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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 19:50 GMT 
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Released April 9, 1969
Recorded February 12–21, 1969
Genre Country music
Length 27:01
Label Columbia
Producer(s) Bob Johnston

Bob Dylan - Guitar, Harmonica, Keyboards, Vocals
Johnny Cash - Vocals, Performer
Pete Drake - Guitar
Kenneth A. Buttrey - Drums
Charlie Daniels - Bass guitar, Guitar
Bob Wilson - Organ, Piano
Charlie McCoy - Guitar, Harmonica
Charlie Bragg - Engineer
Neil Wilburn - Engineer
Norman Blake - Guitar, Dobro

Nashville Skyline is Bob Dylan's 9th proper studio album, released by Columbia Records in 1969.

The album marked a dramatic departure for Dylan, previously known for his groundbreaking, poetic folk music and rock'n'roll. Nashville Skyline, building on a rustic style he experimented with on John Wesley Harding, displayed a complete immersion into country music. Along with the more basic themes and simple songwriting structures, it introduced audiences to a radically new singing voice from Dylan - a soft, affected country croon.

The result received some mixed reaction from critics at the time, but Nashville Skyline, despite its brevity (it is Dylan's shortest album), was a commercial success. Reaching #3 in the US, the album also scored Dylan his 4th UK #1 album.

As he would later write in his autobiography, by 1969, Dylan was growing more frustrated by his lack of privacy. Relocating his family failed to deter fans from intruding on his property and he became increasingly wary of how other residents viewed him. "The neighbors hated us", Dylan recalled. "To them, it must've seemed like I was something out of a carnival show."

Fatherhood had also changed Dylan's priorities. Married with three children, he was only interested in providing for his family and keeping out of trouble, which meant distancing himself from the political turmoil pervading the country. To his chagrin, the press continued to promote him as the spokesperson of his generation. "I wasn't the toastmaster of any generation", Dylan wrote, "and that notion needed to be pulled up by its roots."

In February 1969, Dylan returned to Nashville to begin work on Nashville Skyline. It had been over a year since his last album, John Wesley Harding, was released, and it had been fifteen months since he produced that album, the last time he was in a recording studio.

Dylan held sessions at Columbia's Studio A, scheduling the first on the 12th, but there's no record of any work from that first session. A second session held the following day produced master takes of "To Be Alone With You", "I Threw It All Away", and "One More Night." Dylan also made several attempts at "Lay Lady Lay"; as with "I Threw It All Away", "Lay Lady Lay" was written in 1968, one of the few songs written by Dylan that year.

The songs on Nashville Skyline were very relaxed with modest ambitions, something reflected in the studio work ethic. "We just take a song, I play it and everyone else just sort of fills in behind it", Dylan recalls. "At the same time you're doing that, there's someone in the control booth who's turning all those dials to where the proper sound is coming in."

Dylan was also singing with a soft, smooth, country-tinged croon, and many listeners would be startled by this 'new' voice. Dylan credited it with a break from cigarettes, but a number of friends and family members were able to draw a connection with his 'new' voice and the one he used to use when he played at the Ten O' Clock Scholar in New York City and the Purple Onion coffee shop in Minneapolis during the winter and spring of 1960.

Master takes for "Peggy Day", "Tell Me That Isn't True", "Country Pie" and "Lay Lady Lay" were completed the next day, the 14th, Valentine's Day. During the two-day break that followed, Dylan penned another song, "Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You."

When sessions resumed on the 17th, "Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You" was the primary focus, and a master take was selected from a total of eleven takes. An instrumental, titled "Nashville Skyline Rag", was also recorded at the beginning of the session, and it was later included on the album.

Sometime during that session, country legend Johnny Cash stopped by to visit. A friend and label-mate of Dylan's as well as an early supporter of his music, Cash had been recording next door with his own band. The two wound up recording a series of duets, covering Dylan's "One Too Many Mornings" and "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" as well as Cash's own "I Still Miss Someone." None of these were deemed usable, but Cash returned the following day to record more duets.

The session on the 18th was devoted exclusively to duet covers with Cash. "One Too Many Mornings" and "I Still Miss Someone" were revisited, and rejected, yet again. "Matchbox", "That's All Right Mama", "Mystery Train", "Big River", "I Walk the Line", and "Guess Things Happen That Way", all made famous by celebrated Sun recordings performed by Carl Perkins, Elvis Presley, and Cash himself, were all attempted on the 18th, but none of these were deemed usable. Covers of Jimmie Rodgers' "Blue Yodel #1" and "#5", Cash's "Ring of Fire" (written by his wife, June Carter and Merle Kilgore), "You Are My Sunshine", "Mountain Dew", the traditional ballad "Careless Love", the traditional hymn "Just A Closer Walk With Thee", "How High The Water", and "Wanted Man" (a song written by Dylan specifically for Cash) were also attempted, and all were rejected. There was little enthusiasm over any of these tracks, but one duet of Dylan's "Girl From The North Country" (which originally appeared on The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan) was ultimately sequenced as the album's opener.

With primary recording complete, three more overdub sessions were held on the 19th, 20th, and 21st. After these sessions were completed, acetate pressings were made for a preliminary sequence to Nashville Skyline. Originally a nine-track, twenty-three minute program, Dylan ultimately kept this sequence intact with one significant amendment, adding "Girl From The North Country" as the opening cut.

Unlike other country-rock excursions, like The Byrds' landmark Sweetheart of the Rodeo, Nashville Skyline was rooted far more in modern country than in rural folk music. By 1969, the country music establishment was following popular trends, moving away from its roots and closer to mainstream pop. Nashville Skyline was a reflection of this, complete with a number of clichés associated with the genre.

The album begins with a new version of "Girl From The North Country", Dylan's duet with Johnny Cash. A close friend of Dylan's since their meeting at the 1964 Newport Folk Festival, Cash also wrote the Grammy-winning album notes for the album. A hesitant performance, the duet slows to a halt after some awkward line-trading. One verse ("Many times I've often prayed/In the darkness of my night") is also deleted in this performance.

"Peggy Day", "Country Pie", and "Nashville Skyline Rag" are perhaps the humblest recordings on Nashville Skyline. Upbeat and uptempo, lyrically they have little ambition ("Nashville Skyline Rag" is actually an instrumental), but the recordings are centered around the performances, not the words. This became more apparent many years later when Dylan used "Country Pie" as a live, improvisational showcase in the late 1990s.

"'Tell Me That Isn't True' is the voice of a suspicious man who promises himself he'll take his woman's word for her fidelity, all the time denying the 'rumors all over town' that she's 'been seen with some other man,'" writes NPR's Tim Riley. "Dylan gives it a forced sincerity of someone who can't help deceiving himself, and the song catches a quiet terror."

"Lay Lady Lay" turned out to be one of Dylan's biggest pop hits, reaching #7 in the US, and giving him his biggest single in three years. "Lay Lady Lay" was originally written for the film Midnight Cowboy, but Dylan did not deliver it in time for it to be included in the score. He was initially reluctant to authorize the single's release, but eventually approved at the insistence of Columbia president Clive Davis.

"Sometimes... I go to the artist and say, 'What do you hear on the drums?' Because sometimes when people write songs they can hear it completed, they hear everything they think's gonna be on it", says drummer Ken Buttrey. "I went over to Dylan and said, 'I'm having a little trouble thinking of something to play. Do you have any ideas on ['Lay Lady Lay']?'... He said, 'Bongos'... I immediately disregarded that, I couldn't hear bongos in this thing at all... So I walked into the control room and said, 'Bob [Johnston], what do you hear as regards [to] drums on this thing?'... [He] said, 'Cowbells.'... Kris Kristofferson was working at Columbia Studios at the time as a janitor and he had just emptied my ashtray at the drums and I said, 'Kris, do me a favor, here, hold these two things... hold these bongos in one hand and the cowbells in the other,' and I swung this mike over to the cowbells and the bongos... I had no pattern or anything worked out. I just told Kris, 'This is one of those spite deals. I'm gonna show 'em how bad their ideas're gonna sound.'... We started playing the tune and I was just doodling around on these bongos and the cowbells and it was kinda working out pretty cool... Come chorus time I'd go to the set of drums. Next time you hear that [cut], listen how far off-mike the drums sound. There were no mikes on the drums, it was just leakage... But it worked out pretty good... To this day it's one of the best drum patterns I ever came up with."

"I Threw It All Away" was another hit single for Nashville Skyline. Riley describes it as "a glimmer of honesty from a person who has taken love for granted, squandered its rewards, and lived to sing about it." ("Once I had mountains in the palm of my hand/And rivers that ran through ev'ry day/I must have been mad/I never knew what I had/Until I threw it all away.") Yo La Tengo would later cover it on President Yo La Tengo while Elvis Costello has featured it in a number of solo concerts.

"Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You" is "perhaps the best song of the sessions", writes Clinton Heylin, "a fine cousin to John Wesley Harding's 'I'll Be Your Baby Tonight.'" Both songs closed their respective albums on a relaxed, romantic note with a hint of sexual longing. Dylan actually wrote "Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You" in February 1969 at a Ramada Inn on one of the motel's notepads. The third and final single from Nashville Skyline, like the previous two singles, it would also be a hit.

Producer Bob Johnston reportedly left a collection of master recordings from the Nashville Skyline sessions in a Nashville storage facility, and the tapes ended up in private hands after being auctioned off for nonpayment of rent.

Dylan and Cash recorded an entire album's worth of duets of country standards during the Nashville Skyline sessions, which remains unreleased. An unauthorized selection from those duets circulates among Dylan collectors and has been commercially bootlegged. It is sometimes described as an unreleased LP, but there is no hard evidence of its exact source.

At the beginning of "Girl of the North Country" either Bob Dylan or Johnny Cash can be heard swallowing a drink of water.

At the beginning of "To Be Alone With You" Bob Dylan asks "Is it rolling, Bob?",talking to the producer, Bob Johnston.

The titles of the songs on the B side form a poem:

Lay lady lay,
One more night,
Tell me that it isn't true.
Country pie,
Tonight,
I'll be staying here with you.


Nashville Skyline was finished and scheduled for release in May 1969, but at the end of April, Dylan returned to Columbia's Studio A in Nashville for three more recording sessions. These sessions, held on April 24, 26th, and May 3, were dedicated to country standards with one exception, a new composition titled "Living The Blues." Dylan was apparently planning his next album.

"Bob asked my opinion of the album's concept early on", recalls Clive Davis. "My objections wouldn't necessarily have stopped the album, but I knew he'd been having some difficulty coming up with his own material...so I encouraged him."

By the time Nashville Skyline was recorded, the political climate in the United States had grown more turbulent and polarized. In 1968, civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. and Senator Robert Kennedy (a leading candidate for the presidency) were both assassinated. Riots had broken out in several major cities, including a major riot surrounding the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois and a number of racially-motivated riots spurred by King's assassination. A new administration led by President Richard Nixon was instated in January 1969, but the U.S. engagement in Southeast Asia, particularly the Vietnam War, would continue for several more years. Protests over a wide-range of political topics became more frequent. Dylan had been a leading cultural figure, noted for his political and social commentary throughout the 1960s. Even as he moved away from agitprop, he never lost his cultural status. However, as Clinton Heylin would write about Nashville Skyline, "if Dylan was concerned about retaining a hold on the rock constituency, making albums with Johnny Cash in Nashville was tantamount to abdication in many eyes."

Helped by a promotional appearance on The Johnny Cash Show on June 7, Nashville Skyline went on to become one of Dylan's best-selling albums. Three singles were pulled from the album, all of which received significant airplay on AM radio.

Despite the dramatic, commercial shift in direction, the press also gave Nashville Skyline a warm reception. A critic for Newsweek wrote of "the great charm... and the ways Dylan, both as composer and performer, has found to exploit subtle differences on a deliberately limited emotional and verbal scale." In his review for Rolling Stone, Paul Nelson wrote, "Nashville Skyline achieves the artistically impossible: a deep, humane, and interesting statement about being happy. It could well be...his best album." However, years later in a review for Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits Vol. II, Nelson would retract his opinion, writing "I was misinformed. That's why no one should pay any attention to critics, especially the artist."

Few critics expressed immediate disappointment, but of those who did, Ed Ochs of Billboard wrote, "the satisfied man speaks in clichés, and blushes as if every day were Valentine's Day", while Tim Souster of the BBC's The Listener magazine magazine wrote, "One can't help feeling something is missing. Isn't this idyllic country landscape [simply] too good to be true?"

As Nashville Skyline continued to enjoy strong sales, Dylan planned his first concert performance since the Woody Guthrie memorial in January 1968. English promoters had approached Dylan about appearing at the Isle of Wight festival at Woodside Bay in Isle of Wight, England. Before agreeing to the arrangements, Dylan made a surprise public performance on July 14, 1969. At the Mississippi River Festival held at Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, Illinois, Dylan joined the Band for a brief three-song set, performing Woody Guthrie's "Ain't Got No Home", Leadbelly's "In The Pines", and Little Richard's "Slippin' and Slidin'."

Later, on August 31, 1969, Dylan would appear with the Band at the Isle of Wight festival, performing a one-hour, seventeen-song setlist dominated by Dylan's compositions; only two songs, "I Threw It All Away" and "Lay Lady Lay", were performed from Nashville Skyline.

Roughly 200,000 fans attended Isle of Wight, and though audience reaction was strong enough to elicit a two-song encore, Dylan was dissatisfied with the whole performance. Dylan had hired Elliot Mazer to record his set, hoping to release an official live album. Instead, Dylan scrapped those plans, but not before sending the tapes to Nashville, where Bob Johnston began to remix the recordings.

Dylan had told Rolling Stone in late June that he would resume touring in the fall, but after the experience at Isle of Wight, those plans never materialized. There would be a few more sporadic performances before Dylan would finally resume touring in January 1974, four and a half years after the Isle of Wight festival.

Dylan was not alone in his disappointment with Isle of Wight, and he would experience that harsh criticism when a selection of those performances appeared on his next album. The stage had already been set with the three Nashville sessions in late April and early May, as Dylan was about to face the worst reviews of his career.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_Skyline


Favorite Song: Girl From the North Country
Least Favorite: Not Sure
Favorite line(s):

I can hear that whistle blowin',
I see that stationmaster, too,
If there's a poor boy on the street,
Then let him have my seat
'Cause tonight I'll be staying here with you.

I don't need much and that ain't no lie
Ain't runnin' any race
Give to me my country pie
I won't throw it up in anybody's face

Overall Album Rating: 7.5/10

Outtakes:


One Too Many Mornings- http://www.sendspace.com/file/2k6t5r
I Still Miss Someone- http://www.sendspace.com/file/u9iuen
Careless Love- http://www.sendspace.com/file/beju3y
Matchbox- http://www.sendspace.com/file/tt5t4a
That's All Right Mama- http://www.sendspace.com/file/wgore0
Big River- http://www.sendspace.com/file/nyhpgp
I Walk The Line- http://www.sendspace.com/file/u6lgmo
You Are My Sunshine- http://www.sendspace.com/file/ey31wc
Ring Of Fire- http://www.sendspace.com/file/7zbj7b
Guess Things Happen That Way- http://www.sendspace.com/file/9ogp2v
Just A Closer Walk With Thee- http://www.sendspace.com/file/qiu3lb
Blue Yodel- http://www.sendspace.com/file/z3sgfd
Bonus Track- Yesterday- http://www.sendspace.com/file/pntiv1


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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 20:37 GMT 

Joined: Tue March 29th, 2005, 08:28 GMT
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Thanks for those outtakes, Tambo.

I agree that Girl from the north is the best track, but I Threw It All Away comes pretty close..


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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 20:46 GMT 

Joined: Mon June 5th, 2006, 18:41 GMT
Posts: 1979
Favorite Song: "I Threw It All Away"
Least Favorite: "Peggy Day"

Overall: 7.8/10

A nice, relaxing album that's solid throughout, even if it doesn't reach the mindblowing highs of other Dylan albums. If I'm having a bad day I'll sometimes listen to this one to perk me up a little bit.


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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 22:01 GMT 

Joined: Sun October 2nd, 2005, 06:51 GMT
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The first Dylan album I owned, if I remember correctly. I thought it would be a palatable way in. It's a favourite for many reasons; but it's so unrepresentative. I get annoyed when people say it's their favourite. I know that's horrifically snobbish of me, but it's like saying your favourite Marlon Brando film is Superman. Good film, sure, but there's so much more...

Anyway. Regardless of that, I like it very much indeed, but I wouldn't use the word 'great'. I don't think it's a 'great' work but I like it a great deal.

Interesting the way that some of these songs were turned inside out for the Rolling Thunder era. Play this, and then put on Lay Lady Lay and I Threw It All Away from Hard Rain, and Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You from Live 1975. In fact, the people that only own Nashville Skyline should try these next, just to be shaken up a bit.

Saddle me up a big white goose. Tie me on her and turn her loose!


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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 22:08 GMT 

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I like this album a lot, it's one I put on when I just feel like sitting around doing nothing. I actually had it on earlier today, it's the Flying Burrito Brothers' Gilded Palace of Sin now though.


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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 22:14 GMT 
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mackthefinger wrote:
The first Dylan album I owned, if I remember correctly. I thought it would be a palatable way in. It's a favourite for many reasons; but it's so unrepresentative. I get annoyed when people say it's their favourite. I know that's horrifically snobbish of me, but it's like saying your favourite Marlon Brando film is Superman. Good film, sure, but there's so much more...

Anyway. Regardless of that, I like it very much indeed, but I wouldn't use the word 'great'. I don't think it's a 'great' work but I like it a great deal.

Interesting the way that some of these songs were turned inside out for the Rolling Thunder era. Play this, and then put on Lay Lady Lay and I Threw It All Away from Hard Rain, and Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You from Live 1975. In fact, the people that only own Nashville Skyline should try these next, just to be shaken up a bit.

Saddle me up a big white goose. Tie me on her and turn her loose!



I'd say that his treatment of Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You during the 1975 tour, was his best treatment out of any of the NS songs live.

Lay Lady Lay and I Threw It All Away in 1976, don't thrill me too much. It's the versions of these songs from about '98 and on which are the best that I've heard. Girl of the North Country's newest arrangement is also great.


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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 23:33 GMT 
I like Nashville Skyline a lot. I associate it with his first album as
two that are different than the others and really rather unique.
What the rating is, whether it is his best album or how it stacks up
to country music greats of the past is irrelevant, it is a genuine
keeper whose shine does not dull after repeated listening. The
best parts to me are the two songs on side 2 where he does
Buddy Holly style hiccups, a very rare thing for Bob and I'm not
sure he has ever done it on any other songs. These add a high
point of interest to the passages they occur in and make the lines
stand out like a neon light.


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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 23:49 GMT 

Joined: Wed February 14th, 2007, 20:09 GMT
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Location: boston
this was my first album as well, it was my favorite album for awhile until i was introduced to his other material. it's still fun to go back and listen to it though because it's a pretty good album, especially north country and i threw it all away. Girl from the north country with johhny cash is such an underrated song, i loved hearing the two of them together


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PostPosted: Sun March 25th, 2007, 23:50 GMT 
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Mr. Tambourine Man wrote:




I'd say that his treatment of Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You during the 1975 tour, was his best treatment out of any of the NS songs live.



Definitely agree with you there, Tambourine Man.
That version may be one of my favorite live Dylan performances.


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 01:20 GMT 
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I, too, like Nashville Skyline alot. It was one of my first introductions to "country" music because up until then I really only had an ear for rock & roll. I've been a fan of good country music ever since & I have Bob to thank for that.

Bob's voice is great on this record and I think this record was fitting for this time in in his life; kinda homespun style.

Girl from the North Country is one of Bob's best lyrics IMO. And any woman who doesn't get a little warm listenin' to Lay Lady Lay has icewater running thru her veins.

Thanks for this posting series, Mr. T. It's made me give pause to some of Bob's records I haven't listened to for awhile. Maybe I'll give Nashvile Skyline a spin tonight.


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 02:02 GMT 
Quote:
And any woman who doesn't get a little warm listenin' to Lay Lady Lay has icewater running thru her veins.


You got it, Bostonbabe.

Love the playfulness of these lines from Country Pie as well:
Saddle me up to the big white goose
Tie me on her and turn her loose


And the simplicity of Girl from the North Country. :oops:
Always have always will

favorite lines from Lay Lady Lay and from the album are over-exposed, but I never tire of them:

1. Whatever colors you have in your mind
I'll show them to you and you'll see them shine[/i
]

2. [i][i]Why wait any longer for the one you love
when he's standing in front of you
[/i]
3. His clothes are dirty but his hands are clean
and you're the best thing that he's ever seen

4. I long to see you in the morning light
I long to reach for you in the night


I believe this is the greatest love song he ever wrote for Sara. (Read they actually had a brass bed in their home!)

And from Tonight I'll be Staying Here with You:
Throw my ticket out the window
Throw my suitcase out there too
Throw my troubles out the door
I don't need them anymore. . .


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 02:38 GMT 
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Quote:
[I believe this is the greatest love song he ever wrote for Sara. (Read they actually had a brass bed in their home!)

Hmmmm.... He always keeps us guessin - I read in the Mojo book that Bob said LLL was not written for Sara and he never owned a brass bed.
Wonder which it is? :? It's okay, I'll have to just pretend he had one then. Works for me! :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 04:18 GMT 
Jim W wrote:
I like Nashville Skyline a lot. I associate it with his first album as
two that are different than the others and really rather unique.
What the rating is, whether it is his best album or how it stacks up
to country music greats of the past is irrelevant, it is a genuine
keeper whose shine does not dull after repeated listening. The
best parts to me are the two songs on side 2 where he does
Buddy Holly style hiccups, a very rare thing for Bob and I'm not
sure he has ever done it on any other songs. These add a high
point of interest to the passages they occur in and make the lines
stand out like a neon light.


What he said. :)


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 04:23 GMT 

Joined: Thu January 12th, 2006, 02:44 GMT
Posts: 4850
This very good album. I liked very much.

However, the best live version of songs is Country Pie from 2000 tour.


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 04:27 GMT 

Joined: Thu January 12th, 2006, 02:44 GMT
Posts: 4850
SOmeone talk of Superman and how the album is like Marlon Brando. Did you know there is new version of Superman Part Two, and you see so much Marlon MBrabndo thgat you do not see before. You see the Marlon's head float, you see Superman talk to his father Marlobm in the cave of wonders. Did you know the originial Super man Part Two was directedf by Dick Lester who made Hard Dat's Night. The directer of Syperman part One direct the sequel, but then Lester come in to replace. Now the original directer, Dick Donner, who made Lethal Weapon, he comes in and restores his vision, and only his version has all this footasge of Marlon Brando as Jor EL.


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 06:05 GMT 
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Thankyou, Neil Borat.


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 Post subject: Not very good
PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 08:49 GMT 
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This is one of those albums that was more of a statement by Dylan than it was serious art (but that's even more the case with the next album). Here is the sound of a bored songwriter with writer's block putting out product to fill a gap, and using the product -- in lieu of major songs -- to tell the world that he just a downhome country boy. Not that anyone believed him.

The music -- sparse as it is -- on Nashville Skyline is quite enjoyable if you're in a totally uncritical mood to be entertained by a jaunty rag. Otherwise, it's largely forgettable. There's nothing wrong with putting out a record like this, but why so little (27 minutes?), and why include the god-awful pastiche of 'Girl From The North Country' off the top, as an afterthought?

The weirdest thing about this album is that it sold so well. I think that freaked out Dylan a bit... hence, Self Portrait.


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 13:07 GMT 

Joined: Mon September 19th, 2005, 17:17 GMT
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Location: Where black is the color, where none is the number
Favorite song: Girl of the North Country
Least Favorite: Nashville Skyline Rag
Favorite lines: "If there's a poor boy on the street,
Then let him have my seat,
'Cause tonight I'll be staying here with you."
What a concert opener, that one...


Rating: 8/10

A lovely little pearl: laid back, everything but pretentious, melodic and short. I love the vocals on it too.


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 17:01 GMT 
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Nashville Skyline was one of the later Dylan albums I got, and I will admit at first I was a little put off, as it was so different from the material I'd heard before. But it has grown on me over time. Like most people are saying, I do enjoy the laid back, down home quality of it. Bob's voice is so drastically different, (but very sexy yes) that I've often played it for non Dylan fans just to show them how far ranging his sound has been over the years.

I wouldn't say it's high up on my list of favorite Dylan albums, but I think it's a great piece of work and I love Girl of the North Country with Cash.

Thank you for the oodles of info and those great outtakes Tambourine!


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 20:47 GMT 
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In my view this was Dylan's third not indispensable album but while his debut had a plenty of attitude and Another side came with a lot of good lyrics Nashville skyline offers just a little charm to cover up for some massive lack of inspiration.

As good an idea it would seem twenty years later with Dylan doing nursery rhyme on Under the red sky, as fun it should be to hear Dylan going country but to my ears the required energy is missing at both these occasions. The rock gun went country pop.

Dylan said sometime that with this album you'd have to listen inbetween the lines and yes, I'd like to think that a title like To be alone with you would provide a great angle for country Dylan but there's no humorous ambivalence coming through in either the music or the words.

Likewise with the 'classics' I threw it all away and Lay, Lady, Lay - there are no memorable turns of phrase here and if the former has 'sexual imagery' I wouldn't know what kind of love Dylan was thinking of, 'Mountains in the palm of my hand'...

OK, there are a few instances of serious silliness that I like, Peggy Day, One more night and Country pie but in neither song he and band manage to quite pull it through, I think.

In my opinion that's because Dylan just hadn't learned to master his 'new' voice yet and while there are moments (as on the bridges of Peggy Day and One more night) it's far short of the better examples on Self Portrait and New Morning.


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PostPosted: Mon March 26th, 2007, 21:48 GMT 

Joined: Thu January 12th, 2006, 02:44 GMT
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I think The Country Pie is Bob Dylan's number one song. Such good rhymes, "Joe-Toe, Goose-Loose, Tree-Me, Lie-Pie, Race-Face"


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 00:09 GMT 

Joined: Mon March 26th, 2007, 18:54 GMT
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i threw it all away is awesome. It has such a powerful yet simple message.


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 00:10 GMT 

Joined: Sat November 4th, 2006, 00:48 GMT
Posts: 620
Location: Ontario
I like this one a lot as well. I don't know if I have much to say about it, though. His voice sounds neat.

I, for one, don't like the version of Girl From The North Country on here. It should've, could've been great with Cash and all, but it somehow ends up sounding silly and hollow. However, I adore I Threw It All Away, Lay Lady Lay, To Be Alone With You, Tell Me That It Isn't True, and Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You. Peggy Day and Country Pie are slight but harmless.

Quote:
Interesting the way that some of these songs were turned inside out for the Rolling Thunder era. Play this, and then put on Lay Lady Lay and I Threw It All Away from Hard Rain, and Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You from Live 1975. In fact, the people that only own Nashville Skyline should try these next, just to be shaken up a bit.

I actually heard Live 1975 before Nashville Skyline, so the Rolling Thunder version was the first of Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You that I heard. It was really quite the shock to go from the searing rock and roll to the calm, downhome country....but I like both renditions equally.

Quote:
i threw it all away is awesome. It has such a powerful yet simple message.

I especially like the bridge

Love is all there is, it makes the world go 'round,
Love and only love, it can't be denied.
No matter what you think about it
You just won't be able to do without it.
Take a tip from one who's tried.


I don't know if I believe all that, but I have to admit it's a nice turn of phrase.


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 00:39 GMT 

Joined: Thu January 12th, 2006, 02:44 GMT
Posts: 4850
I for one, do not particularly care for the Nashville Rolling Thunder numbers. They are merely so-so. The novelty wears off quickly of hearing Mr. Dylan and Friends shouting the lyrics for Lay Lady Lay, and giving an identical treatment to I Threw It All Away.

For an irreverent interpretation, I much prefer Lay Lady Lay '74, whatever colors you have in your MIND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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PostPosted: Tue March 27th, 2007, 00:57 GMT 

Joined: Sat November 4th, 2006, 00:48 GMT
Posts: 620
Location: Ontario
LittleFishes wrote:
I for one, do not particularly care for the Nashville Rolling Thunder numbers. They are merely so-so. The novelty wears off quickly of hearing Mr. Dylan and Friends shouting the lyrics for Lay Lady Lay, and giving an identical treatment to I Threw It All Away.

Yeah I don't like LLL in that style at all. "LAY LADY LAY!!!" Ugh. I know Dylan often like to radically switch up the styles of songs, but that style didn't work for that one. For Tonight I'll Be... though I think it works nicely.


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