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PostPosted: Sat May 30th, 2015, 03:48 GMT 
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Tommy_ wrote:
This version from 03 is my favorite:

https://youtube.com/watch?list=PL2EF770 ... HuhdgBWvLY


A wonderful version ty.


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PostPosted: Sat May 30th, 2015, 04:33 GMT 
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Dry-ice machines?


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PostPosted: Sat May 30th, 2015, 13:05 GMT 

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I was just watching the "Don't Start me Talkin" from 84 letterman. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ycpYslCn6c

Bob seems shy at the end when Letterman comes up to him, doesn't he? I know he's well known to be an introvert but usually on stage he's the song and dance man. I just thought it was interesting..usually you see Bob on his terms


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PostPosted: Sat May 30th, 2015, 15:28 GMT 
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mogi67 wrote:
I was just watching the "Don't Start me Talkin" from 84 letterman. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ycpYslCn6c

Bob seems shy at the end when Letterman comes up to him, doesn't he? I know he's well known to be an introvert but usually on stage he's the song and dance man. I just thought it was interesting..usually you see Bob on his terms


And things haven't changed in 30 years.


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PostPosted: Sun May 31st, 2015, 12:52 GMT 
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Can anyone help with this question?

I've read that Bob appeared in white face paint in the Rolling Thunder Revue 1975-76), around the time of the Desire album.

Was he associated with masks or face paint on stage around the time of Infidels? (1983)


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PostPosted: Fri May 26th, 2017, 08:49 GMT 

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I think it really is a very special song.

Of course it is in a tradition of visionary songs—a more ethereal Changing of the Guards etc—but it also stands on its own. Like a voice in the wilderness. It’s closest cousins, but far removed, are Tight Connection (possibly underrated) and Someone’s Gotta a Hold of My Heart.

But, truth be told, I can get stuck in this groove. I wish he had done more songs just like this. Otherwordly.


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PostPosted: Fri June 9th, 2017, 05:04 GMT 
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"on a milk-white stead" was lifted from this beautiful, beautiful song - not sure if anybody's picked up on this before, I'm sure they have

it could also be where he got the idea and title for "Girl from the North Country"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6vszJn97UU


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PostPosted: Fri June 9th, 2017, 14:26 GMT 

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mystic garden wrote:
"on a milk-white stead" was lifted from this beautiful, beautiful song - not sure if anybody's picked up on this before, I'm sure they have

it could also be where he got the idea and title for "Girl from the North Country"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6vszJn97UU


"Milk-white steed" is a stock phrase. The old ballads are full of milk-white steeds. It's simply one of the standard descriptions of a horse. In "Blackack Davey," for instance, the boss rides a coal-black stud in the version Dylan sings--but in other versions it's a milk-white steed. Dylan would have heard the phrase countless times, and there's no reason to point to any one song.

I don't see how the idea for "Girl from the North Country" relates to "The Lass from the Low Countree." I guess you could imagine Dylan's song being from the point of view of the lord, who realizes, too late, that he loved the lass, and sends someone to check on her. But the idea is really too basic to pin on any one source.

The title does seem like a definite reference, though--just substitute "Girl" for "Lass" and "North" for "Low." (And in "It Ain't Me Babe" the first line actually quotes another song John Jacob Niles sang--"Go Away from My Window.")


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PostPosted: Sat June 10th, 2017, 08:15 GMT 
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Right, didn't know it was a stock phrase. I know he's a big fan of Niles so I jumped on the idea.

I guess, as he says in his Nobel Lecture, by the time he hit NYC, he had the vernacular down and could invent and twist the phrases as he saw fit, as he still does to this day, but now we get Ovid and magazines.


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PostPosted: Mon June 12th, 2017, 07:28 GMT 
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Jokerman is quite simply a dystopian masterpiece that not only captures but surpasses the enigmatic complexity of Homer's opus, The Odyssey.

The contextual, covertly socio-political undercurrent that brings this work to life suggests that it is not only a masterpiece of lyricism, but more importantly, allows it to stand shoulder to shoulder with the greatest of classical literature ever penned.

One cannot underestimate the vital, artistic relevance of this work... without doubt, Dylan's greatest writing.


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PostPosted: Mon June 12th, 2017, 08:05 GMT 
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planet drop wrote:
Can anyone help with this question?

I've read that Bob appeared in white face paint in the Rolling Thunder Revue 1975-76), around the time of the Desire album.

Was he associated with masks or face paint on stage around the time of Infidels? (1983)

Not to my knowledge. I've never seen a photo of the face paint on stage after RTR


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PostPosted: Tue June 13th, 2017, 05:46 GMT 
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Wasn't make-up still used during the 78 tour?


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PostPosted: Wed November 8th, 2017, 03:35 GMT 
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A poster named chervokas over at the Steve Hoffman forum posted this, I like it a lot:

I've never really been able to fully unwind Jokerman, so I'm curious to hear people's thoughts. The whole Infidels album is such a kaleidoscopic jumble of apocalyptic Judeo-Christian fundamentalism and interpersonal politics and political social commentary, that it's pretty dense. I really have always loved the record because of that...I mean I always love Dylan in his cranky prophet calling down doom mode anyway, so stuff like "License to Kill" is right up my alley....the cranky political stuff like Union Sundown and Neighborhood Bully, is less my cup of tea, but to me the two most mysterious and mystically theological songs are Jokerman and I and I, and frankly, I'd love for someone who has spent time with them (and with the Book of Revelation and any of the other sources of Dylan's cranky fundamentalism) to hold my hand and walk me through 'em. I think Dylan has said of Jokerman that it's one of those songs he kind of lost the thread on or something like that, so maybe we're looking for something more coherent in the song or its central image than he ever felt like he fully achieved.

I feel like the Jokerman of the song, if it's not the singer himself, is humanity itself -- trapped between freedom and truth (Freedom just around the corner for you/But with the truth so far off, what good will it do?), the big truth, the one truth, trying to outrun or escape one's internal sinfulness and conscience ( or, did he mean not conscience but self-hatred when he wrote of keeping one step ahead of the persecutor within, did he really mean persecutor or prosecutor?)

Is the "you" in every verse the same "you," the same Jokerman? Is the morally frail sinner and doer of evil -- the manipulator of crowds -- the same you as the you resting in the fields with the dog licking your face? And is that dream twister actually evil -- that "you" who also is a friend to the martyr and friend to the woman of shame? Maybe I'm just confused but maybe it's actually just not that focused.

One thing I think is clear is that the Jokerman is NOT the baby prince dressed in scarlet -- if that's satan. That creature seizes controls of the priests, pimps children, but he's not the jokerman. The Jokerman knows what Satan wants.....but the Jokerman has no response. That's another reason why the Jokerman seems to me to be more of just kind of humanity hanging in the balance of the reality of man, between freedom and truth, between sin and virtue, between god and satan (the sick and the lame being chased by the rifleman and the preacher, who'll get their first is uncertain) -- in this evil world of sin and temptation and false-hearted secular leaders, with its promises of freedom and pleasure, will you act, can you act, when you act will you do the right thing? I always thought that was kind of the gist of the song.


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