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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2016, 17:15 GMT 
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The Bard wrote:
pol2jem wrote:
Quite apart from wishing for an anthology of all Roy Kelly's contributions to The Telegraph, The Bridge, On The Tracks and any other publications I may have missed down the years, I think it would be wonderful and apposite for the late, great John Bauldie's "The Ghost of Electricity" to be reprinted next year. My own dog-eared copy was left inadvertently in a Houston hotel room in 1993 and never replaced.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ghost-Electrici ... lectricity


Amen - I lost mine when I moved to Asia, many moons ago. 50 years on from 1966 would seem to be the perfect time, but who would be able to sanction and effect it now ?



...and also 20 years on from John's untimely death. Unfortunately, my several recent efforts to locate the current administrator of John's literary estate have been fruitless.


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PostPosted: Sun January 3rd, 2016, 17:26 GMT 
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pol2jem wrote:
Quite apart from wishing for an anthology of all Roy Kelly's contributions to The Telegraph, The Bridge, On The Tracks and any other publications I may have missed down the years, I think it would be wonderful and apposite for the late, great John Bauldie's "The Ghost of Electricity" to be reprinted next year. My own dog-eared copy was left inadvertently in a Houston hotel room in 1993 and never replaced.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ghost-Electrici ... lectricity


Yes Please!


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PostPosted: Tue April 19th, 2016, 10:18 GMT 
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pol2jem wrote:
Quite apart from wishing for an anthology of all Roy Kelly's contributions to The Telegraph, The Bridge, On The Tracks and any other publications I may have missed down the years, I think it would be wonderful and apposite for the late, great John Bauldie's "The Ghost of Electricity" to be reprinted next year. My own dog-eared copy was left inadvertently in a Houston hotel room in 1993 and never replaced.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ghost-Electrici ... lectricity


"This year sees the twentieth anniversary of the sudden death of our friend John Bauldie. John’s work on The Telegraph has never been surpassed and our work together with him on that magazine was the spur to create and continue with The Bridge. One of John’s seminal works was The Ghost Of Electricity and, given that this year is also the fiftieth anniversary of the 1966 world tour which that book documents, we have teamed up with John’s very good friend Bill Allison to produce a reprint of that book. It is more than a reprint as it will contain a whole set of unseen photographs from the tour and an updated chronology. More details on this publication can be found later in this issue."

That was cut n pasted from The Bridge website in the piece on the front page today. I dont have the copy itself, so I dont know what "details" are inside ...
Sounds promising though...


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PostPosted: Tue April 19th, 2016, 10:22 GMT 
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^
I just looked it up in my copy that arrived yesterday. It will be privately published through The Bridge's subscription list.


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PostPosted: Tue April 19th, 2016, 13:44 GMT 
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Oh man, I'm gonna have to get my hands on a copy of this new edition when it comes out(as long as the price isn't obscene).

But I'm not a member of The Bridge. :(

Keep us up to date on the developments with this. Very exciting indeed.


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PostPosted: Tue April 19th, 2016, 13:47 GMT 
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Contact The Bridge's editors via the email address on their website to inquire about the book. They accept reservations, but it's not clear if it is subscribers only.


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PostPosted: Wed April 20th, 2016, 21:10 GMT 
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Johanna Parker wrote:
Contact The Bridge's editors via the email address on their website to inquire about the book. They accept reservations, but it's not clear if it is subscribers only.


Did it, and am now on the reserve list. :mrgreen:

I cannot wait to finally be able to read this legendary book.

I thought the day might never come.


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PostPosted: Thu April 21st, 2016, 03:16 GMT 
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Illy Dylan wrote:

I cannot wait to finally be able to read this legendary book.

I thought the day might never come.


Exactly!
Me too. Very happy about this. I always loved JB's take on Bob. Such a sad loss.


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PostPosted: Thu April 21st, 2016, 12:39 GMT 

Joined: Sat August 25th, 2007, 21:54 GMT
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Wald's book supplied some interesting background and I believe he was Van Ronk's co-author for Mayor of McDougall Street. Hajdu's book on the Baez sisters and their boyfriends is worth a look. I'm still working my way through Epstein and Ricks but those are both promising. Scaduto is a must read because he could speak with the freshly wounded.

I think I may need to revisit some of the minor 19th century poets, too. Or even major ones like Tennyson.


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PostPosted: Tue May 10th, 2016, 15:43 GMT 

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monklover wrote:
Wald's book supplied some interesting background and I believe he was Van Ronk's co-author for Mayor of McDougall Street. Hajdu's book on the Baez sisters and their boyfriends is worth a look. I'm still working my way through Epstein and Ricks but those are both promising. Scaduto is a must read because he could speak with the freshly wounded.

I think I may need to revisit some of the minor 19th century poets, too. Or even major ones like Tennyson.


Ricks is wonderful on Tennyson, too, happily enough.


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PostPosted: Thu May 12th, 2016, 02:29 GMT 

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Queen of Spades wrote:
When my uncle died, I found this book in his bedroom. I like it a lot.

Image

He also had a newspaper clipping in the book from March 22, 1991 about Emilia Caruana who was awarded $100 thousand because a newspaper article depicted her as being Bob's sex slave.


Who is Emilia Caruana and what does she have to do with Dylan, if anything? Never heard this name before. She is not mentioned in Scaduto.


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PostPosted: Thu May 12th, 2016, 03:17 GMT 

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A google search resulted in this:

http://www.expectingrain.com/dok/who/g/gypsyfire.html

So never mind. Sorry I asked.


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PostPosted: Fri May 13th, 2016, 11:01 GMT 
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Johanna Parker wrote:
Contact The Bridge's editors via the email address on their website to inquire about the book. They accept reservations, but it's not clear if it is subscribers only.



John Wraith tells me that it will be made available to civilians as well as The Bridge subscribers.


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PostPosted: Sat May 14th, 2016, 01:23 GMT 

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pol2jem wrote:
Quite apart from wishing for an anthology of all Roy Kelly's contributions to The Telegraph, The Bridge, On The Tracks and any other publications I may have missed down the years, I think it would be wonderful and apposite for the late, great John Bauldie's "The Ghost of Electricity" to be reprinted next year. My own dog-eared copy was left inadvertently in a Houston hotel room in 1993 and never replaced.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ghost-Electrici ... lectricity


Jesus. Are you serious? Kelly? He's the reason I dropped my sub to The Bridge. If I want to read about people making fun of Dylan I'll read YouTube comments and save myself the dough.

An insufferable bore of the highest order.


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PostPosted: Fri October 7th, 2016, 12:29 GMT 
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I'm very interested in Invisible Now by John Hughes.


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PostPosted: Fri October 7th, 2016, 13:08 GMT 

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Chronicles, that's clear. And best of Dylanologists: "Stimmen aus der Unterwelt" by Heinrich Detering. He shows Bobs poetry amidst Homer, Ovid, Petrarca, Shakespeare and Brecht. Very noble!


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PostPosted: Fri October 7th, 2016, 16:50 GMT 
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rimbaud wrote:
pol2jem wrote:
Quite apart from wishing for an anthology of all Roy Kelly's contributions to The Telegraph, The Bridge, On The Tracks and any other publications I may have missed down the years, I think it would be wonderful and apposite for the late, great John Bauldie's "The Ghost of Electricity" to be reprinted next year. My own dog-eared copy was left inadvertently in a Houston hotel room in 1993 and never replaced.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ghost-Electrici ... lectricity


Jesus. Are you serious? Kelly? He's the reason I dropped my sub to The Bridge. If I want to read about people making fun of Dylan I'll read YouTube comments and save myself the dough.

An insufferable bore of the highest order.


Perhaps insufferable bores of and from a certain age have to stick together. I dropped my subscription to The Bridge because there wasn't enough by Roy Kelly. I thought his long piece in Telegraph #55, "Now And Again: The Ballad Of A Then Man, A Virtual Truth" was a delightful, entertaining and heartfelt exploration of fandom by a person just a few years younger than Bob himself. On the other hand, apparently earnest analytical pieces such as "Humanity In The Gang Bang Mood: A Celebration of Chaos" by Robin Whitting, in The Bridge #36, encourage heaviness in my eyelids.

Horses for courses, I suppose.


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PostPosted: Mon October 10th, 2016, 20:26 GMT 
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I enjoyed, and found credible, this; Refractions of Bob Dylan, edited by Eugen Banauch (Manchester University Press):

https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/ ... sc=y&hl=en

It's about the cultural construction and appropriation of the persona/personae known as "Bob Dylan," not only by "Bob" himself, but also by all those others who participate in this creative act.

On the "production" side there is the man himself (always metaphorically "behind the shades"), his "people" (his family, friends, band(s), entourage, sound technicians, publicity and commercial enterprises, record company, and so on) but equally important is the "reception" side, which is not a passive body of "consumers" but a proactive and dynamic set of actors and processes which actively assist in the fabrication of the phenomenon of "Bob" (you and me !)

This sort of theoretical framework for comprehending Dylan is given support empirically by, for example, evidence that his reception has been quite different in different countries and cultures, at different times, sometimes to the extent that his developmental artistic phases and changes have occurred in different temporal order in different communities. Much reference is made to Todd Haynes's film about our hero, "I'm Not There." In a real sense, the thesis of the book is that he isn't (although of course on other senses, he is !) As the man himself sang, " ... I'm not there, I'm gone."

It's this possibility, that "Bob" (the public "Bob(s)") is as much a communal projection as an individual personality projecting it's own persona(e), that makes Bob Dylan endlessly fascinating, to me.

Ultimately, he seems unknowable, but whoever he is he's such a richly creative artist, whom we're so fortunate to share our lifetimes with, that he repays the attempt to know him, manifold.


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PostPosted: Thu October 13th, 2016, 18:26 GMT 

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I came on the site today, this day of days, Dylan-wise, and browsing this thread was thrilled to see someone saying they were interested in my book, Invisible Now, and it made my day (my week actually). I feel the book has suffered a bit from first being priced at 55 and then up to 100 pounds, but I can say that the paperback is going to come out before too long, at around 19.99...

John


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PostPosted: Thu October 13th, 2016, 18:32 GMT 

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On the topic of this thread, I have a long time attachment to Scaduto's book, because it was the first book I ever read on Dylan, and I swear after reading it I felt I could remember it all! And I do think Mark Polizzotti's book on Highway 61 is so well written. Marcus is hit and miss, but when he hits. And I like the Epstein a lot, for the feel of it. Lots of good books, and so little time! The Dave Van Ronk book is fab too, and Chris Lee's book about the Free Trade Hall is unlike anything else.


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PostPosted: Fri October 14th, 2016, 23:48 GMT 
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Sorry if was already discussed, but is Greil Marcus' book Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at a Crossroads good? I just picked it up at local bookstore


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PostPosted: Sun October 8th, 2017, 05:02 GMT 
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Robert Shelton's No Direction Home vs. Howard Sounes Down the Highway. Two books enter... one book leaves. A battle to the death. Da-da-dum!

What I'm saying is: Which of these two is better?


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PostPosted: Sun October 8th, 2017, 11:15 GMT 

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Anr Bjotk wrote:
Robert Shelton's No Direction Home vs. Howard Sounes Down the Highway. Two books enter... one book leaves. A battle to the death. Da-da-dum!

What I'm saying is: Which of these two is better?


Which is better for someone who wants to read a few books about Dylan? Robert Shelton's book is not the best written, it fades away after 1966, but for the five years before that, he was there and his book has a certain immediacy as a result. Whereas what USPs does Sounes's book have? It contained some revelations when it was published which are now old hat. He's probably got more idea how to craft a biography than Shelton had, but I'd vote Shelton. But then I'm an old fogey for whom 61-66 is the most interesting period.


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PostPosted: Sun October 8th, 2017, 14:46 GMT 

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tyke wrote:
Anr Bjotk wrote:
Robert Shelton's No Direction Home vs. Howard Sounes Down the Highway. Two books enter... one book leaves. A battle to the death. Da-da-dum!

What I'm saying is: Which of these two is better?


Which is better for someone who wants to read a few books about Dylan? Robert Shelton's book is not the best written, it fades away after 1966, but for the five years before that, he was there and his book has a certain immediacy as a result. Whereas what USPs does Sounes's book have? It contained some revelations when it was published which are now old hat. He's probably got more idea how to craft a biography than Shelton had, but I'd vote Shelton. But then I'm an old fogey for whom 61-66 is the most interesting period.


There is no comparison whatsoever: Shelton's book has stood the test of time and remains the best biography, by far; the Sounes book is of course much more recent, but it cannot hold a candle to Shelton's.


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PostPosted: Mon October 9th, 2017, 05:13 GMT 
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FieldingMellish wrote:

There is no comparison whatsoever: Shelton's book has stood the test of time and remains the best biography, by far; the Sounes book is of course much more recent, but it cannot hold a candle to Shelton's.


How far does Shelton's book go though? And how would you compare Shelton and Ian Bell's books?


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