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 Post subject: Bob and Motown and Soul
PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 11:07 GMT 

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How many Motown/Soul songs has Dylan covered in his career? Was thinking about this yesterday as I never did see a bootleg representing his genuine interest in this area of music.

I can think of:

You Really Got A Hold On Me (w Bette Midler)
People Get Ready (RTR)
Sidewalks, Fences and Walls
A Change Is Gonna Come


Of Bob's own songs I always thought portions of Street Legal came close as well as things like Heart of Mine and I'll Remember You. Of course even Just Like A Woman could have been too.


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 11:38 GMT 
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I remember watching a youtube analysis of Don't Think Twice which pointed out that though it was based on a folk song, the chord sequence was the one specifically used in doo wop.


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 12:54 GMT 
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Sitting on the Dock of the Bay
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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 13:01 GMT 
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Bob was certainly listening to a lot of Motown and Stax in 65/66 by all accounts.


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 13:52 GMT 
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^ For example just before he left for the Australian leg of tour '66, he was in the audience at the first night of a stand-out Otis Redding residency on the Strip.


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 13:57 GMT 
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There was a story printed in the British music press in the 70s that Bob had "Can l Get A Witness" on repeat while writing "Mr. Tambourine Man"


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 17:33 GMT 

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Saved album is the closest Dylan got to soul, gospel appropriation a la Ray Charles or Sam Cooke


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 18:10 GMT 

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Cupid


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 19:10 GMT 

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Bob is all about the blues - not Motown.


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 19:13 GMT 
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Watered Down Love.


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 22:21 GMT 
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chrome horse wrote:
Bob is all about the blues - not Motown.


Bob continually talked up the like of Smokey Robinson, Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett in the mid sixties. Clearly he was digging the competition in the charts as he made his assault on the Billboard top 40.


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 22:41 GMT 

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gibsona07 wrote:
chrome horse wrote:
Bob is all about the blues - not Motown.


Bob continually talked up the like of Smokey Robinson, Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett in the mid sixties. Clearly he was digging the competition in the charts as he made his assault on the Billboard top 40.


Those people were on the charts - so that's natural. The music, what he actually plays - is blues. Harmonica - blues. Tombstone blues, etc. etc. One show I caught him at here in NH around 1994, he did a did a very smokin' hot blues rendition of "Rainy Day Women" that was incendiary, you wouldn't even of known what song it was except for the lyrics, it was standard, high energy blues licks. Fantastic. Highway 61 - do I need to explain the blues connection to that famous Dylan item?

Newport, Dylan changes history by going electric. His guitar player? Mike Bloomfield from the Paul Butterfield Blues Band.
You were saying?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-B4yavD9AEY


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PostPosted: Tue November 29th, 2016, 22:45 GMT 
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Yes, certainly in terms of the music he plays, it's all blues, with sprinkling of country and rock n roll - albeit with the chord structures of Appalachian and English folk.

At a push, you could argue that some of his religious stuff with Duck Dunn on bass was aiming at soul, but that would still be a stretch.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 02:26 GMT 

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smiley wrote:
There was a story printed in the British music press in the 70s that Bob had "Can l Get A Witness" on repeat while writing "Mr. Tambourine Man"


I always thought It Takes A Lot To Laugh from BSVol1-3 was a lot like that song.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 02:28 GMT 

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Actually let's be honest Like A Rolling Stone is a soul song. A clear and definite soul song.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 05:25 GMT 

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'Baby please stop crying' with sax solo is pretty soulful, but so is 'Dear Landlord', in a funny kind of way. Fine lines divide some musical genres.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 14:22 GMT 

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The religious era, when he had the cool women backup singers, was very Mowtownish, and the closest he came to it, in my view.

I basically ignored that era, because of the Jesus stuff, but in retrospect there was some great stuff in it and it's worth a second look.
I just hope they don't ask for donations.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 14:53 GMT 
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'Emotionally Yours' always seemed like a deliberate attempt to write a 'soul' song. I'm sure Dylan was delighted with the O'Jays version.

I was also going to quote Dylan as saying Smokey Robinson was 'America's greatest living poet', but it seems unlikely that he actually ever said it.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 14:54 GMT 

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LeftBanke wrote:
Watered Down Love.


Sure, one of his better attempts, too. Dylan's pop efforts from 1978 on usually seem awkward.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 18:42 GMT 

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Can anyone think of any soul/motown songs he covered other than the ones we've mentioned so far. I've been looking on Olofs page to see if I can find many.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 18:54 GMT 

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I guess I Feel A Change Comin' On and Workingman's Blues No 2 are both kind of soul songs.


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 19:11 GMT 
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Lawdy Miss Clawdy
http://space.me/musicat/track/view/?Tr= ... 5699478789


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 22:29 GMT 
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I would not classify Lawdy Miss Clawdy under "Motown and Soul", it's rather New Orleans R&B.
But thanks for the link. Where does that come from?


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PostPosted: Wed November 30th, 2016, 23:54 GMT 
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JeffreyLeePierre wrote:
I would not classify Lawdy Miss Clawdy under "Motown and Soul", it's rather New Orleans R&B.
But thanks for the link. Where does that come from?

From bobsboots: "(42) 8 stars (averaged). These previously unheard tracks were recorded at Sony Music Studios, NYC on September 30, 1994. Evidently, Anyway You Want Me (Schroeder/Owens), Lawdy, Miss Clawdy (Lloyd Price), and Money Honey (Jesse Stone) were to be used for some type of Elvis tribute that never happened. Twenty seconds into Anyway You Want Me we get to hear the famous Dylan cough. Lawdy Miss Clawdy is a very rough mix that starts and ends roughly as well, but the vocals are crisp and way out front. Money Honey is yet another rough mix, but in this one the vocals are buried to far in the mix. Money Honey II is a completely different take that has been sped up a few beats per minute. The musicians are attempting to polish the song, and the mix is proper, making it seem that this is the one that would be more likely to be considered for release."


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PostPosted: Thu December 1st, 2016, 19:01 GMT 
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Good to know, many thanks.
I would have loved an Elvis tribute from Dylan. Much more than the Sinatra ones.


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