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 Post subject: Uncut CD
PostPosted: Sun December 19th, 2004, 09:18 GMT 

Joined: Sun December 12th, 2004, 09:01 GMT
Posts: 92
Location: Dresden, Germany
So i got the Dylan Uncut issue yesterday and am totally smitten with the CD 'Tracks that influenced Bob Dylan' that came with it. I knew most of the songs but it's great to have them on one CD. Here's the track listing:

1 Bert Jansch - Nottamun Town
2 Mississippi Sheiks - The world is going wrong
3 Woody - Talkin' dust bowl Blues
4 Martin Carthy - Lord Franklin
5 Chuck Berry - Too much monkey business
6 Lightnin' Hopkins - Automobile
7 Hank Williams - Lost Highway
8 Blind Willie McTell - Delia
9 Gene Vincent - Baby Blue
10 Josh White - House of the rising sun
11 Louis Armstrong - St. James Infirmary
12 Jimmie Rodgers - My blue eyed Jane
13 Blind Lemmon Jefferson - See that my grave is kept clean
14 Nic Jones - Canadee-i-o
15 Robert Johnson - Come on in my kitchen
16 Dubliners - The Patriot Game

Uncut tries to cash in with a twin issue (they did this before) with a different cover and CD ('Tracks inspired by BD'). Althogh i haven't heard the other CD it seems to me that the one i have is the better deal. I hate the Dubliners, but everything else i like a great deal.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun December 19th, 2004, 19:23 GMT 
Yea i got that copie to i think we did get the best deal. :D :D

One question, all the people on the cd. Are those the other people other

dylan fans are listening too?

should i be getting some of there stuff?

I'v got quite a bit of Woody Guithry cose i like his stuff. :D :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun December 19th, 2004, 20:56 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 7th, 2004, 23:02 GMT
Posts: 408
I'm convinced Willie McTell is among Dylan's favourite bluesmen as he is by far the most literate and lyrically agile.

The early recordings in particular - Mama 'Taint Long Fo' Day, Statesboro Blues etc - are fantastic. Blues couplets, much like haikus, are deceptively simple - so uncomplicated until you actually try to write one. McTell was the master. I'm not sure i agree no one could sing the blues like McTell, but sure as hell no one could write it like him. His voice is unusually sweet and clean (especially given how he sings of cigarettes being his ruin and whisky being his crave), smooth Southern Comfort to the harsh bourbon of his counterparts in the Mississippi Delta, and his location in Georgia (to the south and east of most blues of the 1920s and 30s) contributes to a unique and memorable experience. He is different, he stands out and it's easy to see why dylan loves him. The best place to start is JSP records, who offer a comprehensive 4 disc look at his early career, though there are less daunting budget single discs available.

Hank Williams sings the saddest songs you have ever heard. You must hear some more of this stuff. Oddly, novelty songs and throwaway crap seems to be a country institution and even Hank didn't escape this, therefore his back catalogue is huge and infuriatingly hit-and-miss - this is the best collection i have heard http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASI ... 07-8299611

You can pick up Robert Johnson's complete 29 sides for less than a fiver. People who don't know what they are talking about call him the founder of the blues, others who know less dismiss him simply because he wasn't the first. Mark my words, he was great. Yes, he took wholesale from those who went before (there's a fascinating collection available on indigo records that traces both johnson's influences and those he influenced, through johnson's own recordings, over 3 cds), but i defy anyone to show me a bluesman who didn't. His back catalogue, brief as it is, is the most perfect in the blues.

Jimmie Rodgers is perfect example of why country music is referred to as 'white man's blues'. The soul, hurt and distance in every lonesome old yodel is incalcuable. When Dylan asked Jewel if she'd heard of the Blue Yodeller she said he sounded like a superhero. Dylan's response: 'he is'. Couldn't put it better.

Lemon Jefferson is a great songwriter and the natural bridge between blues and rock n roll - he was a direct influence on the works of elvis and carl perkins - but i find him quite difficult to get into. His work was almost entirely on unaccompanied guitar, his voice was never the most startling, and the recordings (on paramount, notorious for their poor recording technique) are less than inviting, especially given their age. He is undoubtedly great, but if you wish to get into early blues and american folk music there are easier gateways in my opinion.

others that should have been mentioned.

Dylan only seems to write songs about (or 'for') great bluesmen, and in my opinion Charley Patton was the greatest of them all. The gut-wrenching power in his voice needs to be heard to be believed. It's never about the lyrics - half the time it's difficult to make them out - but the raw emotion and soul that tells of a thousand wrongs. High Water is based around Patton's High Water Everywhere (in two parts), during which you can hear the great man almost slam his foot through the recording studio floor, visualisie him choking on his own bile, struggling to catch his own breath. This is the blues. His work with Henry Sims on violin is very underrated as well.

Memphis Minnie's country blues, acoustic material with kansas joe mccoy and others often becomes repetitive and is best heard in small doses, but her later electric sides were truly groundbreaking, helping usher in rock n roll. Obviously 5 Believers is a wholesale lift of Minnie's 'Me and My Chauffeur Blues'.

the carter family - woody guthrie took from the carter songbook in much the same way dylan took from his. The cornerstone of american song, probably the most important 'group' in the history of popular music, the carters learnt songs in the areas around appalachia on 'song-finding' missions and recorded them with lush harmonies and in a guitar style (picking of the bass strings, strumming the rest) which immediately preceded bluegrass. Immeasurably important and, unlike most on this list it must be said, immediately and timelessly listenable.

probably not everyone's pick, though im certain they influenced dylan, are gus cannon and his jug stompers. Yeah, it's jug band music and therefore gets somewhat dismissed as being a throwaway relic of the medicine show tradition, but anyone who dismisses it as such is missing out on the most innovative music of the 1920s. Cannon sought the killer groove on Po' Boy Blues, so found it by turning to slide(!) banjo; the result is without doubt one of the most insanely addictive riffs committed to record. Noah Lewis, excessive to the end and probably the greatest harmonica players to have ever lived, decided to play two simultaneously - one through his mouth and the other through his nose! An infectious, wryly intelligent, riotous scream from start to finish. A personal favourite. The Jug Stompers recorded the definitive early versions of Viola Lee Blues and Minglewood Blues, which dylan has been known to cover.

Noah Lewis, along with Yank Rachel, also contributed to Sleepy John Estes' early tracks, which are well worthy of investigation, if only for the piano driven sides such as Expressman Blues.

Finally, Rosetta Tharpe played and wrote magnificent gospel music, with the refrain on This Train ('this train don't pull no gamblers/.../no midnight ramblers') being notably used by dylan on tryin' to get to heaven.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun December 19th, 2004, 21:01 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 7th, 2004, 23:02 GMT
Posts: 408
oh, and if you can afford it, this set is probably the best thing you'll ever buy :)

Image


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon December 20th, 2004, 00:20 GMT 
Aaaa i belive that is the American Folk antholgy,

I'v heard thats an amazing record/s.

Thankyou for allthe info above!!!!!! :D :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon December 20th, 2004, 05:34 GMT 

Joined: Sun December 12th, 2004, 09:01 GMT
Posts: 92
Location: Dresden, Germany
Great post ross! I think most Bob Dylan fans have some sort of connection to american roots music, blues, hillbilly, bluegrass and gospel. What i like about the Uncut CD is that it, being from England, also takes the British ballad as an important infuence into account.
I believe Bob paid tribute to his influences throughout his whole career, much more so than the Beatles or Stones. He is such a great bluesmen. The question isn't if Bob is the best white blues singer, but how far up he is among bluesmen in general.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon December 20th, 2004, 10:50 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 7th, 2004, 23:02 GMT
Posts: 408
Quote:
He is such a great bluesmen.


couldn't put it better.

also missed out some early bluegrass. Dylan is on record as being highly partial to Bill Monroe & His Bluegrass Boys, though i prefer the later Stanley Brothers recordings both are pure as appalachian snow, a must for any collection.

More contemporary, but linked nonetheless, if anyone likes this kind of bluegrass checking out Gillian Welch & Dave Rawlings would be a good move. They also do a rather spectacular live cover of Billy 4.

As for the connection to american roots, bob is entirely responsible for my love of all things american folk.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon December 20th, 2004, 20:37 GMT 
Same here i wouldn't have looked twise at american folk music if it weren't for bob.

But even tho i'm English i still can't stand English folk music.
I just prefer the american stuff, its more interesting in my opinon.
:D :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon December 20th, 2004, 23:36 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 7th, 2004, 23:02 GMT
Posts: 408
I'm not averse to it, just utterly ignorant of British folk in its pure form. Something id probably like to rectify, but have no idea where to start.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon December 20th, 2004, 23:44 GMT 

Joined: Wed December 15th, 2004, 23:40 GMT
Posts: 39
Location: England
HI Ross'
'Liege @ Lief' by Fairport Convention is as good a place as anywhere.
Don


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon December 20th, 2004, 23:49 GMT 
I just can't stand the sound of English Folk music it just lacks something, that the American folk music has.
I feel slightly bad saying that cose i'm English but i'll get over it. :D

How much is the American Folk anthoygy record?
Can you get it on CD?
:D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue December 21st, 2004, 16:40 GMT 

Joined: Sun December 12th, 2004, 09:01 GMT
Posts: 92
Location: Dresden, Germany
Dylan's Angel you shouldn't be so hard on your own people's music. Remenber, that many american ballads are based on british ones. What i like much better about american folk records is that with certain performers (most notably Dylan) it has a rawness and edge to it most british bands lack. But i don't think that has to do with the songs themselves but with the performance/production. British folk-rock mostly has a certain sweetness to it that annoys me at times (Fotheringay, Fairport Convention, Steeleye Span etc.)
I wish the Pogues would have done more traditional material during their hayday!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue December 21st, 2004, 18:44 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 7th, 2004, 23:02 GMT
Posts: 408
Quote:
How much is the American Folk anthoygy record?
Can you get it on CD?


it is on cd, but costs about £70. Not sure i spent that much, but it does cost :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue December 21st, 2004, 21:01 GMT 
Do you have a set list of whats on the CD?
:D :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue December 21st, 2004, 21:03 GMT 
Wayfaring Stranger wrote:
Dylan's Angel you shouldn't be so hard on your own people's music. Remenber, that many american ballads are based on british ones. What i like much better about american folk records is that with certain performers (most notably Dylan) it has a rawness and edge to it most british bands lack. But i don't think that has to do with the songs themselves but with the performance/production. British folk-rock mostly has a certain sweetness to it that annoys me at times (Fotheringay, Fairport Convention, Steeleye Span etc.)
I wish the Pogues would have done more traditional material during their hayday!


Thats just how i feel, i'm not saying there bad its just what i prefer to listen to. :D :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue December 21st, 2004, 22:07 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 7th, 2004, 23:02 GMT
Posts: 408
Don Balby wrote:
HI Ross'
'Liege @ Lief' by Fairport Convention is as good a place as anywhere.
Don


Thanks :)

Dylan's Angel - http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASI ... 07-8299611


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue December 21st, 2004, 23:55 GMT 
Thankyou ross. :D :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed December 22nd, 2004, 00:14 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun November 28th, 2004, 02:57 GMT
Posts: 869
Location: I think I'll call it America
Ross is da man. If I may add two words to the mouth of anyone interested in American folk music: Yazoo Records.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed December 22nd, 2004, 00:18 GMT 
But dose every thing one it sound like the Carter family?

Cose i'm not that into them.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed December 22nd, 2004, 00:28 GMT 
Its just i don't want to be just throwing away my money.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed December 22nd, 2004, 13:33 GMT 
Titanium Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue November 9th, 2004, 21:09 GMT
Posts: 6343
Location: Whorehouse in Buenos Aires
Don't forget THe River is Wide, which Bob did w/Joan, traditional english folk song. And yes, too bad the Pogues did not do more traditional stuff, I am sure they would have done it justice.

BTE, Dylan Angel, you crack me up.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed December 22nd, 2004, 17:51 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 7th, 2004, 23:02 GMT
Posts: 408
Dylan's Angel wrote:
But dose every thing one it sound like the Carter family?

Cose i'm not that into them.


most of it sounds nothing like the carter family, though i adore their early records.

if you have that money, you would not be wasting it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed December 22nd, 2004, 17:52 GMT 

Joined: Sun November 7th, 2004, 23:02 GMT
Posts: 408
the two stoneman family records on there are inherently carter-esque. That's about it, apart from the two or three carter tracks, obviously.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed December 22nd, 2004, 18:49 GMT 
Well i'm gonna see what money i get for christmas and then i'm gonna start saving up for it. :D :D


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 Post subject: anthology
PostPosted: Sat January 1st, 2005, 04:55 GMT 
Here are the tracks on Harry Smith's anthology:

1. Henry Lee - Dick Justice
2. Fatal Flower Garden - Nelstone's Hawaiians
3. House Carpenter - Clarence Ashley
4. Drunkard's Special - Coley Jones
5. Old Lady and the Devil - Bill & Belle Reed
6. Butcher's Boy (The Railroad Boy) - Buell Kazee
7. Wagoner's Lad [Loving Nancy] - Buell Kazee
8. King Kong Kitchie Kitchie Ki-Me-O - Chubby Parker
9. Old Shoes and Leggins - Uncle Eck Dunford
10. Willie Moore - Richard Burnett
11. Lazy Farmer Boy - Buster Carter
12. Peg and Awl - The Carolina Tar Heels
13. Omie Wise - G.B. Grayson
14. My Name Is John Johanna - Kelly Harrell
1. Bandit Cole Younger - Edward L. Crain
2. Charles Giteaux - Kelly Harrell
3. John Hardy Was a Desperate Little Man - The Carter Family
4. Gonna Die With My Hammer in My Hand - Curry
5. Stackalee - Frank Hutchison
6. White House Blues - North Carolina Ramblers
7. Frankie - Mississippi John Hurt
8. When That Great Ship Went Down - Versey Smith
9. Engine 143 - The Carter Family
10. Kassie Jones - Furry Lewis
11. Down on Penny's Farm - The Bently Boys
12. Mississippi Boweavil Blues - Masked Marvels
13. Got the Farm Land Blues - The Carolina Tar Heels
1. Sail Away Ladies [Fiddle Solo] - Uncle Bunt Stephens
2. Wild Wagoner [Frolic Tune] - Jilson Setters
3. Wake up Jacob - Prince Albert Hunt's Texas Ramblers
4. Danseuse [The Dancer] - Blind Uncle Gaspard
5. Georgia Stomp - Andrew & Jim Baxter
6. Brilliancy Medley - Eck Robertson
7. Indian War Whoop [Country Dance] - Hoyt Ming and His Pep Steppers
8. Old Country Stomp - Henry Thomas
9. Old Dog Blue - Jim Jackson
10. Saut' Crapaud [Jump, Frog] - Columbus Frugé
11. Arcadian One-Step - Joseph Falcon
12. Home Sweet Home - The Breaux Fréres
13. Newport Blues - Cincinnati Jug Band
14. Moonshiner's Dance (Pt. 1) - Frank Cloutier
1. You Must Be Born Again - Reverend J.M. Gates
2. Oh Death, Where Is Thy Sting - Reverend J.M. Gates
3. Rocky Road - Alabama Sacred Harp Singers
4. Present Joys - Alabama Sacred Harp Singers
5. This Song of Love - Middle George Singing Convention
6. Judgement - Rev. Sister Mary M. Nelson
7. He Got Better Things for You - Memphis Sanctified Singers
8. Since I Laid My Burden Down
9. John the Baptist [Singing Sermon] - Rev. Moses Mason
10. Dry Bones - Bascom Lamar Lunsford
11. John the Revelator - Blind Willie Johnson
12. Little Moses - The Carter Family
13. Shine on Me - Ernest Phipps
14. Fifty Miles of Elbow Room - Rev. F.W. McGee
15. I'm in the Battlefield for My Lord - Rev. D.C. Rice & His Sanctified Congregation
1. Cuckoo - Clarence Ashley
2. East Virginia - Buell Kazee
3. Minglewood Blues - Cannon's Jug Stompers
4. I Woke up One Morning in May - Didier Hébert
5. James Alley Blues - Richard Rabbit Brown
6. Sugar Baby - Dock Boggs
7. I Wish I Was a Mole in the Ground - Bascom Lamar Lunsford
8. Mountaineer's Courtship - Ernest V. Stoneman
9. Spanish Merchant's Daughter - The Stoneman Family
10. Bob Lee Junior Blues - Memphis Jug Band
11. Single Girl, Married Girl - The Carter Family
12. Vieux Soulard et Sa Femme [The Old Drunkard and His Wife] - Cleoma Breaux
13. Rabbit Foot Blues - Blind Lemon Jefferson
14. Expressman Blues - Sleepy John Estes
1. Poor Boy Blues - Ramblin' Thomas
2. Feather Bed - Cannon's Jug Stompers
3. Country Blues - Dock Boggs
4. 99 Years Blues - Julius Daniels
5. Prison Cell Blues - Blind Lemon Jefferson
6. See That My Grave Is Kept Clean - Blind Lemon Jefferson
7. C'Est Si Triste Sans Lui [It Is So Blue Without Him] - Cleoma Breaux
8. Way Down the Old Plank Road - Uncle Dave Macon
9. Buddy Won't You Roll Down the Line - Uncle Dave Macon
10. Spike Driver Blues - Mississippi John Hurt
11. K.C. Moan - Memphis Jug Band
12. Train on the Island - J.P. Nestor
13. Lone Star Trail - Ken Maynard
14. Fishing Blues - Henry Thomas

You don't have to pay 70 GBP for it--on amazon.com it only costs $65-$78 dollars. Amazon also has samples you can listen to. Be warned, however, that it's full of songs that started out as English folk songs (especially Clarence Ashley's numbers). The song "Butcher's Boy" even has the line "There is a place in London town..."


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