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PostPosted: Sun May 8th, 2011, 21:13 GMT 

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http://rutube.ru/tracks/1431553.html?v= ... ea77683a9d

As I walked out tonight in the mystic garden
The wounded flowers were dangling from the vines
I was passing by yon cool and crystal fountain
Someone hit me from behind

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Through this weary world of woe
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
No one on earth would ever know

They say prayer has the power to help
So pray from the mother
In the human heart an evil spirit can dwell
I'm trying to love my neighbor and do good unto others
But oh, mother, things ain't going well

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
I'll burn that bridge before you can cross
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
They'll be no mercy for you once you've lost

Now I'm all worn down by weepin'
My eyes are filled with tears, my lips are dry
If I catch my opponents ever sleepin'
I'll just slaughter them where they lie

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Through the world mysterious and vague
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
Walking through the cities of the plague

The whole world is filled with speculation
The whole wide world which people say is round
They will tear your mind away from contemplation
They will jump on your misfortune when you're down

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Eatin' hog-eyed grease in hog-eyed town
Heart burnin' – still yearnin'
Someday you'll be glad to have me around

They will crush you with wealth and power
Every waking moment you could crack
I'll make the most of one last extra hour
I'll avenge my father's death then I'll step back

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Hand me down my walkin' cane
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
Got to get you out of my miserable brain

All my loyal and much-loved companions
They approve of me and share my code
I practice a faith that's been long abandoned
Ain't no altars on this long and lonesome road

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
My mule is sick, my horse is blind
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
Thinkin' ‘bout that gal I left behind

It's bright in the heavens and the wheels are flying
Fame and honor never seem to fade
The fire's gone out but the light is never dying
Who says I can't get heavenly aid?

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Carrying a dead man's shield
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
Walkin' with a toothache in my heel

The suffering is unending
Every nook and cranny has it's tears
I'm not playing, I'm not pretending
I'm not nursing any superfluous fears

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Walkin' ever since the other night
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
Walkin' ‘til I'm clean out of sight

As I walked out in the mystic garden
On a hot summer day, hot summer lawn
Excuse me, ma'am I beg your pardon
There's no one here, the gardener is gone

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Up the road around the bend
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
In the last outback, at the world's end


"As I walked out..."
With those first words for 'Ain't Talkin'-not only the longest song on Modern Times, and the strongest, but the only performance on the album where you don't hear calculation-Bob Dylan disappears. Someone other than the singer you think you know seems to be singing the song. He doesn't seem to know what effects to use, what they might even be for. It's the only song on the album, really, without an ending-and with those first four words, a cloud is cast. The singer doesn't know what's going to happen- and it's the way he expects nothing will happen, the way he communicates an innocence you instantly don't trust, that steels you for the story that he's about to tell, or that's about to sweep him up. He walks out into 'the mystic garden'. He stares at the flowers on the vines. He passes a fountain. Someone hits him from behind.
This is when he finds the world all before him-because he can't go back. There is only one reason to travel this road: revenge. For the only time on Modern Times, the music doesn't orchestrate, doesn't pump, doesn't give itself away with its first note. Led by Tony Garnier's cello and Donnie Herron's viola, the band curls around the singer's voice even as he curls around the ban's quiet, retreating, resolute sound, as if the whole song is the opening and closing of a fist, over and over again, the slow rhythm turning lyrics that are pretentious, even precious on the page into a kind of oracular bar talk, the old drunk who's there every night and never speaks finally telling his story.
"I practice a faith that's long abandoned", he says, and that might be the most frightening line Bob Dylan has written in years.
-Greil Marcus

Recently The Mez asked me how much I liked this song in the context of Modern Times and I had to rank it kinda low. Not because I think it's a bad song per se, just that I rarely find myself ever wanting to listen. I've always admired the song from a distance, always finding it rather obtuse and moody.
But recently I've been catching up to some more recent shows from last year and this and I stumbled upon a live version that for me at least, eclipsed even the album version.
I must admit I've never liked the song live, it always sounded so overbearing and melancholy for Bob and the boys to ever nail this in its fullest. I've always found the live debut really overrated and many throughout the years have been good not great.
But this one I just discovered from Lyon France might be the strongest one I've heard yet. It's got this great funky rhythm thanks to George's drumming, Bob's trippy organ, and some beautiful Charlie fills that serve the song as far more of a cowboy song than those before it and Bob pulls out a terrifying vocal performance, giving every line a distinct weight that sounds like he's forever walking through the streets of Hell...

Lyon France
June 20 2010
http://www.sendspace.com/file/wewtuq

Any other great live performances of this one I should here? Anyone know where Bob might have gotten some of the ideas in the song? How bout any love for the TTS version? And what's with the last note of the song?
Give it up folks! A big song in Bob's late canon...


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 00:06 GMT 

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my long long analysis of the song stanza by stanza. Sorry for jacking it.

The opening line sets the stage. He’s in a garden at night. He’s walking out. Perhaps a comparison to the Garden of Eden told about in Genesis. He describes how the flowers are dangling from a vine. They’re wounded. A suggestion of harmed people or harmed fruits. The fruits of life and knowledge comes to mind while describing a garden such as the one in Genesis. He passes by some fountain another comparison to the book of John where Jesus explain the water he gives will be a fountain of eternal life. Perhaps not a reference to the bible but a way of writing with a foundation. Even if you don’t know the bible you can easily assume what is happening here. He then gets struck from behind. He never describes his enemies. Never suggest them being human. This could be a way of saying being kicked while down. That life it’s self in this world has hit him so violently and cowardly from behind.

The refrains of “ain’t talkin’, just walkin…hear burnin’, still yearnin’” suggest that his heart is burning, something described in the bible as the spirit of god burns in our hearts. He has this spirit yet he also yearns for something else which is why he is going away and not speaking no more.

The second stanza explains how the world is full of anguish and despair. All these things he has conflict with no one will know. We are alone in are self struggles.

In the third stanza he is describing religion but in a way he is not really taking it serious. He is afraid of the evils getting into him. He is trying to do good but with this way of life it is hard. The next refrain he suggest burning a bridge so the sins of the world can’t follow him. It’s a vicious act, really putting his foot down here with some authority. He also explains how when you lose there will be no mercy. “Losing “could be a metaphor for judgment day. There will be no mercy for your sins.

The fifth stanza explains the state he is in. no a well one; his eyes are full of tears and he is dry. He is starting to have enough. He contrasts himself with David in the bible. Saul was out to kill David, yet when David saw Saul sleeping he did not kill him. Here the speaker will not follow that code. He is giving into the violence of the world. He, as well will not show mercy. Again in the book of James it reads that mercy will triumph over judgment. Another thing the speaker does not abide by anymore.

Stanza seven brings up the topic of speculation versus contemplation. Which one is better? In this case contemplation. The world is filled with speculation everyone thinking that they know everything without a reason or experience. He offers an example of the world being round, though no one experiencing it for sure. Contemplation is the questioning within, which is suggested something we all should do that no one is allowed to do. “They will jump on your misfortune” shows how people tend to only be interested in your flaws then something you’ve done right. It’s hard to get up when everyone is on you about your problems. He complains though he is “eating hog eyed grease in a hog eyed town,” he is becoming what he hates. He describes them as hogs and he is consuming hogs. No one is paying attention to him.

The line “they will crush you with wealth and power” never explains whose power. He is simply power in itself can destroy. Their power can ruin you, while the power they give you will ruin you. Any “moment you could crack” shows the sensitivity issue in this word. The next lines say that in his last hours he will revenge his father. Again giving into violence of the world. There is no suggestion that his father would want this either. There is no example of love between the mother, father or this son at all.


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 00:08 GMT 

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The eleventh stanza describes how his faith has been abandoned in the world. Religion has no place here much longer. Yet he has companions somewhere that approve of him, but there is no tell where they are or where they’ve gone. One might be “that gal” the one he needs to get out of his miserable brain, the one he left behind he still thinks about. He presses on anyway. His mule is sick and horse blind, he is in trouble.

The thirteenth stanza opens up with a storm. “Bright in the heavens and the wheels are flyin’” sounds a bit like the end. Though it’s the end the honor does not. What else doesn’t fade is this fire. Religion is gone here but faith still lingers, that “light is never dying.” He continues on his walk. “Carryin’ a dead man shield” is a way of describing how people take pointless items as if it will protect them from something. A dead man shield is pointless and all else have died with it, he will need something else. “Walkin’ with a toothache in my heel” is an interesting phrase to use while describing a pain in ones foot from walking long. Though Dylan comes from folk, folk blues and the bible he also goes by the beats. Reading much of their work and learning that art. This is a beat phrase by taking out the “as.” He could simply say the pain in my heel is as the pain in ones tooth. It’s a good sensory description.

In the following stanza he says that he is not “nursin’ any superfluous fears” that his fears are all real and necessary. He continues walking just as he has done before. He won’t stop, wants to be long gone away, “walkin til I’m clean out of sight.”

The last two stanzas he brings back the Garden. The setting is on a “hot summer day, a hot summer lawn” another great imagery. He sees someone and says; “Excuse me, ma’am, I beg your pardon,” these three sets of words are all very polite unlike the world he has described. So there is some hope for this speaker. He says that the gardener is gone. Which seems negative. A garden without a gardener. Surely there must have been one at first. It suggests that God is gone. Or by bringing up the story from the book of John where Mary is looking for the body of Jesus and cannot find it. She mistake Jesus as the Gardner. So by looking at this comparison we can see that perhaps a mistaking an object of faith is similar to mistaking a person. People take religion as something it is not. The gardener is gone but the Gardner isn’t that light. Do not be looking toward something that isn’t. The song ends with the speaker continuing his walk around the bend and walking in the last outback of the worlds end. He’s walking with only his eyes toward his faith.

What seems like a dark mysterious message might not be at the end. It’s an inspiring tale. One is down in woe of the world but can stay on a path through a faith, even though no one else believes in him. The greatest conflict in American stories is the self versus the world versus the self. Dylan has also noted that from the beginning he likes his last song of on his albums to always say; “good luck.” This one does that. It is a “good look” at the end of these “Modern Times.”

my favorite perfomance is hard to say. all are pretty solid. I saw him in Rochester 2010. It was cool to see his shadow cast behind him. looked like he was into his personia. He played with his organ...it worked.


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 00:29 GMT 
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marker wrote:
http://rutube.ru/tracks/1431553.html?v=d8c206810e89fa5ab94593ea77683a9d
...... Recently The Mez asked me how much I liked this song in the context of Modern Times and I had to rank it kinda low. Not because I think it's a bad song per se, just that I rarely find myself ever wanting to listen. I've always admired the song from a distance, always finding it rather obtuse and moody.
But recently I've been catching up to some more recent shows from last year and this and I stumbled upon a live version that for me at least, eclipsed even the album version.
I must admit I've never liked the song live, it always sounded so overbearing and melancholy for Bob and the boys to ever nail this in its fullest. I've always found the live debut really overrated and many throughout the years have been good not great.
But this one I just discovered from Lyon France might be the strongest one I've heard yet. It's got this great funky rhythm thanks to George's drumming, Bob's trippy organ, and some beautiful Charlie fills that serve the song as far more of a cowboy song than those before it and Bob pulls out a terrifying vocal performance, giving every line a distinct weight that sounds like he's forever walking through the streets of Hell...

Lyon France
June 20 2010
http://www.sendspace.com/file/wewtuq

Any other great live performances of this one I should here? Anyone know where Bob might have gotten some of the ideas in the song? How bout any love for the TTS version? And what's with the last note of the song?
Give it up folks! A big song in Bob's late canon...


My faves in no special order are:
Washington, DC 11-13-2010
Rockford, IL 10-27-2009
Santa Barbara 9-07-2008
Cordoba, Argentina 3-13-2008
St. Louis, MO 10-22-2007

some are guitar driven, some organ, some fiddle - all Bob's vocals are pretty INTENSE :shock: :!:


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 00:36 GMT 
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Like most of the songs on Modern Times, all of the lyrics in the song have some value, and some are just plain great ("The whole world is filled with speculation/the whole wide world which people say is round", he's speculating, get it?). Plus the vibe of the song is great; even though a lot of the lyrics are somewhat esoteric, you know what he's talking about because of the dark vibe.


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 00:49 GMT 
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"I practice a faith that's long been abandoned"

Where some credit Bob for writing the ultimate "devoid of meaning, full of images" songs made of floating signs one may interpret any way s/he pleases, this doesn't count. The character in this one has a "code"


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 04:08 GMT 

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just heard that one from france. that is my new fav. What are peoples thoughts or comments on the outtake one? I didn't bother to analysis those lyrics but it is an interesting change.


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 04:48 GMT 

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well no one mentions the alternatate 5th verse.. i guess even bob wont even talk to her. pity. this is the very verse that had me claim this handle.


It's the first new day of a grand and a glorious Autumn
The queen of love is coming across the grass
None dare call her anything but madam
No one flirts with her or even makes a pass

anyway. now ya know. 8)


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 13:32 GMT 

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Brilliant song. One of his last masterpieces.


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 19:45 GMT 

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iamhere wrote:
just heard that one from france. that is my new fav. What are peoples thoughts or comments on the outtake one? I didn't bother to analysis those lyrics but it is an interesting change.


A really great analysis you wrote iamhere!!
It's incredible how very Biblical the song is...in another context it could possibly fit into his Christian canon.
As for the TTS lyrics, I may not analyze them quite as interestingly as others might but they are fascinating in their own right.

Instead of:
They will tear your mind away from contemplation,
They will jump on your misfortune when you're down.

we have:
I've got no time for idle conversation
I need to find a doctor in this town.

Also:
Ain't talkin just walkin
All roads leading to the west
heart burnin still yearnin
I'm gonna throw myself on your loving breast

It's the first new day of a grand and a glorious Autumn
The queen of love is coming across the grass
None dare call her anything but madam
No one flirts with her or even makes a pass

Ain't talking, just walking
Standing outside the gates of wrath
Heart burning, still yearning
Take a little trip down the primrose path

I got the worst old feeling and it's getting stronger
I'm worn out with public service, I'm beginning to crack
I won't stay on any longer
I'll avenge my father's death then I'll step back

Furthermore, you don't have the perfect last chorus:

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Up the road, around the bend.
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
In the last outback at the world's end.

TTS:
Ain't talking, just walking
You ride 'em high and down you go
Heart burning, still yearning
No one on earth will ever know

I actually prefer the sound of the TTS version to Modern Times, but lyrically I obviously think the final version is a complete creation.
And yes, Queen Of Love that verse is one that should have been kept IMO.

And yeah that version from Lyon is easily the best I've ever heard!! Love the organ here:)


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PostPosted: Mon May 9th, 2011, 19:48 GMT 

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I'm not a huge fan of this tune but I do like it at times. That is a great live version Marker & thanks, as always! MEZ


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PostPosted: Tue May 10th, 2011, 00:14 GMT 

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I'm puzzled by people who don't respond to this, an exquisitely-wrought evocation of a God-abandoned world. On balance, it doesn't seem terribly esoteric to me- that theme runs through the entire song pretty clearly, I'd say, and I find it an unforgettable portrait of some aged, grim-faced pilgrim walking through the resulting desolation. It's hard not to picture some wild-eyed, out-of-time Puritan striding, cane in hand, through the Cities of the Plague. This is one of the great Bob Dylan songs, written and executed with a rigour that is rare in his work. It's written in the language of myth - of plagues, flying wheels, the shield of God, and (sublimely) those toothaches in the heel of ancient folk song.

Maybe the unimpressed listeners find it too theatrical, preferring their Dylan to sound more confessional? Or maybe people don't relate to the theme; but it's a great theme nevertheless, surely. The believer who goes on believing, honouring an absent god amidst the ruins.

Is there redemption here? Maybe, as iamhere suggests, the final 'gardner' reference summons up the idea of the empty tomb and thus the imminent salvation of Christ's return. The trouble with that reading is that our pilgrim then goes on to keep walking, past the last outback etc.. Christ doesn't seem to show up, in other words; unless that dramatic final major chord - one of the greatest chords in Dylan's discography - suggests precisely the uplift of the Resurrection. Myself, I prefer to think of that chord as a mysterious, sudden note of redemption...possibly the pilgrim himself being gathered up beyond this godless place via his death, or the world's ('the last outback...at the world's end'). In any case, there is redemption, at least tacitly.

A masterpiece.


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PostPosted: Tue May 10th, 2011, 02:35 GMT 
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Here's a good 'un: http://www.sendspace.com/file/xt3x4d

9/7/08 Santa Barbara

Some Dylan songs age well and some poorly, and I'm not talking about any political content or even the musical style, I mean that some lyrics grow and others don't after you first hear them. Dirge would be a song which I liked a lot at first, but after all these years I don't rate it nearly so highly. Like lots of Dylan songs Ain't Talkin has some dodgy moments for me, mixed with some truly fantastic stuff, and in this case time has been kind so far. The weaker moments are absorbed into the flow, the stronger ones continue to shine, and the whole works as well or better then it ever did. It doesn't hurt that's it's routinely performed, and performed well. I always felt there was a ponderousness about the studio cut, and the way that it announces itself as something "Important" I always find off-putting. I love the players, but if you went to walt disney studios with the chords and asked for something spooky you wouldn't land too far off of the album cut. I like the TTS version better for this reason, and I almost always like it live. No one version really rises to the top, though, like I said it's consistently well-done.


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PostPosted: Tue May 10th, 2011, 11:34 GMT 
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Love the song... my favorite from Modern Times... though I do believe forboding images of Jesus are always lurking in the shadows of the song.


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PostPosted: Tue May 24th, 2011, 16:40 GMT 

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okay just noticed this. maybe old news but in my analysis i thought of this wrong.

the line: "I got a toothach in my heel" might have been lifted from an old childs folk ballad.

Old Dan Tucker
"now old dan tucker's a fine old man,
Washed his face in a fryin' pan.
combed his head with a wagon wheel,
and died with a toothache in his heel.


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PostPosted: Tue May 24th, 2011, 17:06 GMT 

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iamhere wrote:
okay just noticed this. maybe old news but in my analysis i thought of this wrong.

the line: "I got a toothach in my heel" might have been lifted from an old childs folk ballad.

Old Dan Tucker
"now old dan tucker's a fine old man,
Washed his face in a fryin' pan.
combed his head with a wagon wheel,
and died with a toothache in his heel.


100%. There's that language of myth again - the song's fundamental currency. I love that collision between biblical imagery (wheels of fire, dead man's shield, etc.) and folk motif (blind mule, toothache in heel, etc.). Not to mention Ovid. :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue May 24th, 2011, 19:30 GMT 

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^^^^^
though he is lifting stuff from ballads, myths, and the bible it is clear that he thought about this stuff and added a new context to them all that is his own. that's why he's so great. for my original thoughts on this line, i feel are still true. dylan uses it as a sensory perception instead of a corny little HAHA laughing joke that is used in this child ballad.


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PostPosted: Sat August 17th, 2013, 22:57 GMT 
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I was listening to Ain't Talkin' just now and for the first time I heard this:

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Carrying a dead man's seal
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
Walkin' with a toothache in my heel


I wasn't trying to hear that...I was actually cleaning and it jumped out at me, so much so, that I wondered why I had never noticed that line and it's meaning before. I immediately went to BD.com and saw that the official lyric is shield, but in the context of the song, I think seal makes much more sense. And they are quite often transcribed incorrectly on the official site. It also rhymes more perfectly with heel.

And now art thou cursed from the earth, which hath opened her mouth to receive thy brother's blood from thy hand; When thou tillest the ground, it shall not henceforth yield unto thee her strength; a fugitive and a vagabond shalt thou be in the earth. And Cain said unto the LORD, My punishment is greater than I can bear. Behold, thou hast driven me out this day from the face of the earth; and from thy face shall I be hid; and I shall be a fugitive and a vagabond in the earth; and it shall come to pass, that every one that findeth me shall slay me. And the LORD said unto him, Therefore whosoever slayeth Cain, vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold. And the LORD set a mark (seal) upon Cain, lest any finding him should kill him. And Cain went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the east of Eden. (Genesis 4:11-16)

Right or wrong, I think I'll always hear it this way from now on.


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PostPosted: Sat August 17th, 2013, 23:28 GMT 
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raging_glory wrote:
I was listening to Ain't Talkin' just now and for the first time I heard this:

Ain't talkin', just walkin'
Carrying a dead man's seal
Heart burnin', still yearnin'
Walkin' with a toothache in my heel


I wasn't trying to hear that...I was actually cleaning and it jumped out at me, so much so, that I wondered why I had never noticed that line and it's meaning before. I immediately went to BD.com and saw that the official lyric is shield, but in the context of the song, I think seal makes much more sense. And they are quite often transcribed incorrectly on the official site. It also rhymes more perfectly with heel.

And now art thou cursed from the earth, which hath opened her mouth to receive thy brother's blood from thy hand; When thou tillest the ground, it shall not henceforth yield unto thee her strength; a fugitive and a vagabond shalt thou be in the earth. And Cain said unto the LORD, My punishment is greater than I can bear. Behold, thou hast driven me out this day from the face of the earth; and from thy face shall I be hid; and I shall be a fugitive and a vagabond in the earth; and it shall come to pass, that every one that findeth me shall slay me. And the LORD said unto him, Therefore whosoever slayeth Cain, vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold. And the LORD set a mark (seal) upon Cain, lest any finding him should kill him. And Cain went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the east of Eden. (Genesis 4:11-16)

Right or wrong, I think I'll always hear it this way from now on.


I've heard that too. But I think in the live versions he sings Shield? I'll have a listen to Boston 2009 now to check (good version by the way!)


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PostPosted: Sun August 18th, 2013, 08:58 GMT 
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Good song


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PostPosted: Fri February 28th, 2014, 21:04 GMT 

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Has anyone listened to last year's gorgeous version of this song from Rome???
I've been listenin to that first Rome concert for the past week and though overall the show is sporadically brilliant and
at times a bit of a shambles, this song completely sticks out as the highlight of the night!!
Perhaps the finest rendering of the song Bob's ever put forth.
It's breathtaking in its mood and his emotion behind every line...his piano playing is just beautiful:)
I like this version far more than the album and most live versions I've heard!!

Rome Italy
November 6 2013
http://www.sendspace.com/file/jh1vvr


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PostPosted: Fri February 28th, 2014, 23:55 GMT 
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It was extravagantly good both nights in Rome, though both also have some lapses. Dylan's more intimate fall 2013 style is a perfect match for this song, I hope it isn't a rarity in 2014.


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PostPosted: Sat March 1st, 2014, 05:19 GMT 

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iamhere wrote:
okay just noticed this. maybe old news but in my analysis i thought of this wrong.

the line: "I got a toothach in my heel" might have been lifted from an old childs folk ballad.

Old Dan Tucker
"now old dan tucker's a fine old man,
Washed his face in a fryin' pan.
combed his head with a wagon wheel,
and died with a toothache in his heel.


Old Dan Tucker isn't a Child Ballad.

I like Ain't Talkin' quite a bit. It'd be in my top 10 of his songs since the 1990's.


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PostPosted: Sun March 2nd, 2014, 03:30 GMT 
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Joined: Wed January 28th, 2009, 04:46 GMT
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Location: Elkins, WV
one of my favorite Dylan songs ever...my favorite version is 11/17/09 NYC...it's sung perfectly, just killer!!! i also really dig the 2nd night of Rome 2013, despite the few lyrical flubs...the piano is a nice touch, although i do like the kinda eerie vibe the organ provided this tune...


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PostPosted: Sun July 27th, 2014, 13:18 GMT 
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I was at a Bluegrass Festival recently and a band did the old Stanley Brothers tune Highway of Regret which, of course, is the foundation of Bob's Ain't Talkin'. It's easy to see why Bob tipped his hat to the Stanleys:

Highway Of Regret
Ain't talking, just walking
Down that highway of regret
Heart's burning, still yearning
For the best girl this poor boy's ever met

I never thought this thing could happen
I never thought you'd be untrue
Or go away with another
And break a heart that worshipped you

It makes no difference where I wander
You never seem to leave my mind
Your face is always there before me
I think about you all the time


http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=u-1f7e1YKDQ


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