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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 01:10 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 16th, 2008, 21:48 GMT
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The MEZ loves this "classic". Last played in 2008. I think it's quite an underrated hit or classic ,if you will. It has it all In my opinion. Do you like the 60's versions live or the NET, dare I ask? I'd like to hear a post 60's great rendition personally, if anyone has one for The MEZ. Other dates that stand out in your mind? Comments on the song etc etc. This should be played more in recent years no? MEZ


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 02:18 GMT 
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Love love love this song. In my opinion he never recaptured the sound he got on the record. One of the few times I'll put my foot down and say the album version is the definitive version.

I'd love to see he him try it out with a 'Together Through Life' feeling. Sort of a 'This Dream of You' feel to it. I think it would work well with the tex-mex style.

siruso


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 02:31 GMT 
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Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
The context here is the contrast of the frenetic opener (SHSB) to “She Belongs to Me” and how it introduces the hard/soft/hard/soft textural rhythm that ping-pongs through the first five tracks on BIABH. Dylan’s new found surrealism works in both contexts; hard... and soft.

“She can take the dark out of the night time and paint the daytime black.” “She’s a hypnotist collector, you are a walking antique.” “For Halloween get her a trumpet, for Christmas, get a big drum.”

This is essential to understanding Dylan from this point on: it is NOT that these lines don’t “mean anything,” it’s that they don’t mean any ONE thing. It’s what poetry would look like at the quantum level where all solid matter becomes a blur, a vibration. Meaning doesn’t so much disintegrate as it becomes relative, just like Einstein predicted. :D


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 05:19 GMT 
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Long Johnny wrote:
“She can take the dark out of the night time and paint the daytime black.” “She’s a hypnotist collector, you are a walking antique.” “For Halloween get her a trumpet, for Christmas, get a big drum.”


Actually, it's "For Halloween give her a trumpet
And for Christmas, buy her a drum."


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 05:22 GMT 
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Love love love this one. I heard him sing it in 2008 in North Carolina and it was like catching a freight train in the middle of the night and hanging on for dear life. Then I sang it to my daughter on her 21st birthday. I think I agree with you LJ. It means nothing and everything just like real life.


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 05:40 GMT 

Joined: Thu August 30th, 2007, 22:44 GMT
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Nappy wrote:
Long Johnny wrote:
“She can take the dark out of the night time and paint the daytime black.” “She’s a hypnotist collector, you are a walking antique.” “For Halloween get her a trumpet, for Christmas, get a big drum.”


Actually, it's "For Halloween give her a trumpet
And for Christmas, buy her a drum."

On the BIABH version he says "buy her a trumpet" and "get her a big drum." But small variations in phrasing can be found across many versions.

One of my favorite live performances is the one from Stockton '06. Strong, deep singing and a GORGEOUS guitar solo by Denny on that big hollowbody Gibson he used to play.


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 10:50 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 8th, 2007, 19:59 GMT
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That's a fine song, I always liked it. The melody is derived from the one used for "Betty And Dupree", a murder ballad from the 20s that was very popular among the Folk Revivalists.

I agree that in this case there are no live versions surpassing the original.

Nometheless, here's a collection of live performances, all together in one zip-file:
http://www.sendspace.com/file/iwx1fb

- 24.04.1992, Waikiki
- 13.09.1992, Lafayette
- 17.07.2001, Loerrach (decent version with good vocals, but the guitar parts are awful)
- 13.04.2005, Buffalo (with Elana Fremerman on fiddle)
- 16.11.2005, Manchester
- 17.10.2006, San Francisco

I must admit that those two from 1992 now sound very disappointing, the one from 2001 suffers much from Dylan's lead guitar playing and the three from 2005/06 are much better than the rest.


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 12:35 GMT 
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Not as good as Here Comes Santa


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 13:15 GMT 
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Location: Maybe it isn't a tour, maybe he's just lost.
Perhaps a "Santa Belongs To Me" version could be worked out.....


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 13:17 GMT 
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Another one of his poetic masterpieces.


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 14:45 GMT 

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Location: Beside a wild stream
I love this song. . .it always makes me smile.


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 15:02 GMT 
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an unassuming early peak on the wonderful BIABH. i'm unsure whether it's underappreciated, i don't see talk about it enough though. if anything is plodding in the NET it's this song however, the 06-versions are decent sometimes, but earlier attempts are all stillborn and excrutiating.


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 17:11 GMT 
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Always love this song. Thanks for the download, Truth... Another really nice version is the drumless alternate take on Bootleg Series 7.


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PostPosted: Thu September 17th, 2009, 17:29 GMT 
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I & I, more than the open-ended wordplay and who belongs to whom whirls there's such a lovely, devotional feel about the tune itself that can put me in as many moods as the 'simple' words can lead to different interpretations. Or, rather, it's like you always hear it for the first time and wonder how it will end, and it's never resolved.

Dylan said once in an interview that he wanted his music to have the sound of the street. And indeed, it was here circa 64-65 that his music started to have that experienced real-life drama that will make you listen up.


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PostPosted: Fri September 18th, 2009, 04:07 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
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Very well said Effort. i agree, I love the very simple melody here, flowing gracefully like a backwoods stream reflecting the almost real image of the singer's ideal woman. It works beautifully with the playful lyrics. The song is written within a basic blues structure, though one would never know when listening to the album it's played so tenderly. What I love about the song is the singer is never mentioned beyond the title. What I've always assumed is that the bittersweet 'blues' of the song illustrates that she actually doesn't belong to him nor possibly anyone.
i agree the song has been spotty throughout the NET, but I offer one from Hiroshima 1994 (a great year for the song) that cuts to the very heated core of the song. Bob sings the song like his life depends on it. Simply put, it's an epic version. The band is so full of heat, so in tune with Bob's performance and the strength of the melody, one can positively feel the very raw, dirty blues inherent. If you're a Bucky Baxter fan or a Winston admirer, they shine with this one...

Hiroshima Japan
February 16 1994
http://www.sendspace.com/file/1mphpr


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PostPosted: Fri September 18th, 2009, 13:01 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 15th, 2009, 02:35 GMT
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Bow down to her on Sunday,
Salute her when her birthday comes


We always thought this was a barely-coded reference to contemporary America, and that the whole song was a critique of the 'modern' American state. All that saluting of the flag and so on was introduced sometime after the end of WWII, if I have my history right.

But definitely, there are more levels to it than we appreciated at the time.


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PostPosted: Fri September 18th, 2009, 13:13 GMT 

Joined: Wed July 30th, 2008, 01:43 GMT
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There's an idea that I rather like that this gorgeous song is about his step-daughter - and indeed that's Maria and Sara providing handclaps. The whole song seems different if you think that it's addressed to a child, rather than a childlike woman. "She's nobody's child" is nicely ironic rather than patronising. A lot of the surrealism doesn't seem so surreal in light of this - it describes the way a child can seem to adults and the way adults have to go down to a child's level - "wind up peeking through her keyhole down upon your knees" "bow down to her on Sunday ..." - and proffer gifts. It's pretty touching that Dylan's claiming "She Belongs to Me".


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PostPosted: Fri September 18th, 2009, 13:40 GMT 
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I like this song. It is one early Dylan song I like a lot. I don't know what it means, but it reminds me of my wife, in a good way. There is something about the beat of the musical accompaniment that I find very erotic. It is like the gyrations of a woman that occur during a particular type of act. This complements the words, which remind me of my wife, and the whole thing ends up being an enjoyable image provoking song.


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PostPosted: Fri September 18th, 2009, 13:52 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 15th, 2009, 02:35 GMT
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She never stumbles, she got no place to fall
She's nobody's child, the law can't touch her at all


The military-industrial state of America is above the law. Therefore cannot do wrong.

She wears an Egyptian ring that sparkles before she speaks
She's a hypnotist collector, you are a walking antique


America bedazzles you with tricks and you follow her orders blindly.

You will start out standing, proud to steal her anything she sees,
But you wander [want her?] peeking through a keyhole down upon your knees


Off you go on foreign ventures, "stealing" other countries' goodies.

Sorry to get controversial on this topic, but I think the song had quite radical connotations throughout the 60s. The whole American critique thing was way more significant at the time. I don't think you should neglect that angle, though I do think there is much more to the song than politics.


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PostPosted: Fri September 18th, 2009, 14:02 GMT 
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Those are some clever readings of the song, I don't buy any of it though. This song is not about politics. I think it is a guy singing about a girl he is fascinated with.


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PostPosted: Fri September 18th, 2009, 15:29 GMT 
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I'm sorry, I was out. I was thinking about this song and left for a few minutes. Did I miss anything?


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PostPosted: Sat September 19th, 2009, 12:49 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 15th, 2009, 02:35 GMT
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carnap wrote:
Those are some clever readings of the song, I don't buy any of it though. This song is not about politics. I think it is a guy singing about a girl he is fascinated with.

Could be. I'm only saying what was a popular interpretation at the time. It does follow SHB, "20 years of schooling and they put you on the day shift," and come before MF "the National Guard stands around his door" and later on the same side, "He said his name was Columbus, and I just said 'Good luck'". And then there's It's Alright [sic] Ma, whatever that's about.

And it's not as if Bob was a stranger to political songs.


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PostPosted: Sun September 20th, 2009, 07:56 GMT 

Joined: Wed April 11th, 2007, 04:15 GMT
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Very interesting thoughts UnwavedHand. I had never heard of that nor interpreted it that way before, but it does kinda make sense in a way. It also really thickens the atmosphere of that Hiroshima performance i posted.
Anyway thanks for the insight.


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PostPosted: Sun September 20th, 2009, 09:47 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 8th, 2007, 19:59 GMT
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I can't agree with any political interpretations. Please note, that this song is in no way critical. I only hear ironic admiration, someone is proud that "she belongs to me". If there is a political "sub-text" and it's about the USA in general then it would be the smartest patriotic song ever.

But maybe it is. "She Belongs To Me" was the standard opening song in 1966. In Paris he put a great American flag on the stage. Just imagine Bob Dylan there in front of the flag and singing:"Bow down to her on sunday/salute her when her birthday comes".


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PostPosted: Sun September 20th, 2009, 14:48 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 15th, 2009, 02:35 GMT
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Yes, TruthIsObscure, I was thinking about that US flag performance and the song's title, both of which seem to run counter to a US critique interpretation. Dunno about the flag, but I think many people in Europe (or UK, anyway) were regarding criticism of US foreign policy (and certain other aspects of US society) to imply a general rejection of everything the US stands for. That would have pissed him off, since his whole thing is the US people's music.

As for the title, it doesn't gell with the song's lyrics at all. They portray an aloof, self-sufficient, somewhat controlling person who seems to be using people. She wouldn't belong to anybody. Unless he's showing off (and guess what - she's my girlfriend, folks!), which sounds out of character. More likely he's doing one of his famous reversals, you know I was so much older then, the first one now shall later be last, and so on, but my guess is as good as yours.

But "steal", and "bow down to her" and "salute her"; you need to explain those words. And also, who is "you"? You start out standing, proud to steal her anything she sees. . . you are a walking antique. A simple 'portrait' interpretation won't work.


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