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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 08:34 GMT 

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The MEZ doesn't often listen to this one often. I put it alongside It ain't Me Babe. I Like both a lot & are certaintly classics. However, for some reason I do not listen to it as much, as it probably deserves. So many great live renditions to choose from, the 60's to the present. Marker a tall task for you to find a definitive version. What are others thoughts on this classic tune? dates, posts, comments etc. MEZ


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 08:51 GMT 
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Chicks love it.

I like it.


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 08:59 GMT 
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There are songs that impose themselves as strong from the first listen. This is one of them. A classic.
And I like the "woman/woman/woman/brake like a girl" thing.

I listen to it very rarely though. Not even once a year.


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 09:05 GMT 
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wicked messenger wrote:
There are songs that impose themselves as strong from the first listen. This is one of them. A classic.
And I like the "woman/woman/woman/brake like a girl" thing.

I listen to it very rarely though. Not even once a year.



Brake like a girl? I didn't know it was about women drivers! Ace.


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 13:28 GMT 
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I would hear it often


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 13:34 GMT 
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Mez wrote:
The MEZ doesn't often listen to this one often. I put it alongside It ain't Me Babe. I Like both a lot & are certaintly classics. However, for some reason I do not listen to it as much, as it probably deserves. So many great live renditions to choose from, the 60's to the present. Marker a tall task for you to find a definitive version. What are others thoughts on this classic tune? dates, posts, comments etc. MEZ

tweedledum agrees with the mez


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 13:37 GMT 
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I await the opinion that's it's bad because Alvy Singer thought so in Annie Hall.


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 14:10 GMT 
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A song that just doesn't stand up over the years; clearly written by a 20-something, I'm actually embarrassed for Bob to hear it now a days. As far as versions, the Bangladesh one and the LP one. Don't get me started on the NET. :shock:


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 17:59 GMT 
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Long Johnny wrote:
I'm actually embarrassed for Bob to hear it now a days


Yeah, poor Bob.

:lol:


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 22:59 GMT 
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It is not a song that if written today would be regarded as politically correct. But as a song of the sixties and a classic Dylan song it stands tall.


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 23:28 GMT 

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Great great song...how can anyone not like this one?


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 23:34 GMT 
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I love the live version with the special Bible lyrics about Mary from 1978.


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PostPosted: Wed July 22nd, 2009, 23:51 GMT 

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In my opinion, it is actually one of few Dylan songs that have aged very bad...it sounds very dated, especially the lyrics


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PostPosted: Thu July 23rd, 2009, 01:33 GMT 
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Ask any musician and they will say that song is one of Bob's Gems.....It stands up the "Knockin on Heaven's Door"


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PostPosted: Thu July 23rd, 2009, 01:38 GMT 
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mjeff wrote:
Great great song...how can anyone not like this one?
Only one performance that I can say I "like" - NOLA Jazz Festival, April 26, 2003. If it weren't for Dickie Landrie's saxophone work, that one would not be on the list.

I really don't see (hear) what there is to be excited about. It's "okay" and that's about it.


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PostPosted: Thu July 23rd, 2009, 09:36 GMT 

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petpap wrote:
In my opinion, it is actually one of few Dylan songs that have aged very bad...it sounds very dated, especially the lyrics


Long Johnny wrote:
A song that just doesn't stand up over the years; clearly written by a 20-something, I'm actually embarrassed for Bob to hear it now a days. As far as versions, the Bangladesh one and the LP one. Don't get me started on the NET. :shock:


What exactly do these comments mean? Dated??? Doesn't stand up???? Long John, your riddle is quite perplexing. It's an embarrassing dated song, but yet you have favorite versions?!?
Please tell me that the above comments have nothing to do with the old misogyny argument again. it's tired and absurd. No one on this website should be fooled by such ridiculousness. This is certainly one of the finest songs of Bob's career if not in all of popular music. it's an intimate song about an intimate relationship. It's about people struggling with the idea of caring for one another despite the pain it may cause them.

I myself am of the opinion that the song was written at the time, to a large degree due to inspiration by Edie Sedgwick.
Jonathan Taplin who was Dylan's road manager at the time and later produced The last Waltz said this about their relationship:
"Dylan liked Edie because she was one of the few people who could stand up against his weird little numbers; she was much stronger than the sycophants who were hanging around him at the time. He was always in an adversary relationship with women. He tested people, perhaps to find out about himself. His transition from folk purity to rock insanity was overwhelming him. he needed to know: who was he? Dylan respected Edie's spirit and her strength in being able to deal with him, and that she didn't wither."
Their relationship was far larger than any simple love affair could attest to. Far more important, Edie acted as a muse for Bob. A very troubled, very intelligent, deeply sensitive creative beautiful young woman who somehow was able to see things as they truly were, despite the artifice of her surroundings. Of course, Bob saw himself in her. But being Edie, one couldn't help also seeing her child-like delicacy, her vulnerability, maybe even her future.
But larger than life though Edie may be, the song transcended her once it was written. The song became simply about a woman. More to the point, a man's relationship with a woman and the inherent differences.
Another inspiration perhaps:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mRTU_7M ... annel_page

If anything, Dylan's Just Like A Woman was far ahead of its time. I'm often deeply moved by the depth of maturity of this song, as I am by many songs on Blonde on Blonde.
And as with women in general, MEZ there are no definitive versions of this song.
There are hundreds of great versions of the song. My favorites really have been covers though.
Here are mine:

1. Nina Simone
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOmqNuH3 ... annel_page

2. Richie Havens (in a perfect medley with Tupelo Honey)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOmqNuH3 ... annel_page

As for Bobby, the song had a purity in the 1970's. Perhaps it was the country arrangement, perhaps it was the use of harmonic backups for the chorus, and of course Sara, but every rendition from 72-78 (JLAW is the only honest song from 78) ,is strong in its own right, perfect in its own way.

But my fave has to be Nov. 27th 1975, perhaps the most emotionally powerful vocal performance I've ever heard him give...ever.

http://www.sendspace.com/file/t2c6m7


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PostPosted: Thu July 23rd, 2009, 10:10 GMT 

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Long Johnny wrote:
A song that just doesn't stand up over the years; clearly written by a 20-something, I'm actually embarrassed for Bob to hear it now a days. As far as versions, the Bangladesh one and the LP one. Don't get me started on the NET. :shock:



Concert for Bangaldesh version made this song come alive for me, i really like hard rain version too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUkDcVZQnVY


if the song is indeed about Edie Sedgwick, then its better than Lou Reed's "Femme Fatale"


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PostPosted: Fri July 2nd, 2010, 13:32 GMT 
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Some time ago I combined the beginning of the audience tape of my favorite Just Like a Woman performance in 1975 from Cambridge with what we can hear in Renaldo and Clara so that I can hear the complete song in the best available quality.

No reason to hold it back, so here is the link:

http://www.sendspace.com/file/h6phhe

I did the same with Sara, perhaps I'll upload it too.


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PostPosted: Fri July 2nd, 2010, 15:59 GMT 

Joined: Wed November 19th, 2008, 03:29 GMT
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marker wrote:
I myself am of the opinion that the song was written at the time, to a large degree due to inspiration by Edie Sedgwick.
Jonathan Taplin who was Dylan's road manager at the time and later produced The last Waltz said this about their relationship:
"Dylan liked Edie because she was one of the few people who could stand up against his weird little numbers; she was much stronger than the sycophants who were hanging around him at the time. He was always in an adversary relationship with women. He tested people, perhaps to find out about himself. His transition from folk purity to rock insanity was overwhelming him. he needed to know: who was he? Dylan respected Edie's spirit and her strength in being able to deal with him, and that she didn't wither."
Their relationship was far larger than any simple love affair could attest to. Far more important, Edie acted as a muse for Bob. A very troubled, very intelligent, deeply sensitive creative beautiful young woman who somehow was able to see things as they truly were, despite the artifice of her surroundings. Of course, Bob saw himself in her. But being Edie, one couldn't help also seeing her child-like delicacy, her vulnerability, maybe even her future.
But larger than life though Edie may be, the song transcended her once it was written. The song became simply about a woman. More to the point, a man's relationship with a woman and the inherent differences.

I always thought of Edie as the inspiration for this song, too.
Nobody has to guess
That Baby can’t be blessed
Till she sees finally that she’s like all the rest
With her fog, her amphetamine and her pearls


Same with Leopard Skin Pillbox Hat, and who knows which others? Yet in some interview I recall seeing or reading (60 Minutes interview maybe?), Bob denied even knowing her. Go figure. :roll:


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PostPosted: Thu December 29th, 2011, 05:13 GMT 
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Just listened to the Live '66 version. It sounds like a howl of pain.


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PostPosted: Thu December 29th, 2011, 05:30 GMT 
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My favourite NET versions are:

NYC 2001
Sydney 2003


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PostPosted: Thu December 29th, 2011, 07:28 GMT 

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I don't think it has dated at all. Such themes had been coming up in music long before Dylan recorded the song, and they still are prevalent in music today. And Dylan's always been a warts and all songwriter. That's one of the reasons he's Bob Dylan. Taking shots at the chorus is easy if you refuse context, but it's the context that makes the song. The song isn't vindictive or angry. It's a portrait of a sad, small, lonely man who can't relate--everybody goes through the feelings Dylan's portraying, not just men. It's no different than a woman saying, "Guys are jackasses who have no depth" after a breakup. Yes, technically, the song's chorus is demeaning and misogynistic, but you're completely missing the point if all you focus on is the chorus. The song isn't Dylan saying**EXPLETIVE** OFF AND DIE **EXPLETIVE**. It's more Dylan saying, "I don't get you, we don't work, I don't know what to say, I'm going to make a summary judgment." The mood and tone of the song completely undercut the chorus, again, a Dylanesque move. He's saying one thing, but he's saying it like he's the most lonely guy on earth. And the bridge/last verse of the song are absolutely shattering and superb. As mentioned earlier, the Live '66 version is so so lonesome and restrained. It's one of the best songs on BoB, and I think it's one of the best precisely because it is so awkwardly pointed.

BoB is an album filled with songs that take digs. Everything from "Woman" to "Sooner or Later" to "Pillbox Hat" to "I Want You." Not all as blatant as "Woman," but they're still there. "Just Like a Woman" is far from Dylan at his meanest. "Like a Rolling Stone" is six-minutes of laughing in the face of somebody who has fallen on hard times. "Masters of War" wishes people dead. "Is Your Love in Vain?" asks if a woman can cook/sew/make flowers grow. Speaking of "Is Your Love in Vain?," now there's a song that lacks all of the subtlety and nuance of "Just Like a Woman." When Dylan gets to the end of that one, you feel no empathy whatsoever for the narrator. You just feel creeped out. A bad bad song like that emphasizes how great "Just Like a Woman" is.

That is all.


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PostPosted: Thu December 29th, 2011, 07:55 GMT 
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Here's Van Morrison's crazy cover:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZpKAB_6qkM
he gets the lyric


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PostPosted: Thu December 29th, 2011, 22:31 GMT 
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Great song, my personal favorite version is from the Rolling Thunder Revue Live '75. I know a girl who wrote a report in High School about why this song describes her, and knowing her as I do. I can say it's true


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PostPosted: Thu December 29th, 2011, 22:48 GMT 
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A song to remember the rest of our lives, other opinions are stupid.


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