the "Never-Ending Tour"-years. In the studio and on the stage. And on the radio: The source material plays like a lost edition of "Theme Time Radio Hour".

The album must be seen as a very personal piece of work by somebody who started out in popular music in the Rock 'n' Roll era of the 1950s – almost like a snapshot of one Rockabilly cat's record collection and at the same time a panoramic portrait of "Americana" music in general.
Another undeniable quality of the record is that its sound stood the test of time. Just compare it to other records from the '80s. It still sounds fresh and vibrant. Maybe even more so today than in 1987/88. A timeless piece of work.
One wishes Sony would release a remastered and reconstructed version of "Down In The Groove" with the songs and their running order intact again ("Had A Dream About You, Baby" could go on a future collection of "official rarities", "Death Is Not The End" could be re-released on a future edition of "The Bootleg Series – The 'Infidels' Sessions").

Finally the record is unique in Dylan's catalogue as an album that focuses on songs he must know from the time before he became famous himself. Later "cover albums" include many songs that Dylan picked up after he had become a recording artist himself. As such the original "Down In The Groove" is a very important work as it spotlights the music that shaped Dylan when he started out in music. It presents the songs, the music and the sounds that originally inspired him to step out on stage and sing.


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PostPosted: Sat January 2nd, 2010, 02:06 GMT 
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Nicely done-makes me want to hear it in this form! Are the mixes different?


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PostPosted: Sat January 2nd, 2010, 09:18 GMT 
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smoke wrote:
Nicely done-makes me want to hear it in this form! Are the mixes different?


"Let's Stick Together" has a longer fade-out. Other than that the songs that are on the official version and the original August 1987 version are the same on both.


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PostPosted: Sat January 2nd, 2010, 10:25 GMT 
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i am confused is it possible to get the tracks which are not on my copy


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PostPosted: Sat January 2nd, 2010, 10:46 GMT 
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JKELLY wrote:
i am confused is it possible to get the tracks which are not on my copy


"Got Love (...)" and "Important Words" are on "Hard To Find Vol. 4":

viewtopic.php?f=26&t=33006


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PostPosted: Sat January 2nd, 2010, 10:57 GMT 
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Thanks for taking the time and energy to do this! I agree that hearing these much-maligned LP's on vinyl makes a huge difference in their sound. This makes me want to track down the missing songs and track it together in the way you describe.


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PostPosted: Sat January 2nd, 2010, 16:34 GMT 

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Fascinating! Thank you so much. This sort of appreciation is the reason I visit ER.


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2010, 10:07 GMT 
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lotta nerve wrote:
Fascinating! Thank you so much. This sort of appreciation is the reason I visit ER.


Thank you for taking the time!


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2010, 11:16 GMT 

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dylankicks wrote:
Thanks for taking the time and energy to do this! I agree that hearing these much-maligned LP's on vinyl makes a huge difference in their sound.


What pills you vinylists use. Only difference I can hear is hisss and pops?


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2010, 13:00 GMT 
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Futile Horn wrote:
dylankicks wrote:
Thanks for taking the time and energy to do this! I agree that hearing these much-maligned LP's on vinyl makes a huge difference in their sound.


What pills you vinylists use. Only difference I can hear is hisss and pops?


Listen to dynamics. Most digital music lacks wide range of dynamics. Usually it's not that important but when you listen to hips & hips of music it makes difference.



And great post by EchoShadowMe about the album I diss also, I'll give it a listen again. I'll see.


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2010, 15:38 GMT 
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My Echo, My Shadow And Me wrote:
An in-depth look at the original version of "Down In The Groove"
by My Echo, My Shadow And Me
...

The songs and their sources:
1. Let's Stick Together – Wilbert Harrison (released on Bobby Robinson's Fury Records, 1962)
Wilbert Harrison himself re-recorded the song as "Let's Work Together" (Sue Records, 1969). That later version was recorded by many other artists and consequently is well known. Dylan on the other hand faithfully covers the original super-rare* 1962 version.

...



This was also the title track on Bryan Ferry's 1976 album:

Image

I think the DITG version owes something to Ferry's cover


Great OP, My Echo, My Shadow And Me. Image


.


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2010, 15:51 GMT 
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That was a very enjoyable read. It seems like a really great album as long as you don't listen to it.


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2010, 17:23 GMT 
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darkknight wrote:
My Echo, My Shadow And Me wrote:
An in-depth look at the original version of "Down In The Groove"
by My Echo, My Shadow And Me
...

The songs and their sources:
1. Let's Stick Together – Wilbert Harrison (released on Bobby Robinson's Fury Records, 1962)
Wilbert Harrison himself re-recorded the song as "Let's Work Together" (Sue Records, 1969). That later version was recorded by many other artists and consequently is well known. Dylan on the other hand faithfully covers the original super-rare* 1962 version.

...



This was also the title track on Bryan Ferry's 1976 album:

Image

I think the DITG version owes something to Ferry's cover


Great OP, My Echo, My Shadow And Me. Image


.


Ferry's interpretation sounds similar to Dylan's recording, because – like Dylan – he is following the original by Wilbert Harrison: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NSQI51dppg


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2010, 18:02 GMT 

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It's still got seeders at HC:

http://www.hungercity.org/details.php?id=1683


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2010, 23:34 GMT 
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Three legged man wrote:
That was a very enjoyable read. It seems like a really great album as long as you don't listen to it.
This is NOT what we expect from a Senior Moderator! We come here expecting those whose responsibilities include oversight to posts and Expecting Rain to refrain from taking cheap shots at the master himself and his wonderful work. Had you made such a comment about one of his works from the 60s, that would be understandable but a cheap shot at Down In the Groove?! And after such a great post by My Echo, My Shadow And Me.

I hardly know what to say... It's a good thing Christmas is over. You may have only found a lump of coal in your stocking this year.


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PostPosted: Mon January 4th, 2010, 01:22 GMT 

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Terrific post, and I've always enjoyed Down in the Groove. Thanks to your post I've created a re-sequenced playlist and added the 2 missing songs, placing the 2 "extra" tracks at the end. It does indeed work better.

I listen to Down in the Groove far more than Empire Burlesque or Knocked Out Loaded. It doesn't sound nearly as dated.


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PostPosted: Mon January 4th, 2010, 03:53 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
Three legged man wrote:
That was a very enjoyable read. It seems like a really great album as long as you don't listen to it.
This is NOT what we expect from a Senior Moderator! We come here expecting those whose responsibilities include oversight to posts and Expecting Rain to refrain from taking cheap shots at the master himself and his wonderful work. Had you made such a comment about one of his works from the 60s, that would be understandable but a cheap shot at Down In the Groove?! And after such a great post by My Echo, My Shadow And Me.

I hardly know what to say... It's a good thing Christmas is over. You may have only found a lump of coal in your stocking this year.


Funny, three legged's thoughts were mine exactly. Very nicely researched article though.


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PostPosted: Mon January 4th, 2010, 04:18 GMT 

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I always thought the worst aspect of the album was the production. Synths and folk do not mix well.
But this version is much different. I'm not an audiophile, but this album has a life to it where my CD sounds lifeless. One can hear many more virtues to the album and the overall feeling is much richer. Recently, Bennyboy offered the last 5 albums on vinyl and I haven't listened to those albums as much as I have in the last two weeks. All of a sudden, those albums are important to me again like they once were when they were released, especially Modern Times. But I suspect this will be longer.
Some personal thoughts:
Though I still find Ugliest Girl sort of repulsive, now it's at least understandable in the overall mix. It's a stupid song still. Unlike most, Silvio I've always liked live. But the album cut was a dud. But not here. It sounds old and blustery, like an old record.
Overall too, the sequencing is much better and the last three songs are stunningly beautiful.
Again, one has to accept Bob as he was in 88, but I have and I do. But this is a far better representation than what I've had.
I'm now a vinyl worshiper. It's really a great creation Shadow. Thanks again.

P.S
What I've done (for my own listening pleasure) is cut out Ugliest Girl, switched it with Silvio (appropriately opening Side 2) and replaced Death Is Not The End in the No. 2 spot. Perfect.


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PostPosted: Tue January 5th, 2010, 01:05 GMT 

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Thanks for an excellent post and a very thought-provoking and intriguing read. No doubt a lot of consideration, research and investigation went into it. I’ve always felt the album was not as bad as some have made it out to be, but your post gives a much better appreciation of it. You’ve inspired me to explore this LP again, re-sequence the playing order, and listen to it in a new light. Thanks again.
PS. I too have always enjoyed vinyl over the “sterile” sound of most CD’s, pops and hiss notwithstanding.


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PostPosted: Tue January 5th, 2010, 15:18 GMT 
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Listening to the "original" version of Down In The Groove is a real pleasure.

To me, the main issue of the bad reputation of the album (with or without swapped songs and changed running orders) is the time of when it was released. Dylan had a bad reputation in the published opinion at latest after the Live Aid desaster (my words). And of course that published opinion has had an impact on the opinion of indivduals, even on fans. The inclusion of the two alien songs (with or without Dylan's blessing) didn't make things better.

But to all of you Down In The Groove haters:
Just imagine there were no such album until after the Theme Time Radio Shows. After airing some of those songs in their original version and songs accompanied them in time and style, too, Dylan would have gone into a studio to record the songs in question in his own version to make an album called Down In The Groove. Wouldn't everybody have been arisen out of their easy chairs to yell: What a masterpiece!!! ?

See, everything Dylan was doing in the eighties was all wrong, everything Dylan is doing now is all right. He even can bring out an album with Christmas Songs without beeing bashed too much. Which has to do with the Theme Time Radio, too, I believe.

Back to Down In The Groove:
Sit down and listen to this album once again (preferably to the "original" version) without any prejudice and see what happens.

Enjoy!

Rüdiger


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PostPosted: Tue January 5th, 2010, 15:56 GMT 
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Quote:
Back to Down In The Groove:
Sit down and listen to this album once again (preferably to the "original" version) without any prejudice and see what happens.


I tried to do just that. I didn't make it past When Did You Leave Heaven?
What a horrible cut. I suppose it could have been good, but just listen to it. Try and tap your foot. They set up this ridiculous drum track and started playing the song with the kick on the 2 and the snare on the 3. Then, after the bridge, someone (bob) looses count and I don't where the hell the one is for the rest of the song. They fade the drum track at the end because it sounds so bad.

For an album of covers, "Dylan" blows it away.


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PostPosted: Tue January 5th, 2010, 20:48 GMT 
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Three legged man wrote:
Quote:
Back to Down In The Groove:
Sit down and listen to this album once again (preferably to the "original" version) without any prejudice and see what happens.


I tried to do just that. I didn't make it past When Did You Leave Heaven?
What a horrible cut.
:shock:

Are you trying to give someone a heart attack? This is a Bob Dylan album we're talking about here, not some minor artist. When Did You Leave Heaven? is a wonderful track... sing it to you wife or girlfriend (though I don't advocate doing that at the same time). There's a romantic longing in the song.
Three legged man wrote:
I suppose it could have been good, but just listen to it. Try and tap your foot. They set up this ridiculous drum track and started playing the song with the kick on the 2 and the snare on the 3. Then, after the bridge, someone (bob) looses count and I don't where the hell the one is for the rest of the song. They fade the drum track at the end because it sounds so bad.

For an album of covers, "Dylan" blows it away.
The drum track idiosynchracies... this is what gives the song that charming, edgy, not quite finished feel and is exactly what Bob was after. You noticed, but most people don't. Again, it adds to the charm of the song.


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PostPosted: Tue January 5th, 2010, 21:58 GMT 
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Untrodden Path wrote:
The drum track idiosynchracies... this is what gives the song that charming, edgy, not quite finished feel and is exactly what Bob was after. You noticed, but most people don't. Again, it adds to the charm of the song.


Exactly! Thank you.


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PostPosted: Wed January 6th, 2010, 00:54 GMT 
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The songs are mostly good to great. The performances and arrangements are another matter, but Rank Strangers and Silvio would make a must-have 45 rpm single. Shenandoah is compromised by some kind of synthesizer part, and the girl singers don't do much other than emphasize the incipient weakness in Dylan's voice. The tempo for 90 Miles An Hour is all wrong, and Bob wasn't a capable enough singer even then to pull off When Did You Leave Heaven or Important Words, where he sounds more like he's slumming in a dive bar with a random band after a few drinks. Like many Dylan efforts, the idea surpasses the execution. But it isn't his worst album.


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PostPosted: Wed January 6th, 2010, 01:50 GMT 

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The original 1987 version is a lot more consistent than the album released in 1988, but it's not a good album in either incarnation.
3LM is right about "When Did You Leave Heaven?". It's one of the sloppiest studio recordings ever officially released by a major recording artist.


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