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PostPosted: Wed May 16th, 2007, 00:29 GMT 

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I think calling this album easy listening country misses what the album is doing. Bob was using his country heroes for inspiration and then almost creating his own musical genre. In terms of chord structure and arrangement (particularly in the use of organ and percussion) there really are no country precedents for songs like Lay Lady Lay, I Threw It All Away, and Tell Me It Isn't True. That's why the album still sounds fresh today. But as usual, the album is demoted to minor status by most Dylanphiles because it doesn't have much in the way of semi-abstract Beat-inspired lyrics, which most Dylanphiles seem overly fond of.


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PostPosted: Wed May 16th, 2007, 10:01 GMT 
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LittleFishes wrote:
In terms of chord structure and arrangement (particularly in the use of organ and percussion) there really are no country precedents for songs like Lay Lady Lay, I Threw It All Away, and Tell Me It Isn't True.


I love them as tunes, regular favourites of mine to play and sing myself.

Can I say that I think that the album versions tend to drag a little? Lay lady lay on Before the flood is certainly a more raucous rendition without the intimacy of the '69 cut but still has a better momentum, I think.


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 Post subject: Little Fishes is right
PostPosted: Wed May 16th, 2007, 11:35 GMT 
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LittleFishes wrote:
In terms of chord structure and arrangement (particularly in the use of organ and percussion) there really are no country precedents for songs like Lay Lady Lay, I Threw It All Away, and Tell Me It Isn't True. That's why the album still sounds fresh today. But as usual, the album is demoted to minor status by most Dylanphiles because it doesn't have much in the way of semi-abstract Beat-inspired lyrics, which most Dylanphiles seem overly fond of.


Actually, I found I completely disagree with most of what LittleFishes has been posting on this site, but I have to concede that you are right on the money with this comment. I was a little too harsh on Nashville Skyline back on Page one of this thread; I returned to it over the past few days and it's pretty good. But the best point here is that it's a very musical album. I think it's pretty clear that Dylan was trying to bypass the "rock intelligentsia" with this one. It's more an album for musicians and for down-home, everyman type of fans.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue March 17th, 2009, 03:49 GMT 

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DanParis wrote:
I think this is an album that wouldn't even be known if it wasn't by Dylan.

Not to say that it's bad, but it's not good either.



I could not disagree with this more. If this were a new artist who released the album and then continued in the same vein and released albums of similar quality they would be one of most revered country artists in history.

What I love about this album is that it does not stand on the strengths of Dylan's past material(Girl North country excluded) and manages to be great anyway. It's kind of like Love and Theft in that way.


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PostPosted: Tue March 17th, 2009, 04:33 GMT 
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The context of the record is important. In 1969 country & western music was less cool than opera and show tunes. The impact of NS was a bit like Slow Train; people were about AS shocked. Country was "Oakie From Miskogee" released the same year. There was no "outlaw" country in 1969, just country and people who liked country hated rock and roll, hated the bands we loved... hell, it was country music fans that shot the hippie bikers at the end of Easy Rider! :shock:

NS followed int he footsteps of The Byrds Sweetheart of the Rodeo (1968) which itself had been influenced by the country moves on JWH (1967)

1969 was also the year that the Flying Burrito Brothers released their debut,The Gilded Palace of Sin.

So... it wasn't completely an isolated thing; it was country music that was sort of at the center of what was described as post-psychedelic music (post 1967); the acid wore off and hippies started planting vegetables. All the rock bands moved out of the Bay Area and LA for Mill Valley, Laurel Canyon, Topanga Canyon, etc.

In a sense then.... JWH leads to NS leads to CSN leads to The Eagles.

Yes. Bob Dylan gave birth to The Eagles.


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PostPosted: Tue March 17th, 2009, 04:50 GMT 

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Long Johnny wrote:
Yes. Bob Dylan gave birth to The Eagles.


That's just cruel. Really, show some respect.


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PostPosted: Tue March 17th, 2009, 10:41 GMT 
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Along with "Love and Theft", Nashville Skyline is one of my favourites, a lovely little album that stands on it's own....


I Threw It All Away is one of Dylan's best...


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PostPosted: Tue March 17th, 2009, 14:07 GMT 
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YoYo wrote:
Long Johnny wrote:
Yes. Bob Dylan gave birth to The Eagles.


That's just cruel. Really, show some respect.


It's not his fault.

cropduster wrote:
Along with "Love and Theft", Nashville Skyline is one of my favorites, a lovely little album that stands on it's own....

I Threw It All Away is one of Dylan's best...


It definitely is. Amazing how he can just move into a foreign territory and write as if he's a native.


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PostPosted: Tue March 17th, 2009, 17:37 GMT 
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I always felt that during this period Dylan was struggling to come up with a new artistic identity for himself. As detailed in Chronicles he was fed up with the counter-culture and their expectations of him so he was trying to find a new persona that he could operate within, separate from those expectations. And I think he used his friend, Johnny Cash, as a model during this period for the type of artist that he could be - saying "Hey, Johnny is able to do whatever type of music he wants - folk, blues, country, rockabilly, and nobody hassles him". It worked great on this album and then hit a dead-end about halfway through Self Portrait.


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PostPosted: Tue March 17th, 2009, 18:06 GMT 
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At the same time though it is both a perfectly logical extension of JWH and an interesting sort of response album to The Byrds' Sweetheart of the Rodeo.


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PostPosted: Tue March 17th, 2009, 18:23 GMT 
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Yeah, I've always been fascinated by the way the last 2 songs on JWH point the way to this album. Those 2 songs really do stand apart from the rest of that album, almost like he was already moving on to the next phase before he was even done with the current one!


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PostPosted: Wed March 18th, 2009, 00:20 GMT 
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Can't get enough of this album! I was lucky enough to find a reprint poster of the album cover on Ebay to help my house with that autumn/down home feel.


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PostPosted: Wed March 18th, 2009, 02:28 GMT 
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I like this album...it's a lot of fun and obviously not meant to be taken seriously. Whenever I have an extra 27 minutes, I'll gladly throw this on.


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PostPosted: Wed March 18th, 2009, 02:48 GMT 
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Nothing wrong with this one.


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PostPosted: Wed December 13th, 2017, 03:31 GMT 
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Guys and gals, what's the best release of this album?

All the talk about the half-speed Blood on the Tracks and the mono release of John Wesley Harding has made me hungry to try out some listening suggestions of my long-time, sentimental, favourite Dylan album: Nashville Skyline.

8)

I think my only listening experience of this album thus far has been via the 2003 SACD release.


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PostPosted: Wed December 13th, 2017, 04:06 GMT 

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I just put on Nashville Skyline tonight after not listening to it for a long time, I'm glad this discussion came back around! I'm still warming up to the record, I don't know if I'll ever really love it but I do think there's some great songs beyond Lay, Lady, Lay.


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PostPosted: Thu December 14th, 2017, 10:54 GMT 

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The best sounding release would be the 1974 Quad remix but off the album also a couple of unique mono mixes were issued on singles (45's) in 1969, the final true mono mixes done for Dylan single releases.


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PostPosted: Sat December 16th, 2017, 10:26 GMT 
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Brickbat wrote:
The best sounding release would be the 1974 Quad remix but off the album also a couple of unique mono mixes were issued on singles (45's) in 1969, the final true mono mixes done for Dylan single releases.

Thanks man, I'll check them out!

Anyone heard the 1981 half-speed remaster?


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PostPosted: Sun December 17th, 2017, 01:52 GMT 

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So finally after giving this a few more listens I now "get it". The last three songs are fantastic little country tunes. I found out I love putting this on when driving at night of all times. I've seen this routinely ranked higher than John Wesley Harding and I think that's a bit much. JWH strikes me as Dylan's last 60s masterpiece, and he followed it up with a great country album. That's a good way to end the decade!


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PostPosted: Sun December 17th, 2017, 11:29 GMT 

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I love the change of style of Nashville Skyline .Its a real departure musically and has some of his more inventive melodies. It would have been nice if Bob could have come up with a couple of extra songs to give it a more substantial length.Overall its shows yet another dimension to Dylan's songwriting .The classics here are Lay Lady Lay I Threw It All Away and Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You.


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PostPosted: Sun December 17th, 2017, 12:16 GMT 
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Nashville Skyline for me has always been up there with the best. It was the first Dylan album I heard around 1972 when I was around 7 years old. Love the songs, the playing, the voice and the great chops by Ken Buttrey. NS has stood the test of time for sure.
Elliott Landy captured a brilliant album photograph of Bob. It's all good in my book and has stayed with me.

moab


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