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New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronicles
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Author:  My Echo, My Shadow And Me [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 00:41 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

to the grave wrote:
Johanna Parker wrote:
Nice how he admits, in so many words, that he is painting from photos. As if we didn't know! :lol:


So is he taking pictures, enlarging them, printing them, and then just working from those pictures (along with his basic sketches that will also be displayed at the exhibit) to create the paintings? And do we think he is still just starting with sketches from the photos, adding the paint later to allow for new colorways? Sorry for my lack of knowledge; while I loved my art history class, it was a long time ago and did not engage quite so much with technique. And my interest in these works is largely aesthetic rather than technical....grave


I have a professional background in art/design and art history and my understanding of the method Dylan describes is as follows:

The use of the Nikon D3300 (a digital photo camera) seems to indicate that he took photos of the sceneries he wanted to paint, transferred the images to a computer and then projected the images onto canvas or paper using a modern projector. He then must have traced the images using a pencil. Some were painted over with acrylic paint or watercolors, some were left as raw pencil drawings. In the Vanity Fair piece he makes it clear that he is not using an actual camera obscura, but the camera obscura method:

"So I went to the camera-obscura method. The camera obscura was a primitive camera invented in the 1600s which projected an image upside down so the painter could work from it. This was a real camera, but the image was not printable. It could only be seen and filled in. Caravaggio used this in about all of his paintings and so did Van Eyck and Vermeer. These days you don’t have to go to all that trouble. You can use a real camera. I put a 58-mm 0.43x wide-angle conversion lens onto a used Nikon D3300 Af-p on quite a few paintings (...)."

He does not elaborate on how he transferred the digital photographic images to canvas or paper, but since he says he used "the camera-obscura method", he obviously refers to using projections. The "camera-obscura method" is projection-based.

Using photos that are projected onto canvas with the help of a modern projector is common in painting today (e.g. one of the most expensive living painters, Gerhard Richter, works that way when doing figurative work). The projections are traced with a pencil and then painted over. Ever since the invention of optical devices painters have used these devices to transfer images to canvas for tracing and then painting. First there was the camera obscura, later came slide projectors, overhead and similar projectors and now there are video projectors.

The "RCA television screen" and the "old movie frame" used for some paintings were probably simply employed as framing devices to isolate the desired composition, which might then have been drawn "after nature".

P.S.: The shows listed on the marquee in the "Theater Downtown LA" painting are actual shows that took place in October/November 2014. Dylan was in the LA area on October 24–26 of that year, playing shows at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, so he probably took the photo he based his painting on during that stay in the city.

Author:  monklover [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 02:20 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

wow, Clifford Brown! Maybe Zim will regale us with some Joy Spring on pedal steel and harmonica one of these shows.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 03:37 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

Thanks, Echo.

Author:  smoke [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 05:00 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

Fascinating stuff, thanks to all.

Author:  bobschool [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 05:51 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

Echo, thank you for your knowledge.

it is much appreciated that someone in the same field as bob in this vein can opine.

would you proffer an opinion of this method
and perhaps about anything else about this series,
the text, the interview, the art, the soundtrack?

Author:  bobschool [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 06:11 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

Ronnie McDowell paints neon signs too.

George Jones liked his "Last Chance".

:lol: brilliant.



Image

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 06:44 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

I suggest that Bob Dylan has been reading the poems of Robert Montgomery.

Dylan:
Quote:
Staying out of the mainstream and traveling the back roads, free-born style.


From Luther, A Poem:
Quote:
But, plainly bold, with apostolic mien,
And full-toned manhood in a free-born style, —
A husband, in the great reformer see,
Like Martin Luther, and like nothing more!


From Oxford, A Poem:
Quote:
Then long ador'd, in this august retreat
May Greece and Rome for high communion meet;
Long may their forceful page and free-born style
From year to year succeeding youth beguile


With Reformation Day on Oct 31, and entering the 500th post-reformation year in 2016, the Luther poem appears to fit the time line here.


--------------------


Also:
Bob Dylan Painted The Most Instagrammed Spot In Brooklyn
http://gothamist.com/2016/11/03/bob_dylan_dumo_painter.php

Author:  scottw [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 10:21 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

A closer look at Dylan's use of the text of the New Orleans Museum of Art "Glossary of Art Terms" https://noma.org/uploads/Glossary_with_ ... 286964.pdf

Dylan:
An attempt was made to depersonalize the works-strip them of illusion. All the work is exclusively placed in non-exotic settings within a rationally defined space. The focus points are important and sometimes unusually placed.

Glossary of Art Terms: 
Romanticism: Early 19th century artistic style that reacted against the cool reason of Neoclassicism. Romantic artists emphasized emotions in a bold, dramatic manner and returned to nature in its wild state as a source of inspiration. Bright colors, loose compositions, and exotic settings often combined to create paintings tinged with nostalgic

Renaissance: A term denoting a revival or resurrection of knowledge and culture that took place primarily in Italy between the 14th and 16th centuries, but also in other European countries. During this time artists looked to the ancient Greek and Roman artistic and philosophical traditions for inspiration and sought to perfect the illusion of physical reality through the depiction of idealized figures placed within a rationally defined space.

Focal point: The first part of a work to attract the attention of the viewer and to which the eye returns most naturally. Focal points are created by contrast, location, isolation, convergence, and use of the unusual.
==
Dylan:
Natural scenery is always the main feature. These are not crowded compositions. They are using basic structures to express feelings and ideas. Perfect proportion and logic instead of emotion. The nature of beauty, the lines, forms, shape, and texture that emphasize the recognizable create harmony where natural scenery is the main feature.

Glossary of Art Terms: 
Landscape: A painting or drawing which represents natural scenery as the main feature.

Mannerism: European 16th century artistic style which developed out of the Renaissance by rejecting balance and harmony in favor of emotional intensity and ambiguity. Mannerist paintings feature highly emotional scenes and distorted figures mainly through severe distortions of perspective and scale, complex and crowded compositions, strong and sometimes harsh or discordant colors, and elongated figures in exaggerated poses.

Post-Impressionism: French painting style of the late 19th century which followed the Impressionist painters and used basic structures of art to express feelings and ideas. The Post-Impressionism movement refers to a time period in which principal artists Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Paul Cézanne, Georges Seurat, Paul Gauguin, and Vincent van Gogh worked and developed distinctly different styles.

Classical: Referring to the art of ancient Greece and Rome. The Greeks created art based on the ideals of perfect proportion and logic instead of emotion. The Romans adapted Greek art and spread it throughout the civilized world which ensured that it remained a vital source of ideas and inspiration. Classical art possesses formal, finished, and polished qualities.

Abstract Art: 20th century art style that experimented with the elements of art (line, color, shape, form and texture) and emphasized form and emotion over recognizable subject matter. Artistic representations were often generalized, universal, and nonrepresentational. Artists who worked in this style include Wasily Kandinsky, Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock.

Aesthetic: The branch of philosophy that provides a theory relating to the nature of beauty and fine art in accordance with the accepted notions of good taste.
==
Dylan:
I restricted myself to traditional subject matter, viewing nothing as shallow or gaudy. A simple hot-dog stand can have classical features, and I view it as such (Donut Shop, High Wire). Whiplash curves, flying buttresses, pointed steeples, arches, and waves. They are all there, reflecting any time period, purposely trying to stay away from dramatic or theatrical lighting effects, bringing naturalism to the forefront.

Glossary of Art Terms:
Neoclassicism: Artistic style developed in the 19th century as a response against Rococo, which came to be viewed as shallow and gaudy. Neoclassicism art used classical features and was unemotional and realistic. Benjamin West and Jean-Joseph Tiallasson worked in this style.

Art Nouveau: An artistic movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries that was especially seen in decorative arts and architecture. The movement focused on the abolishment of the traditional hierarchy of the arts, which viewed painting and sculpture as being superior to craft-based decorative arts. Art Nouveau was first popular throughout Europe and spread internationally. The style includes exaggerated, asymmetrical forms including whiplash curves, flames, waves, and stylized female forms.

Realism: Mid 19th century artistic style in which artists turned away from the style of Neoclassicism and the theatrical drama of Romanticism to paint familiar scenes and events as they actually appeared. Realism can also denote works from any time period which are rendered in a realistic manner.

Gothic: Giorgio Vasari, an Italian Renaissance art historian, coined the term in the 16th century to refer to an architectural and artistic style prevalent in Western Europe between the 12th and 16th centuries. It is characterized by the integration of the arts of sculpture, painting, stained glass and architecture which is epitomized in the great cathedrals. Gothic cathedrals used soaring interiors, pointed arches, and flying buttresses to emphasize upward movement and featured stained-glass windows. Paintings of this era showed humans in a realistic, yet flat, style. Examples from NOMA’s collection include Madonna and Child with Saints by followers of Bernardo Daddi of c. 1340.

Baroque: Artistic style that developed after the Reformation in the seventeenth century. In Northern European countries the development of Baroque style reflected the period's religious tensions and the ideas of modern philosophy and the scientific revolution with a move toward greater naturalism. Primarily, the Baroque style uses exaggerated lines and forms to create a sense of dynamism, drama, and emotionalism. Artists used theatrical effects such as dramatic lighting effects, contrast between dark and light, ornamentation.
==
Dylan:
In some paintings, the brightness of reflected light was brought forth in evident brushstrokes. Sometimes sunlight hitting certain places would contrast deeply with areas of shadow (Sunset on the Prairie, Threatening Skies). I tried to avoid skewed perspectives or man-made light, yet sometimes it couldn't be avoided. An expert painter is a master in color theory, which means he can turn white into black using a complex value system of colors and hues like a Mark Rothko. "The Beaten Path" however, reflects explorations in color, sometimes using colors that become less pronounced and outlines that become less precise.

Glossary of Art Terms:
Color: An element of art that is derived from reflected light. The sensation of color is usually determined visually in the brain by response of the eyes to different wavelengths of light by measurement of hue, saturation, and brightness of the reflected light. Color has three properties: hue (color name), value (lightness or darkness), and intensity (strength). Colors can be described as warm or cool, glossy or matte, subdued or bright.

Fauvism: Derived from the French word fauve meaning “wild beast,” fauvism was the first of the avant-garde movements that flourished in France in the early years of the 20th century. Fauve painters broke from Impressionism as well as traditional methods of perception. The style is defined by a use of bright, vivid colors directly from the tube often applied in broad flat areas with undisguised brushstrokes. Artists associated with the Fauve movement include Henri Matisse and George Braque.

Op Art: The term Op Art relates to several tendencies in art-making developed during the 1960s that involved a wide range of experiments with optics or optical illusions. Artists tried to create the impression of movement on the surface of paintings with hard edges, smooth surfaces, and mathematical planning. These experiments often involved the use of bright colors, skewed perspectives, and natural or man-made light.

Aerial Perspective: Also referred to as atmospheric perspective. A method utilized by artists to suggest a far distance in a landscape painting. As the distance between an object and the viewer increases, outlines become less precise and colors become less pronounced and bluer.
==
Dylan:
Flowing or curved lines form another visual vehicle, suggesting a far distance in a landscape painting. Architecture itself is always a vital source of ideas and inspiration, but, always, "The Beaten Path" tries to return to the traditional methods of perceptions-things that are perceived in the visible world-taking the three dimensional into a two dimensional format using contrast, location, isolation, and convergence.

Glossary of Art Terms:
Aerial Perspective: Also referred to as atmospheric perspective. A method utilized by artists to suggest a far distance in a landscape painting. As the distance between an object and the viewer increases, outlines become less precise and colors become less pronounced and bluer.

Classical: Referring to the art of ancient Greece and Rome. The Greeks created art based on the ideals of perfect proportion and logic instead of emotion. The Romans adapted Greek art and spread it throughout the civilized world which ensured that it remained a vital source of ideas and inspiration. Classical art possesses formal, finished, and polished qualities.

Figurative: Representative art which portrays things perceived in the visible world such as the human figure or nature however altered or distorted it may be.

Cubism: Influential 20th century art movement that first appeared in 1907 and was spearheaded by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. Cubism is an analytic study in form and an attempt to represent three-dimensions on a two-dimensional format. Objects are represented from many different points of view simultaneously using overlapping facets. Followers of Picasso and Braque include Ferdinand Leger, Jacques Lipchitz and Jean Metzinger.

Focal point: The first part of a work to attract the attention of the viewer and to which the eye returns most naturally. Focal points are created by contrast, location, isolation, convergence, and use of the unusual.
==
Dylan:
There was a conscious attempt to dismiss consumer culture or popular culture, including mass media, commercial art, celebrities, consumer or product packaging, billboard signs, comic strips, magazine advertising. "The Beaten Path" works represent a different subject matter from the everyday imagery of consumer culture. There is nothing to suggest these paintings were inspired by the writings of Sigmund Freud or that they were based on any mental images that occur in dreams, no fantasy worlds, religious mysticism or ambiguous subject matter. In every picture the viewer doesn't have to wonder whether it's an actual object or a delusional one. If the viewer visited where the picture actually existed, he or she would see the same thing. It is what unites us all.

Glossary of Art Terms: 
Pop Art: Artistic style used in the early 1960s in America featuring subject matter from everyday imagery that is a part of consumer culture or popular culture with a mixture of irony and celebration. Common sources include mass media, commercial art, celebrities, consumer product packaging, comic strips, and advertising. Pop artists include Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Claes Oldenberg.

Surrealism: 20th century artistic movement founded by André Breton and born out of the Dada movement. Surrealism was inspired by the writings of Sigmund Freud and based on the uncontrolled association of mental images that often occur in dreams. Surrealism asserted that art can come from the unconscious and found artistic expression through collage and freehand abstraction based on automatic drawing as well as the incongruous juxtaposition of objects. Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, Henri Magritte and Joan Miró are among the artists associated with Surrealism.

Symbolist: A late 19th century art movement that was centered on art and literature. The symbolists rejected objectivity in favor of fantasy worlds, religious mysticism, and ambiguous subject matter.

Trompe l’oeil: French for “deceives the eye.” Tompe l’oeil is a painting technique in which painters try to give the viewer the illusion of seeing a three-dimensional object, thus, the viewer wonders whether he or she is viewing an actual object rather than a painted one.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 10:36 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

Glad he's still working on Chronicles! :lol:

Author:  goodnitesteve [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 15:07 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

Thank you, My Echo, My Shadow, and Me. I recently picked up a camera obscura reproduction tool, but in retrospect it's cumbersome and kind of stupid when I could just do as Bob does. I have a projector that'd work for this purpose, but I don't know how I'd get it to project onto the canvas. I'll have to play around with it. I can almost never get my hands to do as my eyes see it.

The only reason Camera Obscuras were used is because they didn't have that medium - be it film or digital - to save it and paint later.

With that said, I have a hard time believing Bob wanders around with a Nikon. Wouldn't folks have seen him doing this? Maybe he has a lackey that he sends around to photograph things and he picks the best ones, draws, and paints them later.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 15:19 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

goodnitesteve wrote:
With that said, I have a hard time believing Bob wanders around with a Nikon. Wouldn't folks have seen him doing this? Maybe he has a lackey that he sends around to photograph things and he picks the best ones, draws, and paints them later.


Previously, many of the photos he used were to be found online. For The Asia Series, he apparently raided somebody's flickr photo stream. For The New Orleans Series, he used old-fashioned postcard images. Also he used photos from the Magnum collection. There's no indication that original photos have been taken for the sole purpose of Bob creating paintings from them. These facts stand apart from whatever he may have said in interviews at the time.

Author:  goodnitesteve [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 15:27 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

Well, in this particular case he says he used the Nikon and the shows/dates on the marquee add up to area the NET was at the time. This may be something he's been doing lately after the Flickr thing, but we don't know. I'd love for the next Chronicles to be about Bob the visual artist and completely ignore his songwriting technique. That would be fitting of Bob.

We've been talking about this in the Bob and Tracing forum a while back. The documentary Tim's Vermeer goes into the subject heavily. The director said only a few people had screener copies of that film and one of them was Bob Dylan. The song at the end of that film is Bob's When I Paint my Masterpiece. Bob mentions Vermeer in the Vanity Fair article.

Coincidence? We'll never know.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Fri November 4th, 2016, 16:02 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: New Vanity Fair: Bob's Longest Prose Piece Since Chronic

goodnitesteve wrote:
This may be something he's been doing lately after the Flickr thing, but we don't know.


But we'll find out.

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